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Oedipus Rex (Dover Thrift Editions) by [Sophocles]
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Oedipus Rex (Dover Thrift Editions) Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 24 customer reviews

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Length: 66 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled Page Flip: Enabled

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Review

"A great work of world literature has at last become a great poem in English. Mulroy's translation is far superior to other available English verse translations." --Robert J. Rabel, editor of "Approaches to Homer, Ancient and Modern"

About the Author

David Mulroy is professor of classics at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He has translated "The Complete Poetry of Catullus," also published by the University of Wisconsin Press. Sophocles (ca. 497/6-407/6 BCE) was the most acclaimed dramatist of his era, winning more than twenty festival competitions in ancient Athens. He is believed to have written 123 plays, but only seven have survived in a complete form.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 378 KB
  • Print Length: 66 pages
  • Publisher: Dover Publications; Unabridged edition (29 Feb. 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008TVLU1K
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 24 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #180,915 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
"Oedipus The King" ("Oedipus Rex") is not only the most read of all the Greek tragedies, it is also the most misread of the Greek dramas. The play's reputation exists in part because it was presented as the paragon of the dramatic form by Aristotle in his "Poetics," and it may well be because of that fact that "Oedipus The King" was one of the relatively few plays by Sophocles to be passed down from ancient times. When I have taught Greek tragedies in various classes students have reconsidered the play in terms of key concepts such as harmartia ("tragic error of judgment"), angonrisis ("recognition"), peripeteia ("reversal"), catharsis, etc., and they usually agree this play provides the proverbial textbook examples of these terms.
However, I was always bothered by the fact that Sophocles engages in some rather heavy-handed foreshadowing regarding the fact that the play's tragic hero is going to blind himself before the conclusion. The lines were closer to, dare I say, sophomoric humor than eloquently setting up the climax. But then I read something very, very interesting in Homer's "Iliad," where there appears a single reference to Oedipus which suggests that he died in battle. Remember now that Homer's epics were written several hundred years before Sophocles was born and that the Greek playwrights were allowed to take great liberties with the various myths (consider the three different versions of the death of Clytemnestra at the hands of Orestes we have from Sophocles, Euripides and Aeschylus). The Athenian audience would know its Homer, but "Oedipus The King" was a new play.
This leads me to advance a very interesting possibility: the Greek audience did not know that Oedipus was going to blind himself. This was a new idea.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Oedipus the King is one of the classic works of Western literature. It was originally written as a play in around 429 BC by Sophocles (~496-406 BC), a Greek philosopher and playwright. It took the Greek world by storm, and has been handed down to future generations who have also been greatly influenced by it. Most notably in modern times, Sigmund Freud (1856-1939) took this work as pointing toward a deep-rooted psychosis, the Oedipus Complex.
Oedipus the King (also known as Oedipus Rex or Oedipus Tyrannus) is the story of Oedipus, the king of Thebes, which is suffering under a horrific plague. Finding out that the god Apollo has laid the plague on the city until it should punish the murderer of its previous king, Oedipus pronounces a curse on the murderer and sets out to discover who the murderer was. Sadly for Oedipus, there is fate upon fate wrapped up in this mystery, and doom upon doom.
This book, is not merely a translation of Oedipus the King, instead it is an "acting version," created by the Stratford Shakespearian Festival Company of Canada for High School level students. The book begins with an introduction to Sophocles and Greek theatre, and after the play are copious notes, critical excerpts and questions for discussion. The play itself was written so that a young reader, with no background understanding of Greek theatre or culture will understand it.
Overall, I found this to be a great book. I enjoyed the information about the play a lot, and believe that it will be very helpful to any reader. But, foremost, I enjoyed the play itself. The story is powerful, and quite enthralling. I have never seen this play acted out, but do think that this translation would make it excellent. I loved this book, and highly recommend it!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Prophecy and fate feature in key roles, and perhaps a moral of it should be – do not try and cheat your fate for you will fail, and fail disastrously. Oedipus – a man who should have everything including a loving wife, a palace, and a reputation for bravery – attempts to cheat the seers who prophecy he will murder his father and marry his mother. Although the cast is fairly small and the action is over a short time, with reference to past events, it pulls in the reader quickly. One soon begins to feel for Oedipus, although he is somewhat arrogant, and by the end of the play the tragedy is all pervasive. Death, shame, fate and the whim of the gods – just what a reader needs for perhaps one of the most well-known and tragic stories from antiquity, Oedipus Rex is a play of epic proportions.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
What else is there to say? Sophocles is fantastically convoluted as always, while being completely ironic all throughout. However, I would never recommend someone read a play, they are made to be seen, and this is no difference. However, I read this for school work, and would recommend this version for that purpose.
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Format: Paperback
We are currently studying King Lear in my A level English class and have to use Oedipus Rex as a secondary text. This edition was handed out to us and was better than some of the others I've seen. The play itself was actually quite good; and surprisingly it hadn't gone 'out of date': the story was understandable and you are able to feel the tragedy and anguish of the characters.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
To hear this dramatization is really Mind opener. Many of readers for the tragedy of the Ancients should realise that while the performance in its time took place - the pregnant women miscarriage-d and youth males fainted in the intensity of the production. Well what now we have on the telly - oh again stock market schwindle and Obama 's ballet...
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