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Original Album Classics Box set

4.0 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD (1 Feb. 2010)
  • Number of Discs: 3
  • Format: Box set
  • Label: Sony Music Cmg
  • ASIN: B0030FUAKW
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 41,454 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. No Regrets
  2. Hold An Old Friend's Hand
  3. Boulder To Birmingham
  4. Walkin' In The Sun
  5. Lover's Lullaby
  6. I've Got To Have You
  7. He'll Break Your Heart
  8. Everything That Touches You
  9. Lovers
  10. Burn Our Bridges

Disc: 2

  1. Lines
  2. Taking It All In Stride
  3. Inside Of You
  4. Have You Seen My Baby
  5. We're All Alone
  6. Many Rivers To Cross
  7. First Day
  8. Brand New Tennessee Waltz
  9. Hard To Be Friends
  10. Dreaming As One

Disc: 3

  1. Shutout
  2. Fat Mama Kick
  3. Nite Flights
  4. The Electrician
  5. Death of Romance
  6. Den Haague
  7. Rhythms of Vision
  8. Disciples of Death
  9. Fury and the Fire
  10. Child of Flames

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

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After Scott Walker's 60's masterpieces, and, of course, the Walker Brothers own hits in that time, you might expect a bit more of the same. Well there is 'No Regrets' as the first track on the first album, but after that .....
The rest, well, are for completists: The first two albums are (relatively) second-rate. Trying to be a bit more modern; 'rocky' and 'country', but mostly without that extra quality that lifted the previous decades music.

The third album 'Nite Flights' is a bit more difficult, and certainly has no 'pop' music in it. It's deep and dark, and predicts a lot of Scott's later work. That's why I bought this set: because it's the only place to get hold of a copy of the album (at the moment), and I was curious to hear it.

So don't expect the big tunes and production values of the earlier work. These are evolutionary albums, for Scott at least.
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No need to give background information - for that, see the previous review!

Most important point to make is that this is the easiest way to acquire the Nite Flights album - which essentially marks the point where Scott Walker started to become what he is now, a progressive composer who transcends boundaries.

His contributions to this album aren't on the level of The Drift, to be sure - they're Bowie-influenced art-rock with hints of avant-garde electronica/jazz-rock, but you can't disrespect that! And remember how far removed they were from what was expected of him musically at the time.

But it isn't an EP disguised as an album: it's a shame the six songs contributed by the other two Walkers have been undervalued. It's true they're not on the same page as Scott - my favorite description (and I can't remember who said it first) is that Scott's been listening to Heroes and Lodger, while John and Gary are still stuck on Young Americans and Station to Station. But, again - nothing's wrong with that. They succeed in making thoroughly modern (for the time) pop-rock, and these songs too may have come as a revelation to long-time Walker watchers (the lyrics are quite extraordinary).

The "filler" here is to be found on the other two albums - No Regrets and Lines are just...rather ordinary '70s adult-contemporary pop. And it's not just song selection that's the problem. What's most frustrating about them is the way the Walkers manage to diminish several great songs (like the Jimmy Cliff and Randy Newman choices) - with feeble arrangements that not even these great vocal stylists can breathe life into.
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Big Picture Contextual: Scott Walker was in 60 boy-band the Walker Bros & at the demise of which he moved to (almost) parallel solo careers: one with his own early evening BBC show and albums of e.g. songs from that and another of hits from recent blockbuster romantic movies ("Scott the MovieGoer" if you will); the other more interestingly a series of lps ("Scott" thru "Scott 4") which featured a mix of orginals and lovingly selected covers including of (lots of) Jacques Brel, all with gloriously grandiouse and doomy orchestral arrangements and his soaring baritone.

After "Scott 4" sunk without selling he drifted off only to re-emerge, then championed as a neglected influence by Julian Cope amonst others, with 1983's "Climate of Hunter", 1995's "Tilt" and 200?'s "The Drift", which put him at the very edge of modern music. (All of this documented in the excellent DVD "30 Century Man").

