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No Straight Lines Perfect Paperback – 3 Nov 2011

4.3 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Perfect Paperback: 252 pages
  • Publisher: Bloodstone Books (3 Nov. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0956766242
  • ISBN-13: 978-0956766243
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.4 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 461,096 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Alan Moore has designed and created everything from books to businesses. He has a unique grasp on the forces that are reshaping our world and how to creatively respond to them. Working on six continents, Alan has shared his knowledge in the form of board and advisory positions at companies such as Hewlett Packard, Microsoft and The Coca Cola Company, workshops and speaking as well as teaching in institutions as wide ranging as MIT and Reading University s Typography Department, Sloan School of Management and INSEAD. He is the author of four books on creativity, marketing and business transformation including 'No Straight Lines: making sense of our nonlinear world' (2011). He still works as an artist. He tries everyday to lead a life as beautifully as he possibly can.


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4.3 out of 5 stars
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Format: Perfect Paperback
Alan Moore explains today's political, social and economical upheaval and crisis by an industrial revolution got awry and overextended, resulting in the chaos that most us feel today. "No Straight Lines" explains how we allowed ourselves to get lost as human beings among autocratic agendas, economies-of-scale and hyper-capitalism and how that era is now coming to a painful end. It's a very refreshing big picture explanation to our jaded everyday complacency and the never ending doomsday prophesies from politicians to broadcast media. It made me realize that we live in the best of times with an incredible opportunity to design a new better and braver world if we only can muster the leap from linearity to connected dots.

The only way out of this dead-end is to rethink and redesign the way we live, work and play - from top to bottom. Alan Moore offer us his creative game plan for rediscovering humanity via natural human participation where craftsmanship, entrepreneurship and self-mastery will eventually replace hierarchies, lack of transparency and business as usual. Prepare to get your mind blown away - you will never look at the world in the same way again. I sure don't.
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The future of capitalism / economics / how we live is a fascinating topic. I'm hugely interested in people who take steps in this most difficult area - to start on a positive tone a great example is the Ellen MacArthur foundation.

According to the 'about the author section', Alan lectures at Judge and Said business schools, and is 'a great distiller of complex arguments into their most salient points'.

So this book promises a lot - a great topic and a seemingly great author. Yet what the book delivers is meaningless in the truest sense of the word.

I'm not saying the author is wrong. It's worse than that - I can't argue for or against the author as it's completely unclear what he is arguing. Even what topic he is on jumps all over the place, including lofty economic theorem and how the future of digital technology will affect us. And it's far less clear what it is he's proposing to better it with.

Where you want definition and clarity, you get long circular sentences. Where you want evidence, you get half-argued stories. It's not that the topic is big, or that the arguments are complex - if you can't make yourself clear it's because you do not know what you are saying.

Random examples are mentioned without supporting evidence or valid conclusion. Ones that spring to mind:
+ The connection between hospital management targets (presumably 'linear' thinking though it's never defined exactly what this means) and outbreaks of MRSA is potentially fascinating, but not backed up by any data or evidence, so why include?
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Format: Perfect Paperback
First - I should declare that Alan is a friend of mine and a inspiration to my thinking. He has been for many years now.
That said this is an honest opinion of the book given after a long period of reflection and some hard thought about context.
This book is not for the feint hearted. It is complex and challenging. Alan does not write in straight lines. His thinking and his writing take the twists and tumbles of the organic. For those of us brought up in the Western traditions of Aristotelian logic, of yes OR no, of causality, this can make for an uncomfortable journey.
But viewed through the lens of a search to describe something more holistic, closer to the Eastern traditions of yes AND no, of ying and yang, No Straight Lines can be viewed as a great exploration of a world that was always there, but which the web has enabled more of us to see.
In short, don't buy this book if you want a direct abc guide to building a business response to the disruptions of the self-forming groups of the web, buy it to help you understand the philosophical, humanistic drivers beyond the shift. Understand these and you can apply them to any abc situation for yourself.
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Format: Perfect Paperback
In No Straight Lines I felt like I had stepped into a gallery where Alan Moore intuitively and expertly juxtapose excerpts from literary works and papers in a compelling narrative that gives structure to this complex networked world that we live in and how we might improve it; specifically how we, as humans, can achieve more through co-creation by using open source software/ architecture and creative commons licenses. I’ve always believed in community and reciprocity so perhaps I have a natural bias towards his views. Much of his writing is inspiring, lots of food for thought and, giving it a musical bent, it felt like punk rock for the modern era - a challenge to the establishment. On a few occasions he raised ideas that I disagreed with but he explained them well and perhaps the friction was a consequence of my training in finance and economics - both might need rethinking. This is not a book for the feint hearted; you have to persevere with it and at times you do get a sense of circumlocution and you might question the relevance of specific examples however, once you’ve finished reading it you’ll find yourself looking at the digital world differently and in my case optimistically. It’s worth reading.
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