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In One Person by [Irving, John]
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In One Person Kindle Edition

3.7 out of 5 stars 87 customer reviews

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Length: 450 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Description

Review

"This wonderful novel is an epic, moving survey of 70 years of sexual revolution" (The Times)

"Deeply enjoyable... a comic celebration of polymorphous perversity, and of literature" (Guardian)

"Irving has rarely written with the gorgeous poise and control he musters here" (Financial Times)

"In One Person gives a lot. It's funny, as you would expect. It's risky in what it exposes. Tolerance, in a John Irving novel is not about anything goes; it's what happens when we face our own desires honestly, whether we act on them or not" (Jeanette Winterson)

"A brave and hugely affecting depiction of how in one life (sexual and otherwise) we contain multitudes" (Elle)

Book Description

Spanning fifty years, In One Person is an breathtaking examination of sexual identity

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2147 KB
  • Print Length: 450 pages
  • Publisher: Transworld Digital (10 May 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007NG935C
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars 87 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #89,218 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
"In One Person" is a sensitive story of sexual identity, narrated by a bisexual writer who is now in his later years, recalling not only his own coming to terms with his sexuality and attraction to men, women and transgenders while at school in a New England school, but also his later years and the devastating impact of the AIDS virus in 1980s America. At times the content is quite graphic, but John Irving captures the outsider's feelings beautifully in this tale of secrecy in a confusing world of identity.

Irving is always at his best when it comes to writing about outsiders and is at his most effective when he writes with passion and anger at the treatment of those individuals. It's somewhat ironic that the late 1970s and 1980s have such a devastating impact on the theatrical characters in this story as this was the decade that saw Irving's own output reach such a consistently high standard with books such as "The World According to Garp", "A Prayer for Owen Meany" and "The Cider House Rules". Since that period his output has been more patchy, but this marks a return to something like his very best form. As partly with "Garp" its focus is on people's attitudes to sexual differences.

There are plenty of Irving standards in the book. There's the New England setting, the college life, the wrestling team, Vienna, absent parents, writers, sexual variations and the main character even has a speech impediment, albeit not quite so distinctive as Owen Meany's. As one character rails to the writer-narrator at one point: "You create all these characters who are so sexually `different' as you might call them ... and then you expect us to sympathize with them, or feel sorry for them, or something".
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Format: Hardcover
In Irving's previous novels, we encounter multi-dimensional, multi-faceted characters that engage, touch and move us. Sometimes, the background contains recurring themes (rape, violence against women, abortion) against which their lives unfold. But the story, the lives and interactions of the characters are always primary, and the message inevitably and inexorably emerges from these.
This novel, however, is a pamphlet. It feels as though Irving has decided that he has a message to impart - discrimination based on sexual orientation is wrong - and has constructed (and I use the word advisedly) a story around it. No matter how much we may agree with the central message (which I do wholeheartedly), this does not make for a good novel.
For example, in _The Hotel New Hampshire_, Irving reflects on the last sentence of a novel, and how no-one ever managed to even come close to the one of _The Great Gatsby_. I personally think he has sometimes given Fitzgerald a run for his money in this domain, most notably in _Owen Meany_. But here, almost at the end, we read the following: "My dear boy, don't put a _label_ on me - don't make me a _category_ before you get to know me." Does it get any more trite and contrived?
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By Mrs. K. A. Wheatley TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 26 Oct. 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I always look forward to a new book by John Irving. Reading 'Hotel New Hampshire' in my teens is still such a vivid memory for me, and I have been hooked on his work ever since. It is fair to say that over the years the quality of his work has varied quite widely and some books are way, way better than others, but he is never not interesting.

This latest book is really not one of my favourites. I enjoy his writing about people on the periphery of society. I love that he tackles differences in gender and sexuality so openly and frankly, but this novel seemed rather laboured and he did bang on a bit. The story itself, which could have been magnificent, peopled as it is by his usual cast of freaks and outsiders, who always capture the imagination, seemed drowned by the weight of polemic in what was effectively a four hundred page rant about sexuality. I stuck with it to the end because I love Irving dearly, but unlike some of his other work, this is not one of his books that I will be rereading.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'm a huge John Irving fan - I live for his next novel. So imagine my disappointment with this latest offering. I agree with all the other 3-star reviewers;this is one to forget. The Shakespeare references were interesting but, to me, pretty pointless. The characters were so unbelievable. And there seemed very little direction to the story. Why the AIDS history lesson? Nothing seemed to work and nothing within the novel was very interesting. A big let down but as it's Irving it deserves 3 stars - just.
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Format: Paperback
It is with a very heavy heart I write this review.
John Irving has been my favourite Author for thirty years. One of the great Post War American authors. Challenging, funny, pathos all mixed up. Sadly his 21st century books are far out weighed by his 20th century novels.
I have left reading this book because Twisted River was so bad.....I wish I hadn't picked it up.
This book is a mess. No real story line, boring unsympathetic characters, zero humour, a never ending & tedious moralising tone.
I think he has finished the themes of transexuals (genders), wrestling and historical timelines for ever. Its most common storyline is who has died this page.
This one will go in the Charity pile, never to be re-read. I skipped through the last 100 pages as I was so bored.
I will have to re-visit some of his other work to cheer me up and to re-convince me that he is a class author.
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