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Notting Hill Behind The Scenes Paperback – Illustrated, 1 Oct 2007

4.4 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: BehindTheScenesPublishing.Com; First Edition edition (1 Oct. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0955665906
  • ISBN-13: 978-0955665905
  • Package Dimensions: 24.2 x 18.8 x 1.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 685,809 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Product description

Review

Notting Hill Behind the Scenes (Hermione Cameron) follows the familiar format of showing us what a particular place was like a century ago. The format is a well-established and simple one: the postcard illustrations have the starring role, and the introduction and captions serve as footnotes, a touch of extra detail for the observer. Yet Hermione Cameron's production has a couple of features which make this a stand-out book in the genre. She's gone in search of the people who populated the streets all those years ago, and she makes us look at them, too, by the trick of giving us some of the pictures twice, the second time with part of the detail magnified. It's a double-take that has you flitting from the general to the particular and back again, and above all makes the characters come alive. We all love those 'animated' street scenes. The author's in your face treatment of Notting Hill's Edwardian residents is a thought-provoking master stroke. The introduction instantly focuses on the inhabitants rather than the buildings and their history. She gives us Miss Perfect, William Jealous and the Madders sisters, people we meet later, along with many other residents. 'Seeing a familiar street all those years ago made me wonder about the past overlapping with the present: how we may walk in someone else's footsteps, turn the same street corner, pass the same shop and cross the same road, and do all this a century apart.' So, half a century before Marc Bolan lived at 57 Blenheim Crescent, Emily Needham was a dressmaker there. Henry Armfield, a dyer and cleaner, is brought to life outside his shop by the magnification technique and assumes a stature that he can never do in the original picture. The captions, too, investigate the human side of Notting Hill, probing the people who ran the shops, lived in houses and worked in businesses. Even if you begin by not knowing Notting Hill, you're soon inside it, an inquisitive voyeur. Beats Albert Square any day." -- Picture Postcard Monthly, December 2007 "A Stand-out Book in the Genre"

"A Stand-out Book in the Genre... Notting Hill Behind the Scenes (Hermione Cameron) follows the familiar format of showing us what a particular place was like a century ago. The format is a well-established and simple one: the postcard illustrations have the starring role, and the introduction and captions serve as footnotes, a touch of extra detail for the observer. Yet Hermione Cameron's production has a couple of features which make this a stand-out book in the genre. She's gone in search of the people who populated the streets all those years ago, and she makes us look at them, too, by the trick of giving us some of the pictures twice, the second time with part of the detail magnified. It's a double-take that has you flitting from the general to the particular and back again, and above all makes the characters come alive. We all love those 'animated' street scenes. The author's in your face treatment of Notting Hill's Edwardian residents is a thought-provoking master stroke. The introduction instantly focuses on the inhabitants rather than the buildings and their history. She gives us Miss Perfect, William Jealous and the Madders sisters, people we meet later, along with many other residents. 'Seeing a familiar street all those years ago made me wonder about the past overlapping with the present: how we may walk in someone else's footsteps, turn the same street corner, pass the same shop and cross the same road, and do all this a century apart.' So, half a century before Marc Bolan lived at 57 Blenheim Crescent, Emily Needham was a dressmaker there. Henry Armfield, a dyer and cleaner, is brought to life outside his shop by the magnification technique and assumes a stature that he can never do in the original picture. The captions, too, investigate the human side of Notting Hill, probing the people who ran the shops, lived in houses and worked in businesses. Even if you begin by not knowing Notting Hill, you're soon inside it, an inquisitive voyeur. Beats Albert Square any day." -- Picture Postcard Monthly, December 2007

