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No Labour, No Battle: Military Labour during the First World War (Military Historical Society) Paperback – 1 Dec 2014

4.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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  • No Labour, No Battle: Military Labour during the First World War (Military Historical Society)
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  • Dangerous Work: The Memoir of Private George Weeks of the Labour Corps 1917-1919
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Product details

  • Paperback: 420 pages
  • Publisher: The History Press (1 Dec. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0750956666
  • ISBN-13: 978-0750956666
  • Product Dimensions: 15.5 x 2.3 x 23.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 264,471 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

John Starling works at the Defence Academy, Shrivenham and is subject matter expert on small arms design. He had 30 years service in the Pioneer Cops/Royal Logistic Corps before retiring with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. Ivor Lee is a local government officer, having previously taught for over 30 years in secondary education.


Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
No Labour, No Battle is going to be a very useful reference source for the Labour Corps and, having been out of print for so long, I was very pleased to see that it has been re-printed by Spellmount as a paperback. My copy arrived yesterday and whilst I am delighted with the content - it has everything I expected to have, and more - I am singularly unimpressed by the production quality.

Spellmount are so proud of this book that they have categorized it in their Spellmount Great War Classics series. They are right do so because the research will probably not be bettered. And yet they've hardly applied classic production to the book itself which appears to come from the print-on-demand stable and has a cover so thin that my copy is already curling at the corners. I'd have also printed the book in a slightly larger format (something that Spellmount are well used to doing, glancing at some of their back catalogue on my bookshelves) and increased the point size. Maybe they should employ slightly older sub-editors with slightly failing eyesight; or maybe I should just get some glasses. Either way, I'd have willingly paid a few pounds more to have a more durable and accessible edition. What they've done is taken Rolls Royce Silver Shadow, painted it orange and put in plastic seats. It's a great shame because the content is first rate and frankly, I'd have expected more from Spellmount.

The content gets a five star rating from me, but the production gets one star. The authors should feel peeved.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I feel that there should have been greater distinction made in this book between Pioneer Battalions and Labour Corps. The former were volunteers trained as soldiers but with particular skills hence their additional payment of 2pence a day over an ordinary soldier. The Labour Corps were generally conscripts and not front line soldiers often because of their medical classification.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Fascinating book, well-researched and full of detail. Excellent service from bookseller.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x8cf18954) out of 5 stars 1 review
HASH(0x8cf181c8) out of 5 stars The Untold Story of British Labour Troops in the Great War 23 April 2016
By A. A. Nofi - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A summary of the review on StrategyPage.Com:

'the authors give us the first comprehensive account of a forgotten service, the British “Labour Corps,” troops and civilians who performed a remarkable variety of non-combat missions such as hewing timber, digging and filing in trenches, bringing in the harvest, working on transport and supply, performing security duty in rear areas, and more. The corps was recruited from men unfit for combat duty, whether by preexisting conditions or due to wounds. Although most of these men –ultimately numbering some 400,000 – were British or from the Dominions; there were also Indians, Fijians, West Indians, and many others from the colonies; and many “foreigners” such as Serbs, Russians, Chinese, Macedonians, and so forth; even German prisoners-of-war. While they were mostly away from the front, some of these men came under fire and even engaged in combat and took casualties. The authors give us a look at the politics of the Labour Corps (example: Was a colonial treasury or the British treasury responsible for pensions?), the recruitment, training, and organization of the many different types of Labour Corps units, service in various theatres, demobilization, and even how to search for someone’s service records. In looking at the army behind the army, the authors have made a valuable contribution to the literature of Britain in the Great War.'

For the full review, see StratgegyPage.Com
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