Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £3.88
includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

O'Baby by [Johnson, Geoffrey]
Kindle App Ad

O'Baby Kindle Edition

3.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£3.88

Length: 166 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled Page Flip: Enabled

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

Synopsis

IN

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 3068 KB
  • Print Length: 166 pages
  • Publisher: Berkley (1 April 1999)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00316UNAW
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #540,445 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By Peter Uys HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 10 Jun. 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This charming name book will assist parents in choosing the appropriate Celtic name for their baby as it provides an extensive list of evocative Irish names. But why an Irish name? For some reason, this musical language and the magical legends of Ireland have become very popular in the Anglo-Saxon world and further afield. The introduction discusses trends in the giving of names and mentions the most popular current Irish names. The chapter Little Dark One provides a cursory history of the settling of Ireland by the Celts and then lists and explains suitable names for dark haired people, such as Darcy, Douglas and Duane. . The next chapter discusses and lists the retranslation back into Irish, of popular Anglophonic names and also provides a list of Irish names with their English translations. The A - Z index lists all the names and their meanings/histories alphabetically and is followed by a calendar of saints' feast days. This interesting read and valuable reference work concludes with a thorough index.
Comment 27 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
A rich and resourceful guide. I learned so much about Irish history too. When Caitlin grows up I'll pass along this book to her.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I wasnt wild about how this book is laid out and some of the names are just far too old and out of time that i didnt feel that inspird.Perhaps im just frustrated that i havent found a baby name yet and will keep looking for an irish name.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 15 July 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Surprisingly erudite. We chose Maeve.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x9535bab0) out of 5 stars 23 reviews
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x94155e70) out of 5 stars Great for reading and reference 10 Jun. 2003
By Peter Uys - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This charming name book will assist parents in choosing the appropriate Celtic name for their baby as it provides an extensive list of evocative Irish names. But why an Irish name? For some reason, this musical language and the magical legends of Ireland have become very popular in the Anglo-Saxon world and further afield. The introduction discusses trends in the giving of names and mentions the most popular current Irish names. The chapter Little Dark One provides a cursory history of the settling of Ireland by the Celts and then lists and explains suitable names for dark haired people, such as Darcy, Douglas and Duane. In the chapter The Fairest Of Them All there's mention of the Tuatha De Danaan and a discussion of names like Barry, Finbar, Kelly, etc. Red haired people are treated in the next chapters, where some of the more common names are Rory and Rowan, whilst the next chapter deals with names deriving from the root words for light or brightness; these include Aidan and Keegan. A Celtic Menagerie provides names that are connected with animal names or qualities: here you will find Colm, Conan, Conor, Oscar and Ronan. In the chapter titled The Green Isle, names derived from plants are given, including Darren and Tyrone. Warrior names in the next chapter include Casey, Fergal and Kane. Wednesday's Child provides names for less worthy traits, like Doran, Etain and Kennedy. Banshee names include Bevin, Cliona and Una, while names invented by authors include Fiona, Gulliver, Imogen and Vanessa. The next chapter discusses and lists the retranslation back into Irish, of popular Anglophonic names and also provides a list of Irish names with their English translations. The A - Z index lists all the names and their meanings/histories alphabetically and is followed by a calendar of saints' feast days. This interesting read and valuable reference work concludes with a thorough index.
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x94423864) out of 5 stars Very Full for Such a Little Book 31 Jan. 2003
By Irish Flair - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I found this book to be quite helpful and full of information. I did expect it to be bigger, as in a physically larger book, but for it's size it is chock-a-block with names.
The book is divided up into sections so that you can find a name based on Irish animals, myths, saints, legends, etc and dark, light or red hair. Then there is a complete name listing from A to Z, a list that translates Irish names to English and another that does English to Irish.
What I especially liked was that the author gave you the Irish name, often an alternative spelling (ie. older or more tradish Irish), how to pronounce the name, whether it is for a boy or girl and Anglicanized alternative spelling(s). Each name has a short story about where it came from, what is it's meaning and any other names it is related to.
This is a great reference guide and enjoyable to simply read, too.
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x958fda58) out of 5 stars Puts other name-books to shame! 5 Oct. 2001
By Susannah Cullen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is a literary and unusual name-book - well worth a look if you want to give your child, dog or goldfish an Irish name, but a fascinating read even for the non-parent because of the history of these beautiful names and the interesting way in which the author has grouped them. There are names for redheads, blondes and brunettes, names for warriors and gentlefolk, artistic names, and many others. This is a small gem and a triumph of research. I wish Mr Johnson would give us a similar insight into Native American names or even English names. Anything by this thoughtful writer would be worth reading.
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9d9887a4) out of 5 stars A rich and resourceful guide. 14 July 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
A rich and resourceful guide. I learned so much about Irish history too. When Caitlin grows up I'll pass along this book to her.
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x9494233c) out of 5 stars Rough at best 16 Sept. 2003
By Domhnall O'Donnchadha - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Only mildly accurate, the clumsy mix of true Gaelic forms along with Anglicizations leaves me a bit put off. This might make it useful to many, but it is not at all formal in structure. There are also some names with variations given that are just ridiculously old. Noone uses the root 'dub' in place of 'dubh.' Some truly ancient names are included, but their selections are random. It appears to be mostly gloss from a few limited sources.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know
click to open popover