FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 14 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Never Had It So Good: A H... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Brit-Books
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Simply Brit: We have dispatched from our UK warehouse books of good condition to over 1 million satisfied customers worldwide. We are committed to providing you with a reliable and efficient service at all times.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Never Had It So Good: A History of Britain from Suez to the Beatles Paperback – 1 Jan 2010

4.6 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£14.99
£2.70 £1.25
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£14.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 14 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Watch the author talk about this book in Real Player format: 56K | 300K


Frequently Bought Together

  • Never Had It So Good: A History of Britain from Suez to the Beatles
  • +
  • White Heat: A  History of Britain in the Swinging Sixties 1964-1970
  • +
  • State of Emergency: The Way We Were: Britain, 1970-1974
Total price: £41.95
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Paperback: 921 pages
  • Publisher: Abacus; New Edition edition (2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0349115303
  • ISBN-13: 978-0349115306
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 4.6 x 19.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 57,537 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

A clever and engaging study of Britain as it prepared to swing into the sixties. Never Had It So Good is very good indeed (Amanda Foreman)

A wonderful book -- a most accomplished, readable and convincing tour through seven years from Suez to Beatlemania. It is refreshing because it probes beneath the surface of events, dissolving many of the myths of the sixties and suggesting, quite rightl (Lawrence James)

Unforgettable vignettes and revelations in this prodigious and ground-breaking study of British life. (SUNDAY TIMES)

It is a tribute to Sandbrook's literary skill that his scholarship is never oppressive. Alternately delightful and enlightening, he has produced a book that must have been an enormous labour to write but is a treat to read. (OBSERVER)

Book Description

A fresh, enlightening and comprehensive history of Britain in the early 1960s by a supremely talented young historian.

See all Product Description

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
There are many good things to say about this book. It is well written - indeed it bowls along like a fine novel - informative, entertaining and intellegent. But perhaps above all what most impressed me is the beautiful balance Sandbrook achieves between the political, the economic and the cultural. All of these very different elements are given their due respect and place in his narrative and consequently they combine together to give a vivid impression of what life was really like in the Britain of the late 50s and early 60s.

All of the heavyweight political figures are given sufficient space to make them live as individuals: Eden, for example, a man of high principle touched with arrogance for whom, perhaps, the post of prime minister came at a stage in his life when he was a little past his peak; and Macmillan, the Edwardian gentleman who was a whole lot sharper than he ever let on. Similarly the economics of post war Britain is explained in a serious and meaningful, but never dry, fashion. Cabinet rumbles over inflationary and deflationary budget options contain, in Sandbrook's hands, moments of surprising high drama with resignations and often rather childish temper-tantrums being far from uncommon. Similarly the scandals of the time, and in particular the Profumo affair, are given excellent coverage. It wasn't until I had read this book that I fully understood just why the affair between a fairly low-level minister and the (frankly gorgeous) party girl Christine Keeler rocked the Macmillan government to its very core.

But for me what makes this book a real joy - and what puts it above many other volumes of a similar nature - is the attention given to the cultural figures of the time.
Read more ›
Comment 31 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
How long ago were the Sixties? From reading this you would think that they were about the time of the dinosaurs: the espresso had just been invented, rationing and national service had just ended, and families in large parts of the UK did not have access to running water and electricity. Some of the facts contained in this excellent work are things which those of us born in the 70s are just not aware. I mean there is so much information in this book it is just about impossible to take it all in. This doesn't stop it being compulsive though; OK, in some parts it slows-up (I mean twenty plus pages just on James Bond could be considered overkill) but you cannot put this down, and that's saying something for a book nearly 750 pages long. There are nuggets in here which no-one born past 1950 would be aware of today; there are sections on Larkin and Amis (that's Kingsley for you younger readers)but also on now forgotten writer Colin Wilson, and it is shocking how racism and homophobia were much more prevelant than today. You can complain about the state of Britain under Thatcher/Major/Blair (delete as applicable) but Britain seems a much better place today than some of the scenarios laid out here. I'm looking forward to reading the next volume.
Comment 22 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By takingadayoff TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 9 April 2012
Format: Paperback
Never Had It So Good covers Britain from the years 1956-1963. At over 700 pages it goes into quite a bit of detail. It's the first of two volumes -- the second is White Heat, which continues the story to 1970.

This book was not on my radar but after hearing author Dominic Sandbrook give an hour long talk about his most recent book, State of Emergency: The Way We Were. Dominic Sandbrook, about the early 1970s, I was hooked by his style. He weaves together political history, consumer history, music, movies, books, labor history, and social history into a single, detailed narrative. As a reader who has few qualms about skimming when things slow down or get bogged down in academic jargon, I found myself reading nearly every word of Never Had It So Good.

Starting with the major event in 1956 Britain, the Suez Crisis, Sandbrook proves his ability to make history real. Until I read his account, I did not know anything about the Suez Crisis. I was surprised to find it was fascinating and tragic in a way that the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars of today will probably seem to future generations.

While I enjoyed reading about the politics of the time, I have to admit I was more interested in the advent of television in Britain and how the long post World War II austerity that had lasted into the 1950s finally gave way to the consumerism that had been rampant in America for the past decade. Sandbrook's entertaining history of the Butlin Holiday Camps that were like summer camps for the whole family was also memorable, and so was his informative section on the music that led up to The Beatles.

Only a few sections did not hold my interest. The political battle between Harold MacMillan and Rab Butler was tedious.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By S Riaz HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 16 Mar. 2015
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book, the first of two giving a social and political history of Britain in the Sixties, has been on my radar for many years. When it finally appeared on kindle, I thought that I could ignore it no longer and decided to finally get around to reading it - I am glad that I did.

Although this is the story of the Sixties, it begins in 1956 with the Suez crisis, and ends as the country heads into 1964. Dominic Sandbrook does a wonderful job of incorporating the cultural and the political. He paints a picture of the country in those post war years, as rationing ended and there was a greater wealth and consumerism. With ITV competing with BBC and supermarkets challenging local shops, people have different choices which affect their everyday lives. However, this is still a society which clings to traditional views and politics. Even as Britain copes with its changed perception within the world, there is a longing for traditionalism and opposition to the influence of the US, especially on the young.

The book begins with Macmillan seemingly safe as Prime Minister, but he is rocked by major events and scandal - particularly the Profumo affair has a real impact on his influence. Along with the Cold War, the threat of atomic war, the European Union, the changing Empire and immigration, satire was also an up and coming influence of public opinion. At the end of this book, we have Harold Wilson as the leader of the Labour Party and it is obvious that political change is coming - and welcomed by most.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback