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Oath Of Gold: Book 3: Deed of Paksenarrion Series by [Moon, Elizabeth]
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Oath Of Gold: Book 3: Deed of Paksenarrion Series Kindle Edition

4.8 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

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Length: 512 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Description

Review

Brilliant...the excitement of high heroic adventure (BOOKWATCH)

A tour de force (JACK McDEVITT)

Book Description

The final book in Elizabeth Moon's classic The Deed of Paksenarrion saga

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1152 KB
  • Print Length: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Orbit (2 May 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00C2V4R7W
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #200,222 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This third and final installment in the trilogy "The Deed of Paksenarrion" is certainly as good or better than the other two.
Paksenarrion is a craven coward in her own mind in the beginning of this book. Through the help of the Kuakgan Oakhollow, the wounds (both physical and mental) from her bout with the Kuaknom are healed. But Paksenarrion needs to find confidence in her own abilities and she joins the Rangers of Lyonya for the summer. She finds sides with herself that she did not know that she had. In returning to the Kuakgan at the end of summer Paksenarrion is called as a paladin for all gods and has gifts endowed to her. Her first calling sends her back to the Duke and during her stay she uncovers great evil. Her second calling takes her to the kingdom of Lyonya and there she finds that the kingdom will soon be without either king or queen. Her calling is to find the king that was lost as a child.
There is no doubt that Paksenarrion has changed a great deal from the frightened person at the beginning of the book. Having had these fears enables her to understand the common folk, for most people have to live their lives without knowing what will happen next. Some of Paksenarrion's challenges in this book are a bit unbelievable, but that is the way of fantasy. An exaggeration of certain points can bring a message accross.
I certainly enjoyed this book and fantasy wraps philosophical and religious questions in an interesting package - unlike my earlier textbooks at university.
Enjoy.
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By A Customer on 21 Jun. 2002
Format: Paperback
This book concludes the series well, although it must be noted that to reach the status of Paladin, Paks has to suffer some rather grim ordeals; however, while there is suffering, Moon clearly doesn't relish the descriptions of such suffering as many authors do.
The loose ends all get tied up, and everyone gets their just desserts, so to speak. Again, the series certainly employs the AD&D style magic to good effect - it fits in quite beleivably and isn't the be all and end all of the story.
Solid characters, beleivable world setting and plenty of feeling and intrigue, worth its five star rating.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
This third and final installment in the trilogy "The Deed of Paksenarrion" is certainly as good or better than the other two.
Paksenarrion is a craven coward in her own mind in the beginning of this book. Through the help of the Kuakgan Oakhollow, the wounds (both physical and mental) from her bout with the Kuaknom are healed. But Paksenarrion needs to find confidence in her own abilities and she joins the Rangers of Lyonya for the summer. She finds sides with herself that she did not know that she had. In returning to the Kuakgan at the end of summer Paksenarrion is called as a paladin for all gods and has gifts endowed to her. Her first calling sends her back to the Duke and during her stay she uncovers great evil. Her second calling takes her to the kingdom of Lyonya and there she finds that the kingdom will soon be without either king or queen. Her calling is to find the king that was lost as a child.
There is no doubt that Paksenarrion has changed a great deal from the frightened person at the beginning of the book. Having had these fears enables her to understand the common folk, for most people have to live their lives without knowing what will happen next. Some of Paksenarrion's challenges in this book are a bit unbelievable, but that is the way of fantasy. An exaggeration of certain points can bring a message accross.
I certainly enjoyed this book. Fantasy wraps philosophical and religious questions in an interesting package - unlike my earlier textbooks at university.
Enjoy.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
This bring the trilogy to a stirring finale. The plot has been well-described by other reviewers, so I'll just add some notes which may help decide if it's for you:

- If you liked the first two volumes, you should certainly get this one: it's the most eventful and balanced of the three (volume one was pretty plain sailing for heroine Paks, volume two was pretty tough) and has all the drama that you could want.

- Unlike the heroes in many fantasy series, Paks and the other 'good' characters have flaws and difficulties to overcome, giving them greater depth and believability. There is also a choice of villains, evil in different ways, and they get a good shot at victory so you don't feel you're just rolling towards an inevitable outcome.

- There is a decidedly unpleasant torture session describing a Calvary-like five days when Paks goes through terrible horrors testing her true status as a paladin for good. There are obvious analogies to the Biblical story, which you may or may not think a good thing, but as another reviewer has noted, Moon doesn't wallow enthusiastically in the torture.

- The general atmosphere is very high fantasy a la Tolkien, but mostly with a more matter-of-fact style with some limitations in range of vocabulary - for instance, nobody ever smiles, they always "grin". The upside is that the action is rapid - unlike Tolkien, who can be very leisurely at times, this keeps us moving from one crisis to the next.

Overall: flawed but recommended.
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