£79.00
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
One-Dimensional Man: Stud... has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

One-Dimensional Man: Studies in the Ideology of Advanced Industrial Society (Routledge Classics) Hardcover – 11 Jul 2002

4.6 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£79.00
£67.10 £73.34
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£79.00 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge; New Ed edition (11 July 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415289769
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415289764
  • Product Dimensions: 19.6 x 13.4 x 3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 601,294 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

About the Author

Herbert Marcuse (1989-1979). Born in Berlin but forced to flee Germany in 1933; gained world renown during the 1960s as a philosopher, social theorist and political activist.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book is an absolute essential. Written before the outbreak of 1960s student radicalism, this book highlights the failings and controls of 'advanced industrial capitalism' comprehensively and manages to undermine opposition to his earlier theses of Freudian liberation, alienation and Marxist revisionism.

Although it's useful to read some of Marcuse's earlier texts such as 'Soviet Marxism', 'Eros and Civilisation' and the brilliant 'Reason and Revolution' they are not essential.

The premise of the book is a revisionist Marxist approach to why no revolution had occurred in society. It is staggering in it's response. It argues that the artificial production of false needs generates a false idea of freedom and liberation and this is reinforced by the technological apparatus of capitalism and social control and reinforcement. Whilst many Marxist books are fairly bland rhetoric, this book is superbly subtle, cutting and mind-expanding in it's arguments about the shaping of modern American and Western society as a totalitarian parallel. There's a phenomenal section where Marcuse argues along the lines of 'in Soviet Russia, the party controls all aspects of life, making it totalitarian, in captialist America, the capitalist system and hierarchy controls every aspect of life through artifical manufacturing of happiness and satisfaction through production and consumption of needs.' The book absolutely blew my mind when I first read it and opens up even more doors and inspiration the more I assess it.

In terms of radical or revolutionary politics, this book is beyond an essential, it is the BEST WRITTEN, ARGUED AND FORMULATED counter-culture revolutionary book of at least the last 50 years.
Read more ›
Comment 40 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It is difficult to know how to start a review of One-Dimensional Man. The book is such a superb intellectual tour de force that my immediate instinct is to be afraid of doing it a grave injustice - which may indeed happen. On the other hand, I enjoy reading the reviews others give to books that have engaged me, so I will assume the same is true of anyone who chooses to read this.

One-Dimensional Man reads like an academic text made accessible for the non-specialist, and it may prove difficult reading, in a few short sections, for those unfamiliar with the late drive theory of Freud - cf. the part on 'saved' libido and how it is used. Non-familiarity with Marx is probably less problematical for understanding the thrust of Marcuse's argument(s).

The core of the main argument is that the consciousness of human beings living under modern capitalism has been manipulated to secure the continuation of what is in fact the historically obsolescent domination of man by man. This manipulation has been greatly facilitated by a steep rise in living standards and the spectre of living in a Soviet society, which many erroneously believe to be the only historical alternative to capitalism (this belief too can be traced back to the general manipulation).

The manipulation is so pernicious because of its absolute character and appropriation of concepts such as 'freedom' and 'democracy'. Our needs and desires have become manufactured needs and desires, our thought manufactured thought, our behaviour manufactured behaviour.
Read more ›
1 Comment 30 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I was surpised to see this volume to be still without comment. It has been a while since I read it but it is the kind of comprehensive leftist 'critique' of politics, culture and, yep, even 'existence', that should be read by anyone seeking a deep philisophical approach to these issues. Marcuse's persepctive is persuasive. He adopts a stance which involves a total critique of man's being in capitalist society - how liberation from the alienations of this system on a personal level is the precondition for any broader change. There follows from this alot of talk about "reification", "total estangement", "the great refusal" - all pretty extreme concepts which will challenge any complacency you might have with regard to your freedom.
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Dr. Delvis Memphistopheles TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 16 July 2011
Format: Paperback
It's not the best anti authoritarian radical book but it is a welcome relief from the turgid prose of Althusser, Poulantzas, Milliband and their ilk. This actually speaks as though it is a form of communication, the writer writes so ideas can be udnerstood. It does require some building blocks, namely Marx's theory of alienation but don't spend £9K a year in tuition fees, just go to Wiki and have find a few good friends in the pub to discuss it.

the best book is Vanegeim's Revolution of Everyday Life- much more poetic and violent. This is still locked in academese.

The basic premise being we have all sold our souls to mammon and surrendered our dreams and desires, so embedded in its fluffy goose down we have forgotten who we are. Everywhere alienated consumption has invaded our lives that we have split our personalities to into performed roles. All of these are off the peg affairs handed down as templates from the media, family, insitutions- refracted through social class ideology.

The sense of being an authentic individual has become subsumed under the new to acquire and show off, to be part of a throng, this is inculcated by the advertising industry and keeps the wheels of capital turning. It points to a malaise in late capitalism that is psychological as well as economic. This was the transcendence of the Frankfurt School over the economic deterministic viewpoints of die hard communists. The latter believed the new world would be ushered in after the revolution when the proles had the means of production. The Frankfurt School pointed out it was not so simple, the proles wanted to be bourgeois in power relationships and were not he idealised force Marx believed they were. Sexuality, gender, race, disability were all other determinants of oppression.
Read more ›
1 Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Feedback