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Never Snows in September: The German View of Market-Garden and the Battle of Arnhem, September 1944 Hardcover – 1 Jan 1997

4.6 out of 5 stars 69 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 364 pages
  • Publisher: Sarpedon; Reprint edition (1 Jan. 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1885119313
  • ISBN-13: 978-1885119315
  • Product Dimensions: 24.3 x 18.2 x 3.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (69 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 732,085 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Synopsis

The German View of Market Garden and the Battle of Arnhem. The airborne landing at Arnhem was immortalizing in the film A Bridge to Far, but this is the first account making extensive use of German sources.


Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
What this guy doesn't know about Operation Market Garden probably isn't worth knowing.
Having read a few accounts from the Allied perspective, this book's interpretation of events from the point of view of the Germans was fascinating. Kershaw's position is, essentially, that there has been too much focus upon the failure of the operation as a result of Allied mistakes; he examines the extraordinarily effective response the Germans managed to put together - still reeling from their defeat at Normandy, cobbling together troops who were often too young/inexperienced to have undergone any combat. An appreciation of the bravery of the Arnhem landings - and their ultimately tragic conclusion - is certainly not diminished by this re-focus; indeed, I came away with even more admiration as Kershaw makes it clear that the Allied troops faced a far more formidable enemy than might have been expected - and that the airborne troops actually did all that was asked of them. I thoroughly recommend it if you have more than a passing interest in the Arnhem landings.
The author has been let down by the publisher, though. They've been publishing this, in a number of editions, for many years - so a decent copy editor should have spotted the typo's (and, frankly, some clunky grammar at times). Far worse is the transformation to the current paperback edition. Throughout the text, there are references to specific photographs which aren't supplied and you get the sense of missing maps. Eventually, frustrated, I bought a secondhand copy of the out of print illustrated version: virtually every page has photographs or explanatory diagrams/maps - and suddenly everything makes sense. It's like finding out there's a video of something you thought only existed as a radio programme.
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Format: Hardcover
Kershaws book is phenomenally enlightening from the Axis perspective of operation Market Garden. This is pure military history entwined with personal accounts of German soldiers who fought either the British, Polish or American airborne troops in the three 'theatres' of the airborne landings or XXX Corps advance through the corridor.
Whilst most contemporary western accounts depicte Market Garden as an heroic and desperate battle by airborne troops overwhelmed by superior German armoured forces, Kershaw has taken great pains to project the alternative view in terms of the rapid organisation and improvisation of ad-hoc German forces that were committed to the various combat areas in order to stem the tide.
Kershaws book effectively conveys the suffering and loss of a variety of German military personal who were unexpectively thrown into a major battle that they had neither expected nor were initially prepared to deal with.
For any student truly interested in "the full picture" of Market Garden, not only from the generally accepted allied synopsis of the battle but also from the lessor known Axis perspective (especially in terms of the rapid ad-hoc improvisation and organisation that the German command structure implemented to deal with this major threat to the Rhine) this is a book that will certainly not disappoint.
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Format: Hardcover
This is probably the best account of the German side of Operation Market Garden in English. The author, a British Parachute regiment officer, used German sources while he was based in Germany to find out what happened from the other side of the hill. It is a fascinating account and dispels some of the myths about the battle, especially the controversy over whether there were really two full panzer divisions in the area when the Operation took place. He uses German ration returns and maintenance reports to show what was there for definite and uses his military knowledge to fill in the few gaps with reasonable guesses. In all he paints a different picture to the popular histories.
If you are seriously interested in Market Garden then you must buy this book, it is an invaluable resource.
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Format: Paperback
Having read many books on Arnhem,being a reader,collector & buff on World
War2, I can say without any hesitation that "It never snows in September"
is, without any doubt the best written and above all the most honest and
truthful account of this epic battle during World War2. I strongly recomend all interested parties to read this book, even if you are already
in the middle of another version of "Market Garden, put it down and buy
"It never snows in September". You will not regret it. The only regret that I have, is that I never bought the Hard cover. Sid Scarsbrook.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a great idea: an analysis from the German perspective of how they responded to and contained the Allied airborne assault in Holland.

Previous accounts have tended to dwell on the Allied experience, with the Germans usually somewhat anonymous. Kershaw's account sets out how very adept the Germans were at improvising a defence, using literally the scrapings of the rear echelon: old men, convalescent wounded, conscripted police, naval "battalions" comprised of the crews of lost or blockaded ships, and so on, with just a stiffening of SS veterans. Odd tanks, trucks and half tracks were cobbled, together with whatever infantry could be found, into ad hoc forces that were pitted against elite paratroopers, and won.

Essentially the German strategy was to delay the advance of the relief force while simply containing the various paradrops, their idea being that if the relief column could be halted the airborne forces would inevitably have to capitulate.

Quite a lot of German WW2 tactical practice made it into post-war NATO doctrine, something on which Kershaw - as a former parachute officer himself - speaks with great authority. The German (and NATO) response to the dropping of paratroopers behind the main line was to counterattack them immediately with any troops to hand whatever, regardless of losses, in order to prevent their cohesion and to separate them from their existing and expected supplies. This worked perfectly at Arnhem, where an elite paratroop division was defeated by probably the worst troops Germany had yet fielded. There were crack SS troops there too, but the advance to the bridge was halted by poor quality rear echelon forces who dug in tenaciously and would not be dislodged.
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