FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
The New High-Intensity Tr... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships from USA. Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for delivery. Light shelf wear and minimal interior marks. A tradition of quality and service.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

The New High-Intensity Training Paperback – 27 May 2005

3.4 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£12.99
£5.69 £0.80
£12.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • The New High-Intensity Training
  • +
  • High-Intensity Training the Mike Mentzer Way
Total price: £27.17
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Rodale Press (27 May 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594860009
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594860003
  • Product Dimensions: 21.3 x 1.3 x 27.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 43,180 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Ellington Darden, Ph.D., is the leading disciple of the HIT training methods of Arthur Jones, the inventor of Nautilus exercise equipment. Darden, for 17 years the director of research for Nautilus Sports/Medical Industries, is the author of such enormously popular books on high-intensity workouts as "The Nautilus Book, High-Intensity Bodybuilding, "and "100 High-Intensity Ways to Build Your Body," along with 40 other fitness books. He currently resides in Windermere, Florida.


Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
As an adept of the HIT training system, I found this book very disappointing. The author does not emphasize the theories/advantages/disadvantages of HIT as much as focusing on a one-sided odyssey of the man who commercialised the Nautilus training equipment, Arthur Jones.

Almost half of the book is dedicated exclusively to exaggerated praises to Jones (the author makes an effort to present him as a revolutionary man and an adventurer with a wonderful sense of humour, but my personal impression was - disappointingly - of an mean, irrational, eccentric, vain, arrogant, stubborn, crude and rude bully). To further emphasize Arthur Jones' "superiority", the author criticises at great length a number of successful bodybuilders (including - surprisingly - HIT "godfather" Mike Mentzer) presenting unflattering stories of a purely personal nature which I personally found very hard to believe.

The other part of the book is dedicated to training. I found it average in terms of information and quite brief, consisting mainly of common sense advice and a few generic "health routines". The author fails (in my opinion) to justify his choices or to present scientific evidence to back up his claims (other than some unverifiable measurements of Casey Viator against a number of non-HIT bodybuilders).

Overall, I found the book to be the personal vendetta - paparazzi style - of a bitter, unsuccessful bodybuilder, whose only means to gain attention is to present unflattering, moot personal stories about everybody else.

Just my 2 cents' worth...
Comment 62 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I gave this book a '1 star' rating so that I can write a review.
A '0 star' rating is appropriate. The beginning of this frightening book is quite interesting. There is information about the travels of Arthur Jones, creator of Nautilus and credited by many people as the person that discovered the benefits of high-intensity, infrequent resistance training.
Why do I dislike this book? Near page 30 the book becomes a horrible read. Darden seems supportive of Jones' violence. Darden seems like a giggling child describing the 'fun' he had with Jones. He hints that Jones would fight with bodybuilders. Jones would give orders, terrorise, threaten, degrade and humiliate
people. There is an account of Jones challenging somebody to a fistfight at a University lecture. Jones discovered that this person refused to fight in the Vietnam war ('hid out' as Darden describes it). Jones described to the audience how he planned to give him an 'ass-kicking' and tear him apart (literally).
Darden writes about 'sissies' and a violent powerlifter.
Arthur Jones, if these accounts are true, is a mentally ill, psychopathic (perhaps) bully.
My book will be put in a bin.
I recommend 'Muscles in Minutes' and 'Heavy Duty 2 Mind & Body' to people intersted by one set to failure training.
Visit the mike mentzer website to find these.
Comment 56 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book as I use the HIT method as a part of my training and thought this book might have some insight or tips to help me further my training goals. However the book turned out to be quite disappointing, it had no real insights except to say "use this system because a veritable god "created" it"... This book is guilty of doing what the authors says other systems do, namely proclaiming that this is the best system but others are rubbish. It misses the point by a wide margin, using what works in the key, instead of an instruction manual explaining how to use the HIT system this book is mainly composed of anecdotes and proclamations about how wonderful this system is. Oh and it has a few exercises thrown in too. Best spend your money on a more complete book if you are seeking instruction in weightlifting and bodybuilding.
Comment 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book is divided into 6 parts. Parts 1 to 4 is written is a logical way. Part 5 of the book totally goes against what has been written in part 3 and 4. The other negative thing with this book is that the author recommends super slow reps, 30 sec positive and 30 sec negative. I feel performing such reps in super slow style is like faking it unless the resistance is so high that it actually takes someone in total 60 seconds to perform a rep but then in that case, they would never be able to perform 8 reps which would take them around 8 minutes. Why would someone use this technique when you can do forced reps and negative reps?

However the reason, I give it 2 stars is because of the entertaining stories presented in parts 1 and 2 of the book. For HIT, the best book to buy is the one by Mike Mentzer or Dorian Yates. I have both those books and would recommend them over this one.

And finally HIT is not suited for beginners or those new to gym or even for those wanting to lose fat.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Massive disappointment. How it can say it's a "new" high intensity book living off teachings from old bodybuilders?? The results (in form of pictures) aren't exactly to look at what the book claims "the best muscle building system". And the workouts aren't exactly a daily write up of a programme. Mike mentzers programme is basically the most direct 1 I've came across.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
As somone who loves to lift, I got this book with an open mind and looked forward to learning something new. Unfortunately it failed to deliver anything but a bitter snipe at the rest of the bodybuilding community. It seems that Arthur Jones had a deep seated hate of Joe Weider, so he chose to try and smear his greatest asset, Arnold, widely considered to be one (if not the greatest body build of the Golden Era)For the most part its an ego trip for the late Jones. He claims he pulled Arnold and from a car by his collar and threatend to kick his ass... Arthur was half his size and twice his age.

Few facts back up his ideas except an array of, I suspect largely ficticous, anecdotal reports. If this amazing training systme worked so well, I find it strange that so few have taken it up, as it claims to require shorter and less frequent workouts.

The Diet section is almost comical.

With out being, rude, it verges on twoddle...
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback