Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £13.49

Save £6.50 (33%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

No Future: Queer Theory and the Death Drive (Series Q) by [Edelman, Lee]
Kindle App Ad

No Future: Queer Theory and the Death Drive (Series Q) Kindle Edition

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
£13.49

Autumn Sale
Choose from over 400 books on sale from 99p. Shop now

Product description

Review

“"No Future" is a highly imaginative, terrifically suggestive, and altogether powerful book. The question at its political heart is an arresting one, not least because it appears so counterintuitive: Must every political vision be a vision of the future? This is the first study I know that submits the rhetoric of futurity itself to close scrutiny. An intellectually thrilling book.”—Diana Fuss, author of "The Sense of an Interior: Four Writers and the Rooms that Shaped Them"

“"No Future" is a nuanced polemic, both ringingly clear in its aesthetic and theoretical explications and simply thrilling to read. I learn so much from the way Lee Edelman grounds a queer ethics and politics outside kinship and reproductive circuits, those spaces of assimilation that use the bribe of futurity to distract us from the ongoing work of social violence and death.”—Lauren Berlant, author of "The Queen of America Goes to Washington City: Essays on Sex and Citizenship"

“In consistently brilliant theoretical discussions (for the most part, psychoanalytically inspired), as well as in strikingly original readings of Dickens, George Eliot, and Hitchcock, Lee Edelman argues that in a political culture dominated by the sentimental illusions and frequently murderous moral imperatives of ‘reproductive futurism,’ homosexuality has been assigned—and should deliberately and defiantly take on—the burden of a negativity at once embedded within and violently disavowed by that culture. The paradoxical dignity of queerness would be its refusal to believe in a redemptive future, its embrace of the unintelligibility, even the inhumanity inherent in sexuality. Edelman’s extraordinary text is so powerful that we could perhaps reproach him only for not spelling out the mode in which we might survive our necessary assent to his argument.”—Leo Bersani, author of "The Culture of Redemption," "Homos," and, with Ulysse Dutoit, "

""No Future" is a highly imaginative, terrifically suggestive, and altogether powerful book. The question at its political heart is an arresting one, not least because it appears so counterintuitive: Must every political vision be a vision of the future? This is the first study I know that submits the rhetoric of futurity itself to close scrutiny. An intellectually thrilling book."--Diana Fuss, author of "The Sense of an Interior: Four Writers and the Rooms that Shaped Them"

"Whether we decide to follow Edelman's example of rejecting the future or vehemently react against his polemic, " No Future" leaves no doubt that we cannot get around thinking critically about the uses and abuses of futurity." - Jana Funke, "thirdspace"

"No Future" is a nuanced polemic, both ringingly clear in its aesthetic and theoretical explications and simply thrilling to read. I learn so much from the way Lee Edelman grounds a queer ethics and politics outside kinship and reproductive circuits, those spaces of assimilation that use the bribe of futurity to distract us from the ongoing work of social violence and death. Lauren Berlant, author of "The Queen of America Goes to Washington City: Essays on Sex and Citizenship""

" No Future" is a highly imaginative, terrifically suggestive, and altogether powerful book. The question at its political heart is an arresting one, not least because it appears so counterintuitive: Must every political vision be a vision of the future? This is the first study I know that submits the rhetoric of futurity itself to close scrutiny. An intellectually thrilling book. Diana Fuss, author of "The Sense of an Interior: Four Writers and the Rooms that Shaped Them""

No Future is a nuanced polemic, both ringingly clear in its aesthetic and theoretical explications and simply thrilling to read. I learn so much from the way Lee Edelman grounds a queer ethics and politics outside kinship and reproductive circuits, those spaces of assimilation that use the bribe of futurity to distract us from the ongoing work of social violence and death. Lauren Berlant, author of The Queen of America Goes to Washington City: Essays on Sex and Citizenship"

In consistently brilliant theoretical discussions (for the most part, psychoanalytically inspired), as well as in strikingly original readings of Dickens, George Eliot, and Hitchcock, Lee Edelman argues that in a political culture dominated by the sentimental illusions and frequently murderous moral imperatives of reproductive futurism, homosexuality has been assigned and should deliberately and defiantly take on the burden of a negativity at once embedded within and violently disavowed by that culture. The paradoxical dignity of queerness would be its refusal to believe in a redemptive future, its embrace of the unintelligibility, even the inhumanity inherent in sexuality. Edelman s extraordinary text is so powerful that we could perhaps reproach him only for not spelling out the mode in which we might survive our necessary assent to his argument. Leo Bersani, author of The Culture of Redemption, Homos, and, with Ulysse Dutoit, Caravaggio s Secrets"

