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Oranges (Penguin Modern Classics) Paperback – 24 Feb 2000

5.0 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd (24 Feb. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141182032
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141182032
  • Product Dimensions: 12.8 x 0.9 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,421,862 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

McPhee's genius is that he can write about anything. --Robert Macfarlane

McPhee is a grand master of narrative non-fiction. --Guardian

A delicious book ... more absorbing than many a novel. --Harper's --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

John McPhee has published more than thirty books and much of his work first appeared in the pages of The New Yorker, where he has been a staff writer since 1963. He is a four-time finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, winning in 1999 for Annals of the Former World. McPhee teach¬es non-fiction writing at Princeton University.

Richard Mabey is a naturalist and award-winning author and journalist. He is the author of His works include The Cabaret of Plants, Nature Cure, and Flora Britannica. He is an active member of national and local conservation groups and lives in Norfolk. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Top Customer Reviews

By bernie TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 13 Feb. 2017
Format: Paperback
John McPhee, born and raised in Princeton, once again intrigues us with his tales of "citrus."

He took what was supposed to be an article on oranges and expanded it into a book.

He covers everything you want to know and then some. Under history he will remind you not to let any females sit in you orange tree.
Some of the subjects are history, tales, migration, how to grow, and how to market oranges and grapefruit. There is eve substantial information on the way to consume the critters.

Would you prefer fresh or concentrate?

If you like John McGhee's descriptive book, He has written well on other subjects. However is you are interested in the migration and commerce of plant life then you need to track sown a copy of "Green Cargoes" by Anne Dorrance.
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Format: Paperback
You might think that a whole book on oranges was just too much, but I read this book as eagerly as if it was a mystery and I couldn't wait to see what was on the next page. It is worth reading for the writing alone, as McPhee's style brings the groves to life and makes you laugh aloud at times with subtle humor.
In addition to describing the origin of oranges, their cultivation and rising popularity from when the Hesperides would watch them to the present of the book (1967), he explains how it came to be that most of us have orange juice for breakfast. There is some very interesting science in the book as well, and it seems quite thorough in every respect (after all, it is an entire book on oranges!). There are some excellent character descriptions of the original settlers and orange barons as well: "The Indians hated Russell and always had. One of them fired at him and nicked him the arm. Feeling pain that night, Russell went into the boat's cabin and groped in the dark for a bottle of salve. Picking up a bottle of ink by mistake, he poured it over his arm. When the sun came up, he thought he had gangrene. The others knew that it was ink, but they thought even less of Russell than the Indians did, and they said nothing." It is a must-read for anyone who is traveling to FL and wants to know more about the real FL and less about theme-parks!
The only disappointment might be for those who live in California, as although CA oranges are given a place, the main focus is on FL.
A great read!
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Format: Paperback
John McPhee, born and raised in Princeton, once again intrigues us with his tales of "citrus."

He took what was supposed to be an article on oranges and expanded it into a book.

He covers everything you want to know and then some. Under history he will remind you not to let any females sit in you orange tree.
Some of the subjects are history, tales, migration, how to grow, and how to market oranges and grapefruit. There is eve substantial information on the way to consume the critters.

Would you prefer fresh or concentrate?

If you like John McGhee's descriptive book, He has written well on other subjects. However is you are interested in the migration and commerce of plant life then you need to track sown a copy of "Green Cargoes" by Anne Dorrance.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Paperback
Just stunning. I'm reading a book on oranges directly after an action-packed sci-fi novel, but as exciting and imaginative as the latter was, McPhee grips me more with the facts, history, and anecdotes relating to the orange and its cultivation.

I would recommend this (modest 160-page) book to anyone fascinated by nature, history, or well-researched 'niche' subjects.

Oranges was first published in 1966. This is barely noticeable and the botanical information regarding oranges and orange trees doesn't change, but I do wish there was an update with any interesting global developments in the last 50 years.
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