"A Stand-out Book in the Genre... Notting Hill Behind the Scenes follows the familiar format of showing us what a particular place was like a century ago. The format is a well-established and simple one: the postcard illustrations have the starring role, and the introduction and captions serve as footnotes, a touch of extra detail for the observer. Yet Hermione Cameron's production has a couple of features which make this a stand-out book in the genre. She's gone in search of the people who populated the streets all those years ago, and she makes us look at them, too, by the trick of giving us some of the pictures twice, the second time with part of the detail magnified. It's a double-take that has you flitting from the general to the particular and back again, and above all makes the characters come alive. We all love those 'animated' street scenes. The author's in your face treatment of Notting Hill's Edwardian residents is a thought-provoking master stroke. The introduction instantly focuses on the inhabitants rather than the buildings and their history. She gives us Miss Perfect, William Jealous and the Madders sisters, people we meet later, along with many other residents. 'Seeing a familiar street all those years ago made me wonder about the past overlapping with the present: how we may walk in someone else's footsteps, turn the same street corner, pass the same shop and cross the same road, and do all this a century apart.' So, half a century before Marc Bolan lived at 57 Blenheim Crescent, Emily Needham was a dressmaker there. Henry Armfield, a dyer and cleaner, is brought to life outside his shop by the magnification technique and assumes a stature that he can never do in the original picture. The captions, too, investigate the human side of Notting Hill, probing the people who ran the shops, lived in houses and worked in businesses. Even if you begin by not knowing Notting Hill, you're soon inside it, an inquisitive voyeur. Beats Albert Square any day." -- Picture Postcard Monthly, December 2007.

"Author's collecton of postcards brings history to life.. discover the hidden stories which lie on every corner of our streets."
-- Kensington and Chelsea News December 2007

"Every Road is Charmingly, Instantly, Identifiable"
"Hermione Cameron's book is a compendium of early 20th century postcards collected from hours spent trawling the market stalls, internet and archives. Laid out geographically, the photographs lead the reader from the original Notting Hill Gate tube station down to Lancaster Road via all the famous routes. Not heaving with historical facts on the area, it is more focused on the individual characters who lived and worked here a hundred years ago. We discover that the occupiers of 41 Pembridge Road offered the `best prices for old artificial teeth' and that a Mr Simon Green lived in the current Travel Bookshop. If you're lucky you might even discover who used to call your house their own. Apart from the lack of cars and much smaller trees every road is charmingly, instantly identifiable." The Hill DECEMBER 2007, p.54 -- The Hill, December 2007

"Every road is charmingly,instantly identifiable... Hermione Cameron's book is a compendium of early 20th century postcards collected from hours spent trawling the market stalls, internet and archives. Laid out geographically, the photographs lead the reader from the original Notting Hill Gate tube station down to Lancaster Road via all the famous routes. Not heaving with historical facts on the area, it is more focused on the individual characters who lived and worked here a hundred years ago. We discover that the occupiers of 41 Pembridge Road offered the `best prices for old artificial teeth' and that a Mr Simon Green lived in the current Travel Bookshop. If you're lucky you might even discover who used to call your house their own. Apart from the lack of cars and much smaller trees every road is charmingly, instantly identifiable." -- The Hill, December 2007

"If you want to know what Notting Hill was like all those years ago, this is a very good place to start. It's 'Notting Hill Behind the Scenes,' and it's been compiled and lovingly annotated by Hermione Cameron." -- Robert Elms on 'The Robert Elms Show' BBC RADIO LONDON, February 2008

"Meet Walter Carter, west London fishmonger, here photographed with his wife, four of his six children and several hundred bloaters, kippers and oysters - a collection that must have made this a particularly pongy part of Portobello Road market. The market sprang up in the 1870s from a horse-trading fair, and was a regular fruit-and-veg market until antiques stalls started appearing after World War II.

Carter is just one of Notting Hill's former residents and shopkeepers to appear in a new book of historic photographs of the area. We also liked the picture of a cramped corner shop that went by the name of Marks & Spencer. Whatever happened to them?" -- TIME OUT LONDON 2 January 2008

Cameron's book of photographs and postcards (the first in a Behind the Scenes series) surveys images of Notting Hill from a century ago; evidently, back then the area was populated by characters like the superbly monikered Mrs Memory and Miss Perfect, rather than celebrities and trustafarians.' -- Lucy Davies, Louise T Blouin Institute Talks

Review

"If you want to know what Notting Hill was like all those years ago, this is a very good place to start. It's 'Notting Hill Behind the Scenes,' and it's been compiled and lovingly annotated by Hermione Cameron."

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