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Never Let Me Go by [Ishiguro, Kazuo]
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Never Let Me Go Kindle Edition

3.8 out of 5 stars 786 customer reviews

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Length: 275 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

" A page turner and a heartbreaker, a tour de force of knotted tension and buried anguish." -- "Time"
" A Gothic tour de force. . . . A tight, deftly controlled story . . . . Just as accomplished [as "The Remains of the Day"] and, in a very different way, just as melancholy and alarming." -- "The New York Times"
" Elegaic, deceptively lovely. . . . As always, Ishiguro pulls you under." -- "Newsweek"
" Superbly unsettling, impeccably controlled . . . . The book' s irresistible power comes from Ishiguro' s matchless ability to expose its dark heart in careful increments." -- "Entertainment Weekly"

"A page turner and a heartbreaker, a tour de force of knotted tension and buried anguish."--"Time"
"A Gothic tour de force. . . . A tight, deftly controlled story . . . . Just as accomplished [as "The Remains of the Day"] and, in a very different way, just as melancholy and alarming."--"The New York Times"
"Elegaic, deceptively lovely. . . . As always, Ishiguro pulls you under." --"Newsweek"
"Superbly unsettling, impeccably controlled . . . . The book's irresistible power comes from Ishiguro's matchless ability to expose its dark heart in careful increments." --"Entertainment Weekly"

"A page turner and a heartbreaker, a tour de force of knotted tension and buried anguish. "Time"

A Gothic tour de force. . . . A tight, deftly controlled story . . . . Just as accomplished [as The Remains of the Day] and, in a very different way, just as melancholy and alarming. "The New York Times"

"Elegaic, deceptively lovely. . . . As always, Ishiguro pulls you under." "Newsweek"

Superbly unsettling, impeccably controlled . . . . The book s irresistible power comes from Ishiguro s matchless ability to expose its dark heart in careful increments. "Entertainment Weekly""

"A page turner and a heartbreaker, a tour de force of knotted tension and buried anguish. Time

A Gothic tour de force. . . . A tight, deftly controlled story . . . . Just as accomplished [as The Remains of the Day] and, in a very different way, just as melancholy and alarming. The New York Times

"Elegaic, deceptively lovely. . . . As always, Ishiguro pulls you under." Newsweek

Superbly unsettling, impeccably controlled . . . . The book s irresistible power comes from Ishiguro s matchless ability to expose its dark heart in careful increments. Entertainment Weekly

"

Review

"'Ishiguro is the best and most original novelist of his generation.' Susan Hill, Mail on Sunday"

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 715 KB
  • Print Length: 275 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Open Market - Airside ed edition (8 Jan. 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002RI9ZX6
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars 786 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #5,135 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Never Let Me Go is in some ways more straightforward than most of Kazuo Ishiguro's novels, and more fully comprehensible than any since his masterpiece The Remains of the Day. And yet there is still enough lightness of detail and wealth of moral ambiguity to justify much strokey-chin thought after the last page has been closed, and even to warrant an early re-read.
The setting of the book is "England, late 1990s," but not as we know it. We can tell this even from the limited narrative offered by Kathy, who tells us very little of the real world outside her immediate (and past) environs. There are words dropped innocently but sinisterly: donations, carers, completing, none of which have the meanings we understand. Kathy was a student at Hailsham, a residential institution for children which educated them and encouraged creative expression, but was not quite a school... They are being prepared for lives as 'carers' and 'donors', and they are a form of experiment made possible by advances in technology which, in this parallel world, came in the 1950s but which we are only seeing now.
To say more than this would ruin the story, as there are two mighty coups of revelation delivered about a quarter and halfway through the book, which resonate through the rest of the story and are quite impossible to free from your mind. The impression I get, however, is that Ishiguro is less interested in the sci-fi aspect of this than in using it as an allegory for us all, the stunted limitations of many of our lives, and our blithe acceptance of our ultimate fate.
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Format: Paperback
I found this book deeply disturbing and was unsettled for a long time after reading this novel.

The story concerns a group of children who appear to live an idyllic life in school in the country, but an evil fate awaits them the implications of which slowly become clear.

I am very enthusiastic about Ishiguro's prose style, he writes simply and boldly, and the result is not stark but rather beautiful storytelling; each paragraph has an intensity worth savouring. The horror of their situation is revealed calmly, without any fuss or melodrama. The characters have only the language of euphemism to describe the fate which awaits them, and this helps keep the dreadful fate awaiting them a secret. I don't wish to spoil the surprise, by telling anything more explicitly, but suffice to say this is a story of a whole society's evil being visited on a group of people, and how the victims cope or don't.

I recommend this story whole-heartedly.
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Format: Paperback
First off, let's get this out of the way: this is NOT a book about the ethics of human cloning; nor is it (in any conventional sense) "Science Fiction". Not that there is anything wrong with Sci-Fi: I've read and enjoyed a lot of it over the years. However, this definitely isn't it - it has much more in common with Kafka than with Philip K. Dick.

Ishiguro's tale is both moving and sinister from the start, and gets increasingly so as it goes on. In a darkly dreamlike Parallel England, a self-styled "ex-student" at what initially seems to be a boarding school deep in the country is recounting (in a deliberately flat, almost Enid-Blytonesque style) the childhood experiences of herself and her best friends. However, Ishiguro makes it abundantly clear from the first couple of pages onwards that all of the "students" are destined for a sticky end: indeed, one of the main points of the book is that the students are fully aware of their eventual fate even from a young age. They understand this information on a factual level, and even make crude jokes about it, but they have never properly internalised the full implications. For this reason among others, they passively accept the inhuman horror that awaits them.

For me, Ishiguro clearly intends the book as a sort of dream-parable to say various things about the human condition in general. Firstly, if we grow up with a horror (nuclear weapons, say, or Third World poverty - Ishiguro silently invites the reader to make his or her own list), then human nature is to take it for granted as an immutable Fact of Life and just accept it. The eventual fate of the Hailsham "students" is one that no sane person could possibly endorse: and that's exactly the point.
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By A. Ross TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 28 Dec. 2005
Format: Hardcover
When my book group picked this book, I was very very leery. I had previously read, and been wholly unimpressed with "When We Were Orphans" and had no desire to give Ishigiro another go. Fortunately I overcame my skepticism, and about a week before our meeting I finally opened the book. From almost the first page I was enthralled and completely under the spell of the prose. I'm not generally a fan of highly mannered writing, I tend to prefer a little razzle-dazzle, a little style, but the precise and pitch-perfect narration sucked me under like a riptide. It is the best novel about nostalgia and memory I have ever read, and at the same time, it is a brilliant science fiction tale. Like all science fiction, the story has its own mysterious vocabulary, but it is told without the genre trappings that ghettoize science fiction. Ishigiro sets his story in a recognizable  mid-1990s Britain but with a significant and sinister difference. And like the best science fiction writers, he does not attempt to explain why this difference exists, or how it came into being, or how the technicalities of it work, he simply presents it as a given and lets his characters loose. Those who demand explanations and internal historical rationales for it are going to be disappointed, and are, moreover, missing the point of the book.
From the very begriming, 31-year-old narrator Kathy sets a subtly ominous tone by telling the reader she has been a "carer" for over a decade and that the authorities are pleased with her. It's a short step from this to "donors" and "recovery times" and other intriguing tidbits that announce we are in a slightly different world.
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