But between "Scott 4" and "Climate" there were a series of Walker Brothers reunion lps, which is what we have here. Faraway the only crucial outing in terms of the link between "4" and "Climate" was "Nite Flights", or more specifically, the first 4 Scott-penned tracks, "Nite Flights", Fatback Mama Kick","The Shutout" and the mighty "The Electrician", which complimented things that Bowie-Eno-Iggy were churning out in Berlin at the same time, echoed some Neu Motorik and pre-saged some of the latter Joy Division recordings etc.
I used to own these 4 tracks on a 7-inch vinyl e.p. bought in 1978 and having been trying to find on CD for years- but "Nite Flights has only available for a king's ranson- until cropping up on this reasonably priced set.

The four Scott tracks on Nite Flights are still as breathtaking as they were 30+ years ago and are easily worth the entrance price.
Read more ›
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I have been looking to find Nite Flights on CD for a while now so when I saw this collection of albums at a dirt cheap price there was no other option but to buy this set of fine and dandy albums.

The first time I had heard of Scott Walker was through Bowie in 1993 after he covered the title track. From there I had the pleasures of enjoying Scott's albums over the following 20 years. If you have not heard his later solo stuff then you are missing out.

What you get with this trio of albums is some of the most interesting and progressive music you are likely to find. If you have never heard The Walker Brother before then start with this excellent collection of albums.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x94666dec) out of 5 stars 9 reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x947a3e40) out of 5 stars Five stars for the 4 songs I wanted 21 Feb. 2011
By J. Hundley - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Bought this set, frankly, because it was the cheapest way available to get Nite Flights on CD. Finally decided to replace my lp and was chagrined to find that buying all three of these was vastly cheaper than trying to get NF by itself. And, frankly, was really only wanting the four Scott Walker songs on NF.

All that said, there are a handful of enjoyable songs spread out over the other two discs, but as a whole, the rest is rather bland, MOR soft rock that fades from memory by the time the song is over. Still, unless someone rereleases NF in an affordable package, this is still worth it.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x93de2084) out of 5 stars The Brothers' dark era 9 Sept. 2012
By L. M. - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
On overview, this 3 studio album collection by The Walker Brothers compiles the least necessary (and often avoidable) part of their career - their mid seventies reunion - and for several reasons.

Firstly, their material became a downgrade from their sixties output. Not only did the Brothers turned 180 degrees from baroque pop melodramas to soft rock and blue-eyed soul, but also their material ceased to come from relevant sources. Whereas they were once top interpreters of American Brill Building material (Bacharach, Mann, Weil, Goffin, King etc) they turned their influences to the likes of Boz Scaggs and Elton John (the latter in style, not material).

While there are noteworthy numbers here and there (the song "No Regrets" being their peak commercial track) fans will shy away from both Lines and No Regrets, possessing almost zero artistic value, until they reach Nite Flights, where Scott Walker shows off his very first self-penned numbers of his avant-garde reincarnation. And likewise it is hardly of any value to casual fans - if anything it will leave a bad first impression - which will be the case due to the budget price of this collection.

Material-wise is nice to have these hard to find works on cd, and even better from the official Columbia sources, but it lacks any notes or booklets, replacing it for mini lp sleeves and nothing else. So AS A WHOLE 3 stars.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x93de22e8) out of 5 stars Nice collection! 30 Nov. 2010
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Good to have these three albums in one place. Have been looking for a reasonably-priced copy of Nite Flights for a while and finally found this! I was also pleasantly surprised with the country-tinged sound of Lines and No Regrets; there's great songs on both albums. The CDs each have their own cardboard sleeve with the original vinyl art.
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x93de2624) out of 5 stars Track listing 29 Mar. 2010
By Giddy Giddy Carousel - Published on Amazon.com
Disc: 1
1. No Regrets
2. Hold An Old Friend's Hand
3. Boulder To Birmingham
4. Walkin' In The Sun
5. Lover's Lullaby
6. I've Got To Have You
7. He'll Break Your Heart
8. Everything That Touches You
9. Lovers
10. Burn Our Bridges
Disc: 2
1. Lines
2. Taking It All In Stride
3. Inside Of You
4. Have You Seen My Baby
5. We're All Alone
6. Many Rivers To Cross
7. First Day
8. Brand New Tennessee Waltz
9. Hard To Be Friends
10. Dreaming As One
Disc: 3
1. Shutout
2. Fat Mama Kick
3. Nite Flights
4. Electrician
5. Death Of Romance
6. Den Haague
7. Rhythms Of Vision
8. Disciples Of Death
9. Fury And The Fire
10. Child Of Flames
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x93de2168) out of 5 stars Of interest ONLY for fans of Scott Walker's late career 8 May 2013
By Christopher Culver - Published on Amazon.com
The Walker Brothers hit London in the mid-1960s in a remarkable reversal of the British Invasion: UK schoolgirls were going hysterical at these three good-looking Americans -- not brothers and none really named Walker. The rich orchestration on their records, provided by classic pop arranger Ivor Raymonde, set them apart from other teen idols and sent Scott Walker (née Noel Scott Engel) on to a critically acclaimed solo career.

