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The Night Watch by [Waters, Sarah]
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The Night Watch Kindle Edition

3.8 out of 5 stars 206 customer reviews

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Length: 509 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Product Description

Review

"Flawless...A sophisticated beautifully written novel."
--"The Washington Post"
"Captivating."
--"The New York Times "
"Masterful."
--"The Seattle Times "
"[A] wonderful novel...Waters is almost Dickensian in her wealth of description and depth of character."
--"Chicago Tribune"
"Waters has the gift of story, the ability to dissolve the distance between reader and subject until nothing but experience remains."
--"Los Angeles Times"
"Compelling...sexually and psychologically provocative."
--"USA Today "

Flawless A sophisticated beautifully written novel.
"The Washington Post"
Captivating.
"The New York Times "
Masterful.
"The Seattle Times "
[A] wonderful novel Waters is almost Dickensian in her wealth of description and depth of character.
"Chicago Tribune"
Waters has the gift of story, the ability to dissolve the distance between reader and subject until nothing but experience remains.
"Los Angeles Times"
Compelling sexually and psychologically provocative.
"USA Today ""

Suzi Feay, Independent on Sunday

'Brilliantly done... a tour-de-force of hints, clues and dropped threads'

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1118 KB
  • Print Length: 509 pages
  • Publisher: Virago (3 Feb. 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004JHY6GO
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars 206 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #8,318 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Keris Nine TOP 500 REVIEWER on 6 Jan. 2006
Format: Hardcover
The cover of the proof copy of Sarah Waters new novel comes adorned with might well be the subtitle of the book – “A Lot Of People Who Lived Through the War Don’t Like to Talk About It”, but it’s not just the war that is discreetly pushed aside by each of the characters, it is their unwillingness to face up to who they are, to the secret lives they were forced to lead and the terrible actions that each of them were driven to during a very turbulent time in their lives.
Opening in 1947 after the war, each of the characters has a dark secret they wish to block out. Helen and Viv work together in a London dating agency on Oxford Street. Helen is in love with Julia, a writer of mystery fiction, but the necessity of keeping her love secret and her own jealousy is tearing their relationship apart. Viv is having an affair with a married man, Reggie – a relationship that is doomed as he is never going to leave his wife. Viv’s brother Duncan was imprisoned during the war years over an incident that is of great distress to his father and sister. A sensitive boy, he lives now with his ‘Uncle Horace’ who he knows from prison. When by chance he meets Fraser, who he also knew from prison, the claustrophobic, locked-away existence becomes too much for him to bear, but Fraser also opens Viv’s eyes to how restricted her own life with a married man is. Connecting many of these characters is Kay, a mysterious boyish-looking girl, who seems to have endured the hardships of the war better than most, but to a cost. The toll of the war years on the characters is covered in the remaining two sections of ‘The Night Watch’ as it then moves backwards in time to 1944 and 1941.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
There are a few things about Sarah Waters' books, the fact you can't put her books down, and read them at the speed of light and also that she REALLY knows about the era she's writing about. All that same quality is in this novel.
The story follows the intriguing stories of four main characters; Kay, Viv, Helen and Duncan. The characterisation is fantastic and you don't have to read too much before you really get a sense of the type of person each character is and become totally absorbed in following the characters.
It's a very clever novel, starting in 1947, then going back to 1944 and ending in 1941, so as the blurb suggests, you end with the beginning. Like a previous reviewer I felt the last section wasn't really needed as it didn't further what you needed to know about the characters and for me personally I'd have prefered to have gone back to 1947 by that point as it felt like some of the storylines were left with loose ends.
The setting of war-torn London is brilliantly presented and described to the reader, and the sections on Kay and her work in the ambulance service are very gritty, realistic and historically accurate; going to bomb sites to deal with the injured and dead and how that affected her personality.
It's also excellent writing setting the scene and situations faced by the ordinary women working in London in the 1940s, and the things faced every day by people trying to go about their own business.
Throughout the book there is a wonderful suspense and tension and little things revealed all along, with some wonderful twists and plot links. A really good book should always leave the reader wanting more, but after reading this book not only did I want more, but it felt more like it was unfinished and I felt several things were left unresolved, unless of course that is the author's intention.
This is still a superb read though, and highly recommended.
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Format: Hardcover
I loved this book. I should declare a fondness for involved historical dramas with human interest, so perhaps The Night Watch had a starting advantage.

The novel, set in 1940s London, followed various young people through the war and the immediate aftermath: Kay, Julia and Helen - three gay women; Reggie and Viv - a soldier and his mistress; and Duncan - Viv's mixed up brother. The characters are rich, and the secondary characters are no less vivid. The novel has space - six years, nearly five hundred pages, and a widely drawn cast which allows for a lot of plot development and intrigue.

The detailing is superb, with scenes described to perfection. This is never overbearing, but the beauty is in the clarity. And there is humanity and humour amongst it all. It is interesting to contrast the impact of the occasional terrorist incident today and the nightly bombing, killing and devastation that people endured only 60 years ago. And it was especially interesting to reflect on the helplessness that prisoners must have felt, unable to seek safety or shelter as bombs dropped around them.

Sarah Waters uses perfect judgement, too, in addressing homosexuality in 1940s Britain in such a subtle and caring way. She focuses on the people and the love, rather than the sex and the scandal. This is a rare feat that her male counterparts could learn from.

The novel is narrated in three chunks, in reverse chronological sequence. This gives it an odd feel, and I am sure we will all have preferences about which chunk we felt most engaged with and how we might have ordered it. Personally, I preferred the middle: the 1944 chunk. Its ending, as ambulancewoman Kay discovers the fate of her lover Helen, is my personal emotional crescendo.
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