OMD

Top Albums by OMD (See all 16 albums)


CD: £12.99  |  MP3: £10.49
CD: £2.99
CD: £7.24  |  MP3: £6.49
CD: £7.40  |  MP3: £7.99
CD: £6.98
CD: £8.39  |  MP3: £6.99
CD: £10.16  |  MP3: £9.90
CD: £6.60  |  MP3: £9.90
CD: £7.18  |  MP3: £7.29
See all 16 albums by OMD

All downloads by OMD
Sort by:
Bestselling
1-10 of 474
Song Title Artist Album  
30
OMD
30
OMD
30
OMD
30
Orchestral Manoeuvres In The Dark
30
OMD
30
OMD
30
OMD
30
Orchestral Manoeuvres In The Dark
30
OMD
30
OMD
Your Amazon Music account is currently associated with a different marketplace. To enjoy Prime Music, go to Your Music Library and transfer your account to Amazon.co.uk (UK).
  

Image of OMD
Provided by the artist or their representative

Latest Tweet

OfficialOMD

We will be playing at BSF in Brussels this year on 23rd August Tickets are available from http://t.co/X3u8H1GpMw http://t.co/gp3ep5bN05


Biography

‘What does the future sound like?’
‘English Electric’ is the new album from Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark
(OMD), the celebrated synth-pop duo from Wirral who pioneered their genre with
starkly experimental albums such as ‘Architecture and Morality’ (1981) and
‘Dazzle Ships’ (1983). Hits such as 'Enola Gay', ‘Maid of Orleans’ and ‘Souvenir’
propelled them into the stratosphere and helped shape the musical landscape of the
eighties. They went on to record for the John Hughes blockbuster movie Pretty in
Pink and the hit single ‘If you Leave,’ written in just a day, became a sparkling
... Read more

‘What does the future sound like?’
‘English Electric’ is the new album from Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark
(OMD), the celebrated synth-pop duo from Wirral who pioneered their genre with
starkly experimental albums such as ‘Architecture and Morality’ (1981) and
‘Dazzle Ships’ (1983). Hits such as 'Enola Gay', ‘Maid of Orleans’ and ‘Souvenir’
propelled them into the stratosphere and helped shape the musical landscape of the
eighties. They went on to record for the John Hughes blockbuster movie Pretty in
Pink and the hit single ‘If you Leave,’ written in just a day, became a sparkling
contribution to the Brat Pack canon. Influenced by Krautrock and Kraftwerk, they
signed to Factory Records in 1979 and had their iconic single and album artwork
designed by Peter Saville. Now their work provides a touchstone for artists such as
The XX, La Roux, The Killers and Arcade Fire collaborator Owen Pallett, who reworked ‘Dazzle Ships’ with nothing but a violin.
‘English Electric,’ released three years after ‘History of Modern’ (2010) and the
bands twelfth album, takes its name from a British industrial manufacturing company
and quintessentially reflects OMD’s identity; it has further resonance for Andy
McCluskey and Paul Humphreys as locomotive enthusiasts and self-confessed
‘technology geeks.’ In the eighties alongside bands like Human League, Depeche
Mode and Gary Numan, OMD made bold albums, seeking the sounds of the future
in a period of quick-fire technological change and the fast approach of a new century.
Now, in the future they tried to envisage, ‘English Electric’ reflects on how different
the world has turned out to be…
‘Please Remain Seated’ is a track reminiscent of Dazzle Ship’s ‘ABC AutoIndustry’, but an updated 21st Century version, with an Apple computerized voice
warning the listener – ‘the future that you anticipated has been cancelled.’
Andy speculates that ‘the overarching feel tends to be a sense of loss, of melancholia,
that things haven’t turned out the way you wanted them to, whether it be with
technology or personal relationships.’
…The tracks cover many different areas but together remain consistent with the
album as an idea. There are songs that use themes well known to OMD fans, Andy's
metaphorical ballad of the female historical figure (‘Helen of Troy’) as well as
Paul's’ trademark synthetic hooks, while there is a new, transitory feel as the album
moves between a time that once was and the present with an elegiac but also
speculative tone. Perhaps this is a reflection of the collaborative nature of this project
compared with ‘History of Modern’, which shuttled between Paul’s computer in
London to Andy’s in Liverpool via email.
Paul describes how this more personal form of working contributed to the overall feel
of the new album - ‘It enabled us to work like we use to work in the very early days; it
was all very spontaneous. You can’t do this kind of intense collaboration virtually. By
doing it this way again, it enabled us to go back to our initial spark and electronic

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

‘What does the future sound like?’
‘English Electric’ is the new album from Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark
(OMD), the celebrated synth-pop duo from Wirral who pioneered their genre with
starkly experimental albums such as ‘Architecture and Morality’ (1981) and
‘Dazzle Ships’ (1983). Hits such as 'Enola Gay', ‘Maid of Orleans’ and ‘Souvenir’
propelled them into the stratosphere and helped shape the musical landscape of the
eighties. They went on to record for the John Hughes blockbuster movie Pretty in
Pink and the hit single ‘If you Leave,’ written in just a day, became a sparkling
contribution to the Brat Pack canon. Influenced by Krautrock and Kraftwerk, they
signed to Factory Records in 1979 and had their iconic single and album artwork
designed by Peter Saville. Now their work provides a touchstone for artists such as
The XX, La Roux, The Killers and Arcade Fire collaborator Owen Pallett, who reworked ‘Dazzle Ships’ with nothing but a violin.
‘English Electric,’ released three years after ‘History of Modern’ (2010) and the
bands twelfth album, takes its name from a British industrial manufacturing company
and quintessentially reflects OMD’s identity; it has further resonance for Andy
McCluskey and Paul Humphreys as locomotive enthusiasts and self-confessed
‘technology geeks.’ In the eighties alongside bands like Human League, Depeche
Mode and Gary Numan, OMD made bold albums, seeking the sounds of the future
in a period of quick-fire technological change and the fast approach of a new century.
Now, in the future they tried to envisage, ‘English Electric’ reflects on how different
the world has turned out to be…
‘Please Remain Seated’ is a track reminiscent of Dazzle Ship’s ‘ABC AutoIndustry’, but an updated 21st Century version, with an Apple computerized voice
warning the listener – ‘the future that you anticipated has been cancelled.’
Andy speculates that ‘the overarching feel tends to be a sense of loss, of melancholia,
that things haven’t turned out the way you wanted them to, whether it be with
technology or personal relationships.’
…The tracks cover many different areas but together remain consistent with the
album as an idea. There are songs that use themes well known to OMD fans, Andy's
metaphorical ballad of the female historical figure (‘Helen of Troy’) as well as
Paul's’ trademark synthetic hooks, while there is a new, transitory feel as the album
moves between a time that once was and the present with an elegiac but also
speculative tone. Perhaps this is a reflection of the collaborative nature of this project
compared with ‘History of Modern’, which shuttled between Paul’s computer in
London to Andy’s in Liverpool via email.
Paul describes how this more personal form of working contributed to the overall feel
of the new album - ‘It enabled us to work like we use to work in the very early days; it
was all very spontaneous. You can’t do this kind of intense collaboration virtually. By
doing it this way again, it enabled us to go back to our initial spark and electronic

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

‘What does the future sound like?’
‘English Electric’ is the new album from Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark
(OMD), the celebrated synth-pop duo from Wirral who pioneered their genre with
starkly experimental albums such as ‘Architecture and Morality’ (1981) and
‘Dazzle Ships’ (1983). Hits such as 'Enola Gay', ‘Maid of Orleans’ and ‘Souvenir’
propelled them into the stratosphere and helped shape the musical landscape of the
eighties. They went on to record for the John Hughes blockbuster movie Pretty in
Pink and the hit single ‘If you Leave,’ written in just a day, became a sparkling
contribution to the Brat Pack canon. Influenced by Krautrock and Kraftwerk, they
signed to Factory Records in 1979 and had their iconic single and album artwork
designed by Peter Saville. Now their work provides a touchstone for artists such as
The XX, La Roux, The Killers and Arcade Fire collaborator Owen Pallett, who reworked ‘Dazzle Ships’ with nothing but a violin.
‘English Electric,’ released three years after ‘History of Modern’ (2010) and the
bands twelfth album, takes its name from a British industrial manufacturing company
and quintessentially reflects OMD’s identity; it has further resonance for Andy
McCluskey and Paul Humphreys as locomotive enthusiasts and self-confessed
‘technology geeks.’ In the eighties alongside bands like Human League, Depeche
Mode and Gary Numan, OMD made bold albums, seeking the sounds of the future
in a period of quick-fire technological change and the fast approach of a new century.
Now, in the future they tried to envisage, ‘English Electric’ reflects on how different
the world has turned out to be…
‘Please Remain Seated’ is a track reminiscent of Dazzle Ship’s ‘ABC AutoIndustry’, but an updated 21st Century version, with an Apple computerized voice
warning the listener – ‘the future that you anticipated has been cancelled.’
Andy speculates that ‘the overarching feel tends to be a sense of loss, of melancholia,
that things haven’t turned out the way you wanted them to, whether it be with
technology or personal relationships.’
…The tracks cover many different areas but together remain consistent with the
album as an idea. There are songs that use themes well known to OMD fans, Andy's
metaphorical ballad of the female historical figure (‘Helen of Troy’) as well as
Paul's’ trademark synthetic hooks, while there is a new, transitory feel as the album
moves between a time that once was and the present with an elegiac but also
speculative tone. Perhaps this is a reflection of the collaborative nature of this project
compared with ‘History of Modern’, which shuttled between Paul’s computer in
London to Andy’s in Liverpool via email.
Paul describes how this more personal form of working contributed to the overall feel
of the new album - ‘It enabled us to work like we use to work in the very early days; it
was all very spontaneous. You can’t do this kind of intense collaboration virtually. By
doing it this way again, it enabled us to go back to our initial spark and electronic

This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.

Improve This Page

If you’re the artist, management or record label, you can update your biography, photos, videos and more at Artist Central.

Get started at Artist Central

Feedback

Check out our Artist Stores FAQ
Send us feedback about this page