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Objective Burma [1945] [DVD]

4.1 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Actors: Errol Flynn, James Brown, William Prince, George Tobias, Henry Hull
  • Directors: Raoul Walsh
  • Writers: Ranald MacDougall, Alvah Bessie, Lester Cole
  • Producers: Jack L. Warner, Jerry Wald
  • Format: PAL, Full Screen, Black & White, Dolby, Mono
  • Language: English, Japanese
  • Subtitles: English, French, Italian, Dutch, Arabic, Romanian
  • Subtitles For The Hearing Impaired: Italian, English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.37:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: 28 Jun. 2013
  • Run Time: 135 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00009PBHO
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 20,066 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Product Description

Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

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On its first release in 1945, just after VJ day, Objective Burma came under fire in the British press--much as Saving Private Ryan would do some 40 years later--for portraying the jungle war as a solely American operation. But the passage of time has allowed the movie's many merits to outshine its narrow remit. The movie's bone-chilling portrayal of pain, sacrifice and endurance is astonishing; the jungle atmosphere is so persuasive you'd swear it was shot on the actual locations; and you'll never forget the terrifying last dark night on a mountainside--or the crocodiles.

A paratroop captain (Errol Flynn) sets out with a platoon to attack a Japanese outpost in the jungle. The Americans reach their target, take out the enemy with almost balletic precision, then gear up to return home. This feels like the point when a conventional war movie would have reached its action-filled climax, but the journey has only begun. Ahead lies one of the most arduous and agonising adventures any World War II film ever offered, brilliantly directed by that underrated old master Raoul Walsh and photographed with almost tactile realism by the great James Wong Howe. Franz Waxman also contributes one of his finest music scores. Flynn is excellent (he had given his best performance ever in Walsh's Gentleman Jim three years earlier), and he's backed by a solid cast including Henry Hull (as an ageing war correspondent), James Brown, William Prince, George Tobias and Stephen Richards (soon to change his name to Mark Stevens). Incidentally, two of the writers, Alvah Bessie and Lester Cole, were later blacklisted; see if you can spot any Commie propaganda. --Richard T Jameson

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

By Victor HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 10 Jan. 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
There are many types of war film - the boys own adventure sort (such as Where Eagles Dare), the shockingly viscerally realistic (Saving Private Ryan), and attempts to dramatise real events (The Longest Day, A Bridge Too Far). Generally I like them all in one way or another, but what really gets my interest are films that show the human cost of war, films that show how ordinary people are forced by circumstance to extraordinary acts, and the effect it has upon them. Films such as Cruel Sea, Dawn Patrol, and this fine effort from Errol Flynn and director Raoul Walsh.

Flynn plays Capt. Nelson, leader of a group of paratroopers sent into Burma to destroy a communications post. The mission is a success but the extraction point is overrun by Japanese and the soldiers are left to fight their way out of Burma on foot with constant harassment from the enemy. Loosely based on real events, it amalgamates parts of several well know missions including that of the Chindits.

It's a grim and gruelling film at times. The action scenes are plentiful and well staged. Due to it being filmed during the war, using real weapons, uniforms and great attention to operational detail there is quite a feeling of realism about it. But what really comes across is the character study. The effect of the hopeless situation and the brutality meted out upon the men is examined, and portrayed by Flynn and co superbly. Flynn was so often forced by the studios to portray the invincible hero, fighting off the villain with one hand whilst grabbing the girl with the other. But every now and then he managed to get his hands on a role with some depth that gave him the opportunity to show just how good an actor he really was, and this is one of those occasions.
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Format: DVD
Raoul Walsh has to be the most agonizingly undervalued of all Hollywood maestros of yore. When the time came to do 'Objective Burma' he had a glorious career behind him spanning more than 30 years, with bona fide masterworks like 'Regeneration', ’Sadie Thompson’, ’Big Trail’, ’Roaring Twenties’, ’High Sierra’ and others, and yet every second of ’Burma’ is briskly paced and enthrallingly dynamic. In his day Walsh was best known for his action sequences, but everytime you revisit his films, not least this one, you are reminded that nothing human, absolutely nothing under the sun was alien to Hawks as a person and as a director. He succeeds where almost any other director of ensemble movies fails, that is in investing every single cast member with a description that is so precise, so wellrounded and unsentimental, so unlike all the others that you actually sit there with an ache in your heart for all the knowledge, all the feel for the medium, the innate sense of pacing that seems all but lost today where almost no director, certainly no one in Hollywood, dares to communicate this intelligently. Errol Flynn is subdued, pure in his acting and so matter-of-factly heroic that it would shatter it, were he to do do a deed that was actually heroic in the contemporary Hollywood sense. His heroism is a given, but so is his fear and his insecurity.
A masterpiece of moviemaking.
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Raoul Walsh has to be the most agonizingly undervalued of all Hollywood maestros of yore. When the time came to do 'Objective Burma' he had a glorious career behind him spanning more than 30 years, with bona fide masterworks like 'Regeneration', ’Sadie Thompson’, ’Big Trail’, ’Roaring Twenties’, ’High Sierra’ and others, and yet every second of ’Burma’ is briskly paced and enthrallingly dynamic. In his day Walsh was best known for his action sequences, but everytime you revisit his films, not least this one, you are reminded that nothing human, absolutely nothing under the sun was alien to Walsh as a person and as a director. He succeeds where almost any other director of ensemble movies fails, that is in investing every single cast member with a character that is so precise, so wellrounded and unsentimental, so unlike all the others that you actually sit there with an ache in your heart for all the knowledge, all the feel for the medium, the innate sense of pacing that seems all but lost today where almost no director, certainly no one in Hollywood, dares to communicate this intelligently. Errol Flynn is subdued, pure in his acting and so matter-of-factly heroic that it would shatter it, were he to do do a deed that was actually heroic in the contemporary Hollywood sense. His heroism is a given, but so is his fear and his insecurity.
A masterpiece of moviemaking.
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With "Objective Burma" Raoul Walsh created probably the most realistic war film made while the war was still in progress. People may criticise it for being to American but the story could be applied to anywhere within the Pacific. Because it was made during the war it was probably easier to use the U.S. Army instead of having to send away for material from the British Army. The Americans did fight in Burma however and many were stationed in India.
As the Commander of the Paratroopers, Errol Flynn only has one concern on his mind: the lives of his men. The plot does not have him worry about any ex-wives or young children he has back home. There's no room for sappy sub-plots in this picture because there is already enough going on. The question is, can Flynn and his men survive attacks from the Japanese and the wild Jungle?
One problem is the film's attitude towards the Japanese but please remember it was made when the U.S. was still battling Japan in the Pacific it was made to stir the people on the home front.
The cinematogrophy brilliantly evokes the tense and stuffy atmosphere of the Jungle and you can almost picture the marching and parachute drops when you here Franz Waxman's score. Along with Flynn you have Henry Hull, George Tobias and James Brown among others each cast member contributes greatly to the finished film.
"Objective Burma" proves yet again that in his heyday Raoul Walsh was a master of cinema.
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