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No Man's Mistress (Mistress Trilogy) Mass Market Paperback – 2 Aug 2002

3.8 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group; Reprint edition (2 Aug. 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0440236576
  • ISBN-13: 978-0440236573
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 2.6 x 17.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,976,894 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"A lively and thrilling tale."
-"Rendezvous
"

"A lively and thrilling tale."--"Rendezvous
"

"A lively and thrilling tale." "Rendezvous
""

"A lively and thrilling tale."--Rendezvous

Book Description

Fall in love with NEW YORK TIMES bestselling author Mary Balogh's sparkling blend of romance, danger and intrigue as a dashing lord meets his match. . . --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
There are some really disturbing factors about this book that on the other hand is well-written and interesting, with sympathetic and coherent main characters as usual in Ms. Balogh's novels. I find I have to detach the novel from real life in general and from the historical background especially. On the other hand, is not escapism the whole idea with this genre of literature?

Contrary to some other reader critics of Amazon.Co.UK, I don't find it unbelievable that Ferdinand was a virgin at around thirty. (In fact, I found this detail to be endearing in him.) There is an explanation in the book for this phenomenon, even if one critic had not found it. I have known (even normal) men who have quite certainly been without sexual experience at thirty. Explanations vary; religion is one of them. They do exist (should I say more's the pity?).

It certainly worries me - but then, I am a doctor - that Viola has been working as a courtesan independent of any specific lover. She is even proud of the fact that she had been no man's mistress. She has had lots of customers in a circle with a high prevalence for syphilis (not to mention other venereal infections) in those days - even the famous Beau Brummell was a syphilis victim. Viola's customers must have had similar connections to numerous other women in her profession. It is not credible that she could have managed without catching something. I am totally sorry for having said this.

Another worrisome detail is the happy ending of this book. Of course it is right in our opinion that Ferdinand collects his male acquaintance and goes and beats the living daylights out of the man that had forced Viola to work as a prostitute, after which the ton accepts Viola into their midst. But then, this is supposed to be the 19th century.
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Format: Hardcover
I started reading this book because it's the natural following of one I liked so much, " More than a mistress " ( the male protagonist of " No man's mistress ", Frederick, is the younger brother of Jocelyn ) but honestly I consider the plot really unlikely - do you really believe to the existance of a man, even in the 19th century England, which is nearly thirty years old and having NO sexual experience ?!? beside that, MB is always a great writer so maybe this weakness in the initial hipothesis could be ( partially )forgiven ...
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Format: Kindle Edition
I read the reviews on Kindle and occasionally they put me off reading the books. Thankfully I did not allow the rather hit and miss reviews of this tale deter me and I have been rewarded with an unusual but delightful read.
There are a number of negative reviews of this book which frankly I find bizarre.
1. I remind myself that this is a novel- it is neither intended to be nor claims to be a serious history ,a social history or a medical treatise.
2. I am not therefore in the least bit troubled by the fact that poor Viola did not catch some terrible disease from her clients as the bottom line is not everyone who slept around caught STDs then or now .
3. There is nothing unusual about a man being sexually inexperienced though it's generally deemed more interesting for him to be a rake and the female a virgin in novels.
4. Not all courtesans remained outside society-look at Elizabeth Armistead who married Charles James Fox: was a celebrated courtesan who had numerous patrons from among the ton ,lived with Fox for many years as his mistress then married him and was generally accepted by society and indeed received a royal pension after his death.
So what's not to enjoy !
I thought this a lovely story-Viola taken advantage of by an unscrupulous man out of a sense of duty to her family,lovely Ferry having his faith in love restored by both his experience with Viola but also seeing the happy marriages of Jocelyn and Angie.
I loved it!
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I loved More than a Mistress and this is a follow up telling the story of of Ferdinand, the younger brother of the Duke of Tresham. It's quite nice to meet up with Tresham and Jane again, in fact those are the best bits of this book. I agree with the other reviewer - the likelihood of him having had NO sexual experience at all at his age and with his background - well.... For me Ms Balogh's attempt to turn the tables and match a male virgin with a female courtesan did not work at all. I also disliked the fact that she was forced into prostitution, her mother's complete ignorance of her lifestyle seemed odd to me and then as a grand finale the courtesan (who is pretty notorious amongst the gentlemen of the ton) is reinstated into society...... Um... I don't think so.
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Format: Paperback
Miss Viola Thornhill, a former courtesan, now resides in Pinewood Manor, a gift from her deceased father, the former Earl of Bamber. One day, a handsome stranger kisses her at the local fair, making her head spin. She doesn't think she will see him again, but the next day, he arrives at her house saying he's now the new owner and she must leave. The man is Lord Ferdinand Dudley, the younger 27 year old brother of the Duke of Tresham, one of the main protagnoists in the first book of the series. He has won the house through a card game, where the new Earl of Bamber offered it as his stake. Viola isn't happy, saying the property has always been hers, but Dudley doesn't agree. When neither agree to leave, both live together, but Viola hopes to make his life more difficult, so he will leave of his own accord. Over time, they begin to fall for each other and begin a relationship. Dudley wants to marry her, but Viola knows he cannot marry a bastard ex courtesan. Her own problems from her former life begin to creep up on her and despite already loving him, tries to turn Dudley away, so he realises she isn't a suitable bride. But Dudley is persistent, even offering for her to become his mistress and set her up in his brother's former mistress house. The Duke of Tresham is outraged his brother is having anything to do with Viola, for he knows of her reputation as Lilian Talbot, her alias when she was a courtesan. But Dudley loves Viola no matter what, and is determined to make Viola realise he loves her and marry him.

Overall, the book is good, but not as good as the first in the series. Couple of things that confused me:

SPOILERS

1) Ferdinand Dudley is a virgin when he meets Viola, and she only picks up on this when they first sleep together.
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