But anyone nostalgic for the Sixties should watch out, because those records are not what you get in this Sony box set. Instead we have the three albums from the Walker Brothers' mid-1970s reunion, a desperate attempt to make some money after the solo careers of John Walker, Gary Walker and Scott Walker had hit their respective slumps. They announced their reunion in 1975 with NO REGRETS, a collection of 10 schmaltzy cover tunes. The music is uninspired country and western or soul, and through orchestration is sometimes used, it is more a lame effect here than something majestic integrated with the music. Scott Walker was struggling with alcoholism (on the album cover, he is shirtless and covering his face with a can of Newcastle Brown Ale) and though his baritone is great as always, one can hear that his heart is not in the material. The Walker Brothers' 1976 followup LINES can similarly be consigned to oblivion.

But for fans of Scott Walker's late work, this box set is an essential purchase because of NITE FLIGHTS, released in 1978 and destined to be the last Walker Brothers's last album. With their record label about to go bankrupt, the three musicians decided to go whether their individual musical visions took them. John and Gary's songs are as forgettable as any of the covers on the previous album. Scott Walker's four contributions, however, are something from another world.

"Shutout", "Fat Mama Kick" and "Nite Flights" sound like the pop music of the future (and still do, 35 years later). Though the backing is simple rock guitars, bass, drums and keyboards, in their lyrics Walker for the first time presents the surrealistic and uneasy imagery that would continue through his late solo albums. The fourth track, "The Electrician", is less enigmatic but much more disturbing.

Shutout: "Throw off / Those gimmicks / To the boys / Let them / Send it all up / In the air / There is / Crouching and wailing / On stones / Down here / We must freeze off / This ratmosphere / Scraping out noise / Across night wires / Runs for the distant cities / There is never / A lock / In the fall / Down here / As the / BIG FULL / Pours away..." Far from the soporific vocals of the preceding albums, here Scott Walker engages and confronts the lister. There's a screaming guitar solo by session player Jim Sullivan.

Fat Mama Kick: "Sunfighters / Locked in / Right angle rooms / Watch their lovers / Sleep face down / In the yellow lite / Keep the balance / On a back curve / 'Till the war / With the night Is over..." The vocals, on top of a 4/4 beat with saxophone and drums, are distorted as if heard through a filter. Chris Mercer goes all out with a saxophone solo near the end.

Nite Flights: "The moving has come through / The danger brushing you / Turns its face into the heat and runs the tunnels / It's so cold / The dark dug up by dogs / The stiches torn and broke / The raw meat fist you choke / Has hit the bloodlite / Glass traps open and close on / Night flights..." The bassline on this track, played by Scott Walker himself, is extraordinary and the vocal expression possibly the most memorable of his entire career.

The Electrician: "Baby, it's slow, when lights go low. There's no help, no...". Troubled by recent revelations that the CIA was torturing Central American insurgents, Walker depicted such interrogation techniques as a twisted romance, two lovers lustfully engaging in a bondage session. The vocal section lasts only about a minute, but it is of extreme emotional impact. Most of the song, the longest on the album, consists of orchestration, menacing and dissonant at the opening, lush and sweeping after the lyrics are delivered.

Those who have not yet heard Scott Walker's late period should probably start with 1995's Tilt. But if his music proves as lifechanging for you as it did for me, you should go on to his other solo albums, and the four Scott Walker songs here are definitely worth the price of the whole set.

(Verified purchase from another retailer)
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