No Future is a highly imaginative, terrifically suggestive, and altogether powerful book. The question at its political heart is an arresting one, not least because it appears so counterintuitive: Must every political vision be a vision of the future? This is the first study I know that submits the rhetoric of futurity itself to close scrutiny. An intellectually thrilling book. Diana Fuss, author of The Sense of an Interior: Four Writers and the Rooms that Shaped Them"

Edelman has certainly articulated a new direction for queer theory, making No Future required reading both within the field and beyond. --Andrea Fontenot "Modern Fiction Studies ""

The book represents a rigorous attempt to think at once generatively and against tropes of generation, to work at once in irony and in earnest to demonstrate the political s material dependence on Symbolic homo-logy. Whether we decide to follow Edelman s example of rejecting the future or vehemently react against his polemic, No Future leaves no doubt that we cannot get around thinking critically about the uses and abuses of futurity. The book represents a rigorous attempt to think at once generatively and against tropes of generation, to work at once in irony and in earnest to demonstrate the political s material dependence on Symbolic homo-logy. --Jana Funke "thirdspace ""

"No Future is a nuanced polemic, both ringingly clear in its aesthetic and theoretical explications and simply thrilling to read. I learn so much from the way Lee Edelman grounds a queer ethics and politics outside kinship and reproductive circuits, those spaces of assimilation that use the bribe of futurity to distract us from the ongoing work of social violence and death."--Lauren Berlant, author of The Queen of America Goes to Washington City: Essays on Sex and Citizenship

"In consistently brilliant theoretical discussions (for the most part, psychoanalytically inspired), as well as in strikingly original readings of Dickens, George Eliot, and Hitchcock, Lee Edelman argues that in a political culture dominated by the sentimental illusions and frequently murderous moral imperatives of 'reproductive futurism, ' homosexuality has been assigned--and should deliberately and defiantly take on--the burden of a negativity at once embedded within and violently disavowed by that culture. The paradoxical dignity of queerness would be its refusal to believe in a redemptive future, its embrace of the unintelligibility, even the inhumanity inherent in sexuality. Edelman's extraordinary text is so powerful that we could perhaps reproach him only for not spelling out the mode in which we might survive our necessary assent to his argument."--Leo Bersani, author of The Culture of Redemption, Homos, and, with Ulysse Dutoit, Caravaggio's Secrets

"No Future is a highly imaginative, terrifically suggestive, and altogether powerful book. The question at its political heart is an arresting one, not least because it appears so counterintuitive: Must every political vision be a vision of the future? This is the first study I know that submits the rhetoric of futurity itself to close scrutiny. An intellectually thrilling book."--Diana Fuss, author of The Sense of an Interior: Four Writers and the Rooms that Shaped Them

"Edelman has certainly articulated a new direction for queer theory, making No Future required reading both within the field and beyond."--Andrea Fontenot "Modern Fiction Studies "

"The book represents a rigorous attempt to think at once generatively and against tropes of generation, to work at once in irony and in earnest to demonstrate the political's material dependence on Symbolic homo-logy."Whether we decide to follow Edelman's example of rejecting the future or vehemently react against his polemic, No Future leaves no doubt that we cannot get around thinking critically about the uses and abuses of futurity."The book represents a rigorous attempt to think at once generatively and against tropes of generation, to work at once in irony and in earnest to demonstrate the political's material dependence on Symbolic homo-logy."--Jana Funke "thirdspace "

"One of the great virtues of Edelman's thesis is that it restores the distinction between queerness and homosexuality per se. Edelman goes some way to returning the uncanniness attached to queerness which has been dispelled by the very signifier 'gay' and the cosy, Kylie-loving, unthreatening cheeriness with which it has become associated."--K-Punk

"This is a book, I confess, that I would love to have written. Angry, eloquent, precise, beautifully composed, funny, over the top, and very smart, the four chapters . . . articulate a controversial and disturbingly persuasive figural and rhetorical diagnostic of a moment in U.S. political life."--Carla Freccero "GLQ "

Review

“The book represents a rigorous attempt to think at once generatively and against tropes of generation, to work at once in irony and in earnest to demonstrate the political’s material dependence on Symbolic homo-logy.”Whether we decide to follow Edelman’s example of rejecting the future or vehemently react against his polemic, No Future leaves no doubt that we cannot get around thinking critically about the uses and abuses of futurity.“The book represents a rigorous attempt to think at once generatively and against tropes of generation, to work at once in irony and in earnest to demonstrate the political’s material dependence on Symbolic homo-logy.” - Jana Funke, thirdspace


"One of the great virtues of Edelman's thesis is that it restores the distinction between queerness and homosexuality per se. Edelman goes some way to returning the uncanniness attached to queerness which has been dispelled by the very signifier 'gay' and the cosy, Kylie-loving, unthreatening cheeriness with which it has become associated." - K-Punk


"This is a book, I confess, that I would love to have written. Angry, eloquent, precise, beautifully composed, funny, over the top, and very smart, the four chapters . . . articulate a controversial and disturbingly persuasive figural and rhetorical diagnostic of a moment in U.S. political life." - Carla Freccero, GLQ


“Edelman has certainly articulated a new direction for queer theory, making No Future required reading both within the field and beyond.” - Andrea Fontenot, Modern Fiction Studies


“The book represents a rigorous attempt to think at once generatively and against tropes of generation, to work at once in irony and in earnest to demonstrate the political’s material dependence on Symbolic homo-logy.” - Carolyn Denver, Victorian Studies


No Future is a nuanced polemic, both ringingly clear in its aesthetic and theoretical explications and simply thrilling to read. I learn so much from the way Lee Edelman grounds a queer ethics and politics outside kinship and reproductive circuits, those spaces of assimilation that use the bribe of futurity to distract us from the ongoing work of social violence and death.”—Lauren Berlant, author of The Queen of America Goes to Washington City: Essays on Sex and Citizenship


“In consistently brilliant theoretical discussions (for the most part, psychoanalytically inspired), as well as in strikingly original readings of Dickens, George Eliot, and Hitchcock, Lee Edelman argues that in a political culture dominated by the sentimental illusions and frequently murderous moral imperatives of ‘reproductive futurism,’ homosexuality has been assigned—and should deliberately and defiantly take on—the burden of a negativity at once embedded within and violently disavowed by that culture. The paradoxical dignity of queerness would be its refusal to believe in a redemptive future, its embrace of the unintelligibility, even the inhumanity inherent in sexuality. Edelman’s extraordinary text is so powerful that we could perhaps reproach him only for not spelling out the mode in which we might survive our necessary assent to his argument.”—Leo Bersani, author of The Culture of Redemption, Homos, and, with Ulysse Dutoit, Caravaggio’s Secrets


“No Future is a highly imaginative, terrifically suggestive, and altogether powerful book. The question at its political heart is an arresting one, not least because it appears so counterintuitive: Must every political vision be a vision of the future? This is the first study I know that submits the rhetoric of futurity itself to close scrutiny. An intellectually thrilling book.”—Diana Fuss, author of The Sense of an Interior: Four Writers and the Rooms that Shaped Them


“Edelman has certainly articulated a new direction for queer theory, making No Future required reading both within the field and beyond.”
(Andrea Fontenot Modern Fiction Studies)

“The book represents a rigorous attempt to think at once generatively and against tropes of generation, to work at once in irony and in earnest to demonstrate the political’s material dependence on Symbolic homo-logy.”
(Carolyn Denver Victorian Studies)

“The book represents a rigorous attempt to think at once generatively and against tropes of generation, to work at once in irony and in earnest to demonstrate the political’s material dependence on Symbolic homo-logy.”Whether we decide to follow Edelman’s example of rejecting the future or vehemently react against his polemic, No Future leaves no doubt that we cannot get around thinking critically about the uses and abuses of futurity.“The book represents a rigorous attempt to think at once generatively and against tropes of generation, to work at once in irony and in earnest to demonstrate the political’s material dependence on Symbolic homo-logy.”
(Jana Funke thirdspace)

"One of the great virtues of Edelman's thesis is that it restores the distinction between queerness and homosexuality per se. Edelman goes some way to returning the uncanniness attached to queerness which has been dispelled by the very signifier 'gay' and the cosy, Kylie-loving, unthreatening cheeriness with which it has become associated."
(K-Punk)

"This is a book, I confess, that I would love to have written. Angry, eloquent, precise, beautifully composed, funny, over the top, and very smart, the four chapters . . . articulate a controversial and disturbingly persuasive figural and rhetorical diagnostic of a moment in U.S. political life."
(Carla Freccero GLQ)

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 6404 KB
  • Print Length: 206 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0822333694
  • Publisher: Duke University Press Books (15 Nov. 2004)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00EHBSNK2
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #409,295 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  • Would you like to tell us about a lower price?


Customer reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers
See all 2 customer reviews

Top customer reviews

on 6 December 2010
Format: Paperback
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 2 June 2008
Format: Paperback
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Most helpful customer reviews on Amazon.com

Amazon.com: 3.1 out of 5 stars 5 reviews
One person found this helpful.
4.0 out of 5 starsI definitely recommend this book.
on 7 November 2013 - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
45 people found this helpful.
4.0 out of 5 starsdoes politics need futurity?
on 16 November 2007 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback|Verified Purchase
5 people found this helpful.
2.0 out of 5 stars"The paradoxical dignity of queerness would be...its embrace of the unintelligibility [& inhumanity]...inherent in sexuality."
on 9 August 2015 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
5.0 out of 5 starsFive Stars
on 17 June 2016 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
11 people found this helpful.
1.0 out of 5 starsAll Style No Substance
on 7 February 2014 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback|Verified Purchase
click to open popover

Where's My Stuff?

Delivery and Returns

Need Help?