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K9 Series One Volume One. [DVD]

3.9 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Philippa Coulthard, Keegan Joyce, Robert Moloney, Daniel Webber, Robyn Moore
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: Brightspark
  • DVD Release Date: 31 Jan. 2011
  • Run Time: 450 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B004EJ006M
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 120,585 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

TV s Most loved Robot dog K9 blasts back into action via a Space Time Manipulator and arrives in the late 21st Century in a London scarred by Alien Intrusion and Government rule through a Cybernetic Police Force.

K9 is a cybernetic construct from the 50th Century and has the appearance of an earth dog both in shape and size. He arrives at the home of Professor Gryffen, a renowned cybernetics and temporal dynamics expert who is working on the Alien Space-Time-Manipulator (STM) which opens a portal to anywhere in space and time. K9 is following a group of rogue Aliens, Jixen Warriors who attack Gryffen and a couple of teenagers; Starkey a homeless rebel and Jorjie, a very capable intelligent young girl.

To save them K9 sacrifices himself and explodes, soon followed by his regeneration thanks to a strange alien device implanted in his mainframe. The new look K9 can now hover and fly and has more capabilities than ever before. K9 loses his long term memory and begins a quest to not only protect humanity but to discover more about his time and Space travelling past.

The year is 2059 and the Earth has suffered at the hands of natural disasters and the world government s have developed cybernetic technology and replaced human police and security forces with Cybernetic Civil Pacification Corps (The CCPC) who are controlled by the sinister Department .

The Department have divisions run by Inspectors who control Public Order and Alien and Paranormal activity.

Alongside Gryffen s errand boy, Darius the teens are destined to become K9 s companions in the battle against repression by the Department and the ongoing intrusion by Alien Life forms.

The series features many new and bizarre Alien menaces from beyond Time and Space as well as some evil home grown human adversaries.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
So the consensus here seems to be that this series has been a bit of a flop; the appalling 'British' accents the primarily Australian cast have adopted grate continually, whilst the iffy production values and feeble script don't help matters at all. However, I will say that the 'tin dog' himself, after regenerating into his new streamlined form, looks great and still has the best lines. With John Leeson on board this still feels like part of the Doctor Who world, and his chirpy tones took me right back to the robot dog's 1970s heyday.
Of the two discs in this box, I found the second one to be vastly improved; perhaps due to the characters bedding-in, or perhaps due to some better storylines. I'll certainly give Volume Two a go, and hopefully the series will have a chance to develop further through the commissioning of a second season.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Spin-offs from Doctor Who are difficult to get right because supporting characters rarely have enough development to merit a show of their own. While 'The Sarah Jane Adventures' strikes the right balance of original adventures and connections to the parent series, the producers of this series had their work cut out, with a robot dog and no crossovers with 'Doctor Who' allowed, and provide a good example of how bad the SJA could have been.

Early episodes do not provide much encouragement. The acting is often as shaky as the accents, and you wonder why K9 couldn't have landed in Australia instead, so we didn't have to grimace through initially-inexperienced young actors getting to grips with new accents along with their new roles. Still, this is London many years from now, and it's no stretch to imagine that the accents of Britain might have picked up an Antipodean twang or two in the intervening decades. Sadly, the scriptwriters have K9 acting rather out-of-character at times - though we can put this down to his scrambled memory - and at least his new ability to fly solves a fundamental mobility problem that plagued his time on 'Doctor Who' right from day one. Equally welcome is the wonderful John Leeson, who was the original voice of K9. I can't forgive the odd bone design on K9's front panel, though.

Thankfully, things improve a little over the course of the series, which at times threatens to become a really great adventure series. But with cardboard characters and very little budget, the cast and crew struggle to find interesting things to do. There are some shockingly poor performances here and there at times, and plots that would rarely engage any but the youngest viewers.
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Format: DVD
In concept a K9 spin-off sounds like a brilliant idea, and it is, but the problem with this show however is it's had no funding or licensing by the BBC, and as such any mention of Doctor Who or its universe are out of the question, even though there have been one or two very minor references. This means when you watch it you get no sense that this is part of the same universe Doctor Who, Torchwood and The Sarah Jane Adventures occupy.

Whilst I give enormous credit to original K9 creator Bob Baker for finally getting the series running, after years in development, I can't understand why he didn't stop and notice that this has very little relation to the original K9 and would destroy the whole point of a K9 spin-off.

As others have said the actors are all Australian, but because the show is set in a near-future London the actors fake an English accent and it's blindingly obvious too and in many cases they're worse than Nicola Bryant's attempt at an American accent in her first story, Planet of Fire.

In the New Series and the two spin-offs I've always been amazed at how good the visual effects and CGI are, when in comparison to US TV shows which have much higher budgets, yet the three Doctor Who shows could still rival them in the visual effects department. However with K9 it's so bad that I could easily say I've seen better in TV shows aimed at 0-3 year olds and it falls into the trap of it looking like it's just been laid on afterwards, instead of it interacting with the environment seamlessly.

Like The Sarah Jane Adventures it has a relatively low budget, but the monsters here are pale when compared because they look rubbery and just aren't believable.
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6 Comments 25 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: DVD
Seriously, this is the polar opposite of the Sarah Jane Adventures or Torchwood. Whereas those two spin-offs were intelligent, well-written and respected the audience's intelligence, this comes across as cheap, half-baked and hastily-made.
Set in future London but filmed in a warehouse in Brisbane, it tells the story of an agoraphobic professor who has a time-portal in his house, through which appear some rubbery monsters and then our favourite metal dog. Deciding the only way to stop the marauding costumes is suicide, K9 promptly self-destructs, only to regenerate into his new form - a chunky, flying, mostly-CGI oddity. Another few teenagers randomly turn up and stay for no discernible plot reasons, and they all end up fighting new rubber monsters and/or bad CGI wraiths every episode.
Several plot strands start promisingly but then get abandoned by the next episode, and K9's new abilities border on the ridiculous. The acting is uniformly terrible, with dodgy English accents being mangled by all the (obviously) Australian actors. Which begs the question, why not just set the programme in Australia to begin with? The special effects are generally poor, with the aforementioned rubber suited monsters looking worse than some of the 70's efforts in Doctor Who. The plots start off as fairly non-descript monster-of-the-week stand-alones. Later episodes try and build up a villanous shadowy organisation, but this is hamstrung by bad acting and ludicrous plot developments. Slapstick is favoured over story, endings are rushed and characterisation gets thrown out the window.
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