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The Old Ways: A Journey on Foot by [Macfarlane, Robert]
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The Old Ways: A Journey on Foot Kindle Edition

4.2 out of 5 stars 268 customer reviews

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Review

A wonderful book: Macfarlane has a rare physical intelligence, and his writing affords total immersion in place, elements and the passage of time -- Antony Gormley A naturalist who can unfurl a sentence with the breathless ease of a master angler, a writer whose ideas and reach far transcend the physical region he explores The New York Times Book Review [Mountains of the Mind is] a distinguished book that jolted my heart. Adventurous, passionate, intensely romantic ... fizzes with insights -- Roger Deakin A new naturalist to set beside the classics in our literature Evening Standard

Review

A wonderful book: Macfarlane has a rare physical intelligence, and his writing affords total immersion in place, elements and the passage of time -- Antony Gormley A naturalist who can unfurl a sentence with the breathless ease of a master angler, a writer whose ideas and reach far transcend the physical region he explores The New York Times Book Review [Mountains of the Mind is] a distinguished book that jolted my heart. Adventurous, passionate, intensely romantic ... fizzes with insights -- Roger Deakin A new naturalist to set beside the classics in our literature Evening Standard

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 9959 KB
  • Print Length: 374 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0147509793
  • Publisher: Hamish Hamilton (7 Jun. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0087ORP7W
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars 268 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #43,458 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
To begin with I found this a disapointing read. I expected to be impressed and enthralled - I love mountains, I love walking, and I like erudite writing, but I found this a little difficult to get into. The writing flows, but the contents don't always work. I think this is because Macfarlane quotes from too many different sources, and it seems as if he is wanting to show you all the clever stuff he has read without saying anything himself. If you find this I say persevere, because it settles down and one or two pieces are excellent and moving (especially the penultimate chapter). This is not quite the materpiece it could have been, and whilst a good writer with some excellent passages which just float over you, MacFarlane is occasionally heavy handed. Sometimes he takes you with him, but on other occasions you are a more distant observer. Also, whilst there is a general topic of walking it does not quite hang together as a coherent whole. It is shame in a way, because had more of it been like the end of the book and less like the start and this could have been a masterpiece. However, it is still worth four stars and my criticism is less that it is not good, but not as good as it could have been. I would still recommend it as a pleasing, intellectual and yet generally easy read.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This book has taken me a good long while to read my way through, mainly because it is so beautifully written but can be quite hard going at times as well! Part travelogue, part history book, part anecdotes, all fascinating, this is a really great book to add to the shelf of anyone with a love for travel and local history, especially where the travelling is done on foot!

Beginning and ending in the UK, the book covers the author's travels through places as diverse as the Icknield Way, the Broomway and Scottish and Hebridean sea travels, all the way over to Israel, Spain and the mountains of Sichuan to name but a few, and is full of musings on the nature of man and mankind and where we intersect with the land, and what walking on the land means to us. A wonderful, moving and lyrical book that really changes your perspective on the world and where you fit into it, and makes you itch to put on your walking boots and reconnect with the land around you.

Highly recommended, but not easy reading - I read a chapter, then mulled it over for a few days, then read another chapter and so on and so forth. Keep a dictionary to hand when you read, and a notebook, because you will almost certainly find references to other authors, historians and poets that you will want to go away and read after this book!
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This book completes Robert Macfarlane's trilogy of exploratory works of nature writing. If you are familiar with his previous work, it's worth my saying that in tone and content this is somewhere between The Wild Places and Mountains of the Mind. It is a personal exploration, but also contains a great deal of history and research.

In The Old Ways Macfarlane examines the routes that mark - and in many cases lie submerged within or beneath - the British landscape. And not just the British landscape, but Spain and Palestine too. He draws out the connections between pathways and stories, reflecting on the different kinds of thinking and writing there have been inspired by travelling on foot.

Macfarlane is a lyrical, eloquent writer, whose portfolio of interests encompasses art, geology, map-making, poetry, environmentalism and adventure. As he goes about this he is guided by the spirits of many who have gone before him; perhaps the most significant of these is the poet Edward Thomas, with the artist Eric Ravilious another.

This is both a book about journeys and a journey in its own right - into the past, but also into the self. It is scholarly, informative, moving and thought-provoking. Highly recommended to existing fans, and it will probably create a new fanbase, especially among those who admire really finely crafted writing.
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By Sentinel TOP 500 REVIEWER on 28 April 2012
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I was very pleased to get this proof copy to review, as walking is probably my favourite exercise (mind as well as body!). I've also enjoyed reading Roger Deakin, and had just finished Kathleen Jamie's haunting new collection Sightlines. As if I wasn't ready enough to love this book in advance, Macfarlane's vast canvas embraces East Anglia, where I now live, the Hebrides, the Cairngorms, the South Downs, Himalaya,and many other locations, plus a large dollop of Edward Thomas, as 'guiding spirit', all important touchstones for me. Yet I write this review with a sad heart. How can this be possible?

One of my fundamental problems was that I felt oddly distanced by the author's structure and language. I wanted to enjoy his company as guide, and to 'feel' the experience through his eyes, but was only occasionally successful. Partly this was because whenever his walk started to develop some momentum, he would detour into a name-checked digression about aspects of journey/pilgrimage which became increasingly repetitive over time, or would introduce one of a cast of characters/artists/eccentrics, who failed to illuminate/enrich the experience for me.

Nor does his language help the reader share his vision, as too often I felt it unnecessarily complex ("the boustrophedon motion of a path" or "everywhere..were pivot-points and fulcrums,symmetries and proliferations; the thorax points of a winged world"). This combination of excess and unnecessary complication also bedevils many of his metaphors and similies, with sunlight being a "thin magnesium burn-line". For me, these erected barriers causing me to scratch my head, distancing me from the setting, and my sense of companionship.
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