Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £5.00
includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.
kindle unlimited logo
Unlimited reading. Over 1 million titles. Learn more
Read for £0.00
OR

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Nobody Of Any Importance: A Foot Soldier's Memoir Of World War I by [Sutcliffe, Sam]
Kindle App Ad

Nobody Of Any Importance: A Foot Soldier's Memoir Of World War I Kindle Edition

4.8 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£5.00

Length: 702 pages Word Wise: Enabled

40 Kindle Books for £1
Browse our selection of Kindle Books discounted to £1 each. Learn more
Get a £1 reward for movies or TV
Enjoy a £1.00 reward to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Video when you purchase any Amazon Kindle Book from the Kindle Store (excluding Kindle Unlimited, Periodicals and free Kindle Books) offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 reward per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at 23:59 on Wednesday, September 27, 2017. Terms and conditions apply


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1626 KB
  • Print Length: 702 pages
  • Publisher: Sutcliffe Publishing (17 July 2014)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00LXCI4JI
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #243,637 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
8
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 9 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have studied WW1 extensively, having asked the question "Why did my grandfather and his brother volunteer in 1914. Sadly, I was never able to ask the question directly. My grandfather survived the Somme injured but his brother did not survive Gallipoli.

This book has come closest to answering the question for me and is an excellent read giving more personal detail and background than a lot of memoirs.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book is a must for anyone who wants to understand the First World War and society at the time. Perhaps the most remarkable sentence in the book is the last: 'I was just 21'. The events that are accounted seem enough for several lifetimes. Sam Sutcliffe volunteered at 16 and lied about his age. He was enlisted and went through the usual trainings and transfers, through Malta and Egypt, before arriving at some of the worst places of the war. The names are enough to make one wonder how he came through it -- Gallipoli, the Somme, Arras -- not to mention prison camps set up by the retreating Germans. And it is because he is 'nobody of any importance' that the book has such power. This is not the account of one of those in command who could see (perhaps) what was going on, but a meticulous record of a simple squaddie who relies on his wits and his resourcefulness to get through whatever is thrown at him.
But perhaps he is not a 'simple squaddie'. His power of recall of the details of his life make the book continuously interesting. On subjects such as the importance of the Boy Scout movement in the years leading up to the war, the tricks one had to get up to even to feed in the prison camps, the behaviour of both officers and guards, many insights into the daily business of soldiering.
It's a pity his fastidiousness in not mentioning too many specific names slightly lessens its usefulness as historic record, but his son has supplied a fair number and more research might well tie the actions down exactly.
It's quite a long book, but it is never dull, and for an insight into the life of the British soldier din many theatres of war its information can be found nowhere else.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An absorbing, saddening but also an edifying read. I’d thought myself reasonably familiar with the horrors of WW1 from TV, books and other media, but this one really hit the button. Yes, Sam was just an ordinary boy of no importance as were all the others who served as ‘rankers’, but they were all individuals with thoughts and feelings, fears and hopes and in this account, we get to know the mind of just one of them. The absence of over-sensational descriptions is very effective; he just tells it how it was – and that was terrible enough. By the end I really felt I’d got to know this young man and appreciated his honesty, his principled nature. Also his sense of humour and sometimes cutting irony. Good editing too from his son, with very useful notes and explanations, not easily accessible on my elderly Kindle unfortunately; a paper edition would be very welcome!
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a very remarkable book. It provides a highly detailed first hand account of front line experience of action from the ranks rather than from an officer. Sam the foot soldier had extraordinary powers of observation, as well as uncannily good recall of what he observed even as a young child. These qualities contribute to a sense of immediacy and authenticity that make for powerful reading.

Firstly, Sam tells about his childhood which whilst materially deprived was rich in many other ways. He describes people, what they looked like, what they wore, how they moved and spoke in a way which I thought might prove tedious over the length of the book but rather was a constant delight. Buildings, interior and exterior, shops, streets, scenery and weather are all described in surprising detail. To say that he takes you into his world sounds like such a cliche, but sometimes it does feel more like watching a film than reading a book.

As his story proceeds we find that not only does Sam have surprisingly sharp senses and ability to report what he sees, hears, smells, but his perception of things less apparent is also unusual, especially in one so young. I am thinking here of the way he notices the behaviour of people and the more subtle nuances, drawing from this an understanding of inter, intra and group dynamics which adds a significant dimension to the book.

As other reviewers have noted, Sam tells it like it is. He tells us facts and is sparing with his opinions. He seeks to be even handed and his integrity and compassion are strongly present in his writing. Sam is honest about the extremes of the appalling suffering he endured, and yet the book is full of humour, wry comment and passages about times when he had some fun and life was good.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Sam Sutcliffe volunteered to serve as a soldier at the beginning of the first world war. This is an account of his experiences,starting with his early life, but the bulk of the book concerns his expexperiences in Gallipoli, then on the Western Front,then as a prisoner of war It is a fascinating historical autobiography, ably edited by his son.The book would make an interesting film or
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
click to open popover