Buy Used
£2.80
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be fulfilled same day by Amazon, is eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Delivery in the UK and 24/7 Customer Service. The book has been read, but is in very good condition. Pages are intact and the spine remains undamaged. COVER MAY VARY
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Omeros Paperback – 2005

4.8 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback, 2005
£16.99 £0.01
Available from these sellers.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Faber And Faber (2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0571144594
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571144594
  • ASIN: B0040E5FAM
  • Product Dimensions: 19.6 x 12.8 x 3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,842,079 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
8
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 9 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 27 Jun. 2001
Format: Paperback
This book one a prize or two, and attracted a lot of attention for Walcott. Maybe it was the book that swung him the Nobel Prize. There were, of course, severe critics. Craig Raine, for example. Does anyone remember that review: 'With Walcott, Homer means Coma...' No, he didn't like it. Which is his loss, I guess. But then, Walcott has always been received better in the US than he has in the UK. Readers here are perhaps uncomfortable about Walcott's tendency to speak 'for' the people of his Caribbean. But then again, maybe it is inappropriate for white middle class readers here to expect a diffidence more in line with their own etiquette than that of the West Indies, which is, of course, trying to assert an emerging identity, rather than trying to modestly demur from an Imperialist one. (Though there are British writers who employ similar strategies - Tony Harrison, for example) I don't think there have been many intelligent British readings of Walcott. Another problem is maybe a tendency for this writer to be serious, or, worse still for some people, 'earnest'. 'Omeros' can be a grave book. It plays with a tragic and an epic dimension: it renders the sufferings of ordinary Caribbean individuals with great care and sympathy. Don't be deceived. There is a subtle wit and humour always at work with Walcott. But perhaps what's most valuable about this book is the way it encourages us to readdress the classics as well, and ask the old questions about race, heroism, honour, home, identity, history and countless other timeless themes. You'll need to read and re-read this one. Walcott has a subtle accumulative power. His stanzas wash back and forth like waves against the shore. What at first might appear ordinary slowly begins to take on a deeper and deeper dimension. Go on. Make the effort. Books like this don't get written very often.
Comment 30 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I didn't know the work of Derek Walcott until I ran into this book. What an amazing book it is! I used to dislike epic poems - they usually just ramble on and on, preferably made to rhyme in the correct places but in such a way that all life is taken out of the lines. This book is different & its author is no less than a genius.

Sometimes I can't really grasp the meaning of a passage, but it doesn't really matter - each page in this book is so full of the most brilliant images & visions, that it almost seems like a book in itself. And although it's so impossibly rich in smells, colours & sounds, it never succumbs, thank God, to the kind of self-importance that sometimes overshadows the work of other truly great writers.
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Make no mistake, this is not easy-going. But it is an unbelievably rich and rewarding read, if you persevere. On the basis of this poem alone, Walcott deserves the accolades he's received. It is wonderfully refreshing to read a writer who embraces different cultures, and avoids banal stereotypes or resorting to nostalgia. The poem is not merely a rewriting of Homer, but it is Walcott engaging with history, bringing down the classic from its lofty heights and applying it to ordinary people. For these fishermen, their Odyssey is the happenings of their daily lives.
My one criticism of this poem would be the inclusions of the anaphoric references to the Native Indians. To me, these parts are not completely successful, they detract from the central plot. This is but a slight detraction, though. The great strength of 'Omeros' is, without doubt, Walcott's writing. His verse is quite simply beautiful. While you may find yourself lost in the plot, you can't help but get lost in his language, and I mean this in a good way. It has a richness, a mellifluousness that seeps through the stanzas. This richness is echoed in the descriptions of St. Lucia itself, the indigenous flora, fauna, sea and sky combine to construct an image of a most beautiful island. However, language has a more powerful role in 'Omeros'. As the narrator tells us, 'this language carries its cure/its radiant affliction'. In contrast to its colonial past, the language is used as a freer, not enslaver. This is a poem about healing, about history, ancestry and about ordinary human-beings. There is an elation in this poem which is captivating. It is beautiful, breathtaking. Read it.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Absolutely delightful to read again and discover much autobiographical St Lucia content - now I can see this as the sequel volume of autobiography of which "Another Life" was the first (for "Another Life" I recommend Edward Baugh's Annotated edition, which for me became the key to Walcott). For example, Omeros Chapter 32 is a moving tribute to his mother . . "frail as a swift, gripping the verandah . . it was another country . . . I knew but could not connect with my mind, like my mother's amnesia; untranslatable answers . . ." Somehow I think that these epic poems should be read as two volumes of one work, one life, the life of Derek Walcott.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Not a collection of poetry, but an epic novel in verse. It must take some confidence, on the part of an author, to write consciously in the tradition of Homer, Virgil, Dante and Milton, but that is exactly what Walcott does here, continuing a conversation that began more than 2000 years ago, and bringing the New World into this conversation. There are echoes of James Joyce’s “Ulysses” in the way in which Walcott incorporates the everyday lives of ordinary people into his narrative (much of the story centres around the St Lucian fishermen, Hector and Achille, rivals in love for a housemaid named Helen; and around a pig-farmer named Dennis Plunkett, a former soldier who regrets the passing of the British Empire), but Walcott and his characters also meditate on the history of their homelands, with reflections on the Transatlantic slave-trade, the 18th Century battle for the Caribbean between Britain & France; and the treatment of native peoples in North America. Most of the narrative is written in hexameter (with some passages in pentameter), but rhyme is used only sporadically, giving this poetic narrative a surprisingly modern feel. The characters and the landscape leap off the pages of this gloriously crafted work, which deserves to endure for as long as the works that inspired it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Look for similar items by category


Feedback