Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £6.64

Save £3.35 (34%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Orbus (Spatterjay Book 3) by [Asher, Neal]
Audible Narration
Playing...
Loading...
Paused
Kindle App Ad

Orbus (Spatterjay Book 3) Reprints , Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 94 customer reviews
Book 3 of 3 in Spatterjay (3 Book Series)

See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£6.64

40 Kindle Books for £1
Browse our selection of Kindle Books discounted to £1 each. Learn more

Complete Series
Get a £1 reward for movies or TV
Enjoy a £1.00 reward to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Video when you purchase any Amazon Kindle Book from the Kindle Store (excluding Kindle Unlimited, Periodicals and free Kindle Books) offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 reward per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at 23:59 on Wednesday, September 27, 2017. Terms and conditions apply

Product description

Review

'Asher delivers a satisfying space opera full of adrenaline highs... Fast-paced fun.'
--SFX

''A satisfying space opera full of adrenaline highs.' --SFX

'Rail-guns rattle off, pulse rifles fire out shots and explosions ring out. This is what Asher does best.'
--SciFiNow

`It is, like all of Asher's work, brilliant fun.'
--Deathray

'Yet another storming performance from the prolific Asher of high-octane violence, exotic tech, and terrifying and truly alien aliens. '
--Daily Mail

Book Description

The continuing adventure of Captain Orbus following on from The Voyage of Sable Keech

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1084 KB
  • Print Length: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Tor; Reprints edition (4 Sept. 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003DWC6M2
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 94 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #72,661 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
In Orbus Neal Asher again takes up the story of the characters he last addressed in The Voyage of the Sable Keech (2006): the cantankerous war-drone Sniper and his sidekick, sub-mind Thirteen, escaping from likely reprogramming by Polity AIs; the Prador Vrell, mutated by the Spatterjay virus into something alien to his own kind and under sentence of death; and the eponymous Captain Orbus himself, seeking redemption for, and recovery from, centuries of madness on the Spatterjay seas by taking a job as the human captain of the off-world cargo ship Gunnard.

All of this motley group end up in the aptly named Graveyard, the demilitarised buffer zone between Polity and Prador space, where both races conduct a cold war of espionage and covert operations. Not surprisingly, they find themselves in the midst of much larger, and more dangerous, events than any had anticipated, as both the Prador King and Earth Central move battle fleets into place along their borders, the Golgoloth, a being long believed by most Prador to be myth, reveals its presence, and a secret long-concealed in the genetic code of the Spatterjay virus threatens to open the door to an apocalypse for Human, Prador and AI alike.

All of the ingredients fans have come to expect from a Neal Asher novel are present in Orbus: chapter introductions from How it is by Gordon, Artificial Intelligences who seem more human than the real thing, lovingly described and detailed aliens and technology, fearsome space-battles and a swift-moving plot.
Read more ›
1 Comment 22 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
You'll need to have at least read "The Skinner", and possibly "The Voyage of Sable Keech" to make sense of this one; I have and I'd forgotten who Orbus was. I feel this book takes the Spatterjay/Prador/Old Captains/Jain picotech business about as far as it can go, and more worryingly, that Asher has taken his Polity series about as far as it can go too. This is readable, but mediocre, in my opinion, and signals time for a change of direction for the Polity series. You'll find out quite a bit about the Prador in here, and a not-hugely-surprising twist related to Hoopers and the Spatterjay virus. The "twist" regarding the virus is beginning to get a little played out now in the Polity series - nearly everything starts coming back to a certain something you'll have read about time and again.

Sadly, I'd have to call this one "missable".
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I love the agent series and was reserved about the spaterjay ones... Loved them too. But Orbus wasn't my favourite character and was reserved about a story with him as one of the main character. I couldn't be more wrong. Loved the story and loved him, was enthralled throughout.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Neal Asher doesn't mess about, he's not quirky, abstract and sophisticated like Ian M Banks, he doesn't inject Tolkieneske fantasy like Peter F Hamilton and he's not got that clinical brutal cold sci fi feel that some of the books Alastair Reynolds has written. I like the work of all of these writers and Asher brings something different. Balls out action, gore, a sense of humour, proper monsterous aliens and gigantic planet destroying battle sequences all written with a pace and zip that makes most of his books impossible to put down. In some ways he manages to get that old school wiz bang sci but creates a totally contemporary and very british feel.

For new comers to Asher, please oh please do not read his books out of order which some reviewers seem to have done. I cannot for the life of me understand why as
this book in a line of three Spatterjay novels and if you aint read the first (The Skinner) how could you possibily hope to get the punch of the book. In fact, read all of the preceding polity novels before this one to get the fully rounded expereince.

It's a top read.
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
If this was the future, and there existed a desolate, lawless area of space which was a contested no-man's-land between two implacably opposed galactic cultures and which was known colloquially as "the Graveyard", would you ever want to go there? Would you, in fact, want to venture within a hundred light years of the place? I certainly wouldn't, and neither would you if you're as pathetically cautious as I am. Luckily for readers of Orbus, however, the characters in Neal Asher's latest book are not averse to a little trouble now and then. And trouble - in spades - is exactly what they find in the Graveyard.

Ever since reading Neal Asher's The Skinner back in 2003, I have thought that the Prador (a race of enjoyably nasty and warlike crustacean-analogues from deep space) are among some of the best SF baddies to emerge since Terry Nation invented the Daleks. Furthermore I have believed it was high time that they had a whole novel to themselves, more or less, without any danger of the planet Spatterjay's entertainingly horrible and ruthless oceanic fauna stealing the show. Asher's 2006 novel Prador Moon came close to accomplishing this, the one caveat being that it was all too short, but at 438 pages, Orbus hits the bull's-eye.

So, what's to like? Plenty! As per usual in a Neal Asher book, there is no shortage of futuristic mayhem, as Prador engage in battle with one another, and with monstrosities even scarier than themselves, in a flurry of explosions, crashes, laser blasts, rail-gun duels and hand-to-hand (claw-to-claw) fisticuffs.
Read more ›
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

click to open popover