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The New Gambler's Bible: How to Beat the Casinos, the Tracks, Your Bookie, and Your Buddies Paperback – 1 Feb 1997

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 385 pages
  • Publisher: Three Rivers Press; 1 edition (1 Feb. 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0517886693
  • ISBN-13: 978-0517886694
  • Product Dimensions: 23.4 x 15.6 x 2.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,469,653 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

From the Author

Thoughts on games, gambling, and life
I put this book together mainly because I was annoyed with the existing works on gmabling. For the most part they were either flat-out wrong (e.g., all those books telling you how you can win at craps--you can't) or they are so specialized that they only give decent advice about one or two games.

I also wanted to have some fun. In my real life I'm a professor of psychology and virtually all of my writing is esoteric, highly specialized and deals with arcane areas in cognitive psychology and the philosophy of mind. Ah, but give me the choice between addressing a group of academics or sitting down in a $20/40 Hold 'em game and I choose poker!

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Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on 29 Jan. 2004
Format: Paperback
Tells you what games you can have an edge on, and how (Horse racing, Poker, Blackjack), and tells why the rest are a waste of time, in detail. An excellent guide for the student of gambling. Explains the laws of probability, and exposes gambling myths.
And it's a good read.
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Format: Paperback
This is a gambling book that looks at gambling in a realistic fashion. The first thing it does is to divide the games into those you can win in the long run (Blackjack (Barely), Poker, Sports Betting, etc) and those that you must lose in the long run (roulette, craps, baccarat, etc). It then explains each game in detail. It explains why progression betting systems don't work long-term, and why money management is psychological, not mathematical. For all the simple games (baccarat, roulette, etc) it provides all you'll ever need to know. For more complicated games like poker and blackjack, it provides all that most people will ever need to know and a firm basis for the serious student.
In the world of BS gambling books, this is a breath of fresh air.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x8eff39e4) out of 5 stars 2 reviews
24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8f2bf390) out of 5 stars Solid book, good advice, based on math - truly fantastic 13 Nov. 1998
By John Baker - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is a gambling book that looks at gambling in a realistic fashion. The first thing it does is to divide the games into those you can win in the long run (Blackjack (Barely), Poker, Sports Betting, etc) and those that you must lose in the long run (roulette, craps, baccarat, etc). It then explains each game in detail. It explains why progression betting systems don't work long-term, and why money management is psychological, not mathematical. For all the simple games (baccarat, roulette, etc) it provides all you'll ever need to know. For more complicated games like poker and blackjack, it provides all that most people will ever need to know and a firm basis for the serious student.
In the world of BS gambling books, this is a breath of fresh air.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
HASH(0x8f10c9cc) out of 5 stars Pay attention, would-be gamblers 13 Aug. 2012
By Grady Historian - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this book as one of the teeming millions who gambles regularly with only a superficial understanding of the underlying structures. While I think I'm relatively intelligent, play blackjack according to the standard model, and delight in websites like the Wizard Of Odds, this book pointed out gaping holes in my understanding.

Over the years, various friends have told me stupid things like "craps offers the best odds of any table game," "blackjack is a sucker's game," and "I'm really good at roulette." Reber's book explodes those myths with sound mathematical basis and a patient pedagogy. His background as a psychology professor might come as a surprise, but might also provide the book's greatest benefit - as academic, educational, and mental processes clearly take center stage.

Reber divides games into ones that you are bound to lose at over time (craps, roulette, baccarat) and ones that you could actually stand a chance to win (e.g., blackjack, poker, horse racing). While he goes into some depth of explanation in defense of his breakdown, I like his more simple heuristic suggests that if no one is doing that work for a living, it's probably a sucker's bet. That's why you do have professional horse betters and professional poker players, but not professional craps shooters.

For the sake of full disclosure, Reber is my uncle by marriage, so I had a good reason to read the book. Still, I would recommend it for others. When I told Unc that I had won a series of friendly poker games, his response was typically laconic: "As for winning at poker three sessions in a row --- check your nearest random number table before drawing any conclusions." In other words, don't think you've got some deep insight just by a few winning sessions.

This book will make those wins more fundamentally sound and hopefully more frequent.
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