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The One Hundred by [Ahmad, Zia]
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The One Hundred Kindle Edition

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Length: 306 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 591 KB
  • Print Length: 306 pages
  • Publisher: Indus Valley Press (3 Dec. 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B006HTH74K
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,290,452 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Brought to life in a very thought provoking manner
How easy it is to forget things that don't happen on your door step
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.9 out of 5 stars 20 reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read 20 Dec. 2016
By Webbing - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a heartbreaking story told extremely well by the author. I can't believe this book is not on the New York times best seller list and getting ready to be made into a movie.
5.0 out of 5 stars The One Hundred 16 April 2012
By Donald Schell - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read Zia Ahmad's "The One Hundred" on a flight from San Francisco to Tokyo. I didn't even check the movie selection on the plane because the book wouldn't let me go. The flight was over and the book completed in moments, the powerful novel about street kids in Lahore, Pakistan remains, one of those reading experiences that lingers and continues to open up in new reflections and continuing discovery. Writing from the perspective of homeless kids on the street, Zia gives us poignant glimpses of how they got there as he takes us deeply into their struggles, friendships, and aching vulnerability.

The book deserves wide attention. In coming weeks I'll continue to think about how we see children, who we treat as real people, and what voices of witness or suffering we (or respectable people in Lahore or the police or anyone) pay attention to.

"The One Hundred" faces into the darkest aspects of cruelty and our human failure to see one another's humanity. The story unfolds in tragedies as people with power over others rationalize choices that harm them, and that's the everyday world of the street kids. But at the center is a monster whose rationalizing has become systematic, conscious destruction. The story's mainspring is the kids and the community's dawning realization that children are disappearing as they have never disappeared before. And we, the readers, know that there is a mass murderer preying on those who are invisible to respectable people and for whom the police are simply an enemy. With that central dilemma "The One Hundred" takes us to a surprisingly compassionate exploration of the revenge motive, which appears in the lives of these children who live beyond hope or justice as a spark or promise of hope and dignity.

This story is a page turner, but more as well. Zia Ahmad as a storyteller shows that kind of holy mercilessness that won't let us trust love until we see what the world looks like when we deny it. The world he takes us to is suspenseful, comic, edgy, but the he manages those narrative qualities evoked vision like Dostoyevsky's and Dickens' starkly comic moral writers who managed to write wildly popular books that face directly into real evil and still teach hope and touch joy. "The One Hundred" is a book of real love and respect for people whose lives and very humanity are at risk day to day and for whom a gang may be the clearest glimpse of community and grace they'll find. Zia Ahmad manages to take us into that territory and make us grateful to be taken there. In seeming hopelessness and hell, we make discoveries about the shape of hope and dignity and freedom.
4.0 out of 5 stars A compelling read 30 Jun. 2013
By Coach Sonia - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I couldn't put this book down. It's a very compelling read about an extremely important and difficult issue: street children. Although it wasn't always easy to read, I found it contained lots of examples of the love and care the street children showed to each other when they found it in few other places. The book raises up a serious issue that we need to be aware is real in many countries of the world. Zia Ahmad not only crafts a good story, based on a true situation; but his descriptions are so colorful that I felt I was right there in Lahore, in the streets, in the huge pipes some children call home and in all the places about which he wrote. I highly recommend this book, and I hope Ahmad will write another one soon.
5.0 out of 5 stars Your Next Book Club Choice 1 Oct. 2012
By LauraLAX - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
In 1999, over 100 "street urchins" disappeared in the city of Lahore, Pakistan. The facts of this true story provide the skeleton of a novel which is fleshed out with details of boys living homeless and abused on the streets of Pakistan, women struggling to survive under the harsh rules of the Taliban, police corruption, and families torn apart by circumstances over which they had no control.

Much like THE KITE RUNNER, A THOUSAND SPLENDID SUNS, and THE BOOKSELLER OF KABUL, this book provides a devastating glimpse into the lives of people we Americans normally only hear about in terms of terrorism ~ and the resulting revelation is that there are real people living, loving, and hurting in these far-away lands that we should get to know.

A fantastic choice for your book club!
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gripping! 24 Jan. 2012
By Pastor S - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In language that is evocative and powerful the author tells a true story of tragedy and pathos. The story itself is amazing, but the way it is related in this new book is gripping. Zia has a wonderful way of writing that draws one into the story. Once begun, I couldn't put it down, but had to see it through to the last mesmerizing page. The way the story is told indicates to me that it deserves to be made into a film. A screen play would take this account to the next level. I highly recommend this book. It's not always a pretty story - but it is powerful, and reminds one of the tragic possibilities inherent in human nature.
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