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on 1 May 2017
There is something quite dark and dreamy about this album. For many years I wondered what was going through Kate's mind when she penned this. This was one of the many stand out albums of 1980, not purely on musical merit alone, but because nothing else like it emerged that year. I'm not hating on other chicks who rocked the 80's, you had Pat Benatar or even Carly Simon who was writing some decent material still. But nothing like this.

Kate's vocals are reminiscent of the previous two albums, but you can almost sense change coming. Her high pitch bewitching vocals, would soon disappear in favour of a silky smooth yet powerful vocal style found on "The dreaming" right up to "The sensual world" in 1989. Listen carefully and you can hear signs of a transition. "Babooshka" is oddly satisfying, with the slow piano build up leading into a repetitive but almost sultry chorus. The music video to this freaked me out a little as a child. In fact many of her late 70's early 80's videos did, but I was too young to get it so what the hey. "Egypt" almost goes off into progressive rock territory, with it's alluring mysterious keyboard section.

"Delius" is again repetitive, but extremely satisfying. You can really get a grasp on these songs some how. I now know it was written about the great composer of the same name, she saw a film about it as a child which inspired the song. "Army dreamers" is beautiful almost dare I say folky. "Night scented stock" is a beautifully layered vocal piece, which seems to me came from a very, very dark place. Reminds me of haunted houses or scary cat ladies. "Violin" is crazy as hell, and "The wedding list" is catchy but I have to say not one of the strongest tracks on the album, never did understand why it had a music video shot for it. The final song "Breathing" is epic. At the end when the guitarist (Ian Bairnson I believe) comes in with those power chords, over a very dramatic coda, while Kate's shrieking the lyrics, left me wondering for a brief few seconds if Kate had just gone metal on us.

One of the catchiest, yet darkest releases of 1980. I mean just read up the back story to "Blow away (for Bill)" Kate wasn't in the best of moods. But this right here is the delightful pop genius of another era, I'm wondering if I will see innovating contemporary releases like this again in my life time. I always loved Kate's piano playing. I know she's not the most technical player, but her choice of notes and her skill at song craft far out weigh any of the musicians I've ever worked with.
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on 24 January 2016
Never for Ever has Kate Bush sounding vocally stable and more confident, taking what she had put into her debut single "Wuthering Heights" from 1978 and administering those facets into most of the album's content. Never for Ever went to number one in the U.K., on the strength of three singles that made her country's Top 20. Both "Breathing" and "Army Dreamers" went to number 16, while "Babooshka" was her first Top Five single since "Wuthering Heights." Bush's dramatics and theatrical approach to singing begin to solidify on Never for Ever, and her style brandishes avid seriousness without sounding flighty or absurd. "Breathing," about the repercussions of nuclear war, conveys enough passion and vocal curvatures to make her concern sound convincing, while "Army Dreamers" bounces her voice up and down without getting out of hand. "Babooshka"'s motherly charm and flexible chorus make it one of her best tracks, proving that she can make the simplest of lyrics work for her through her tailored vocal acrobatics. The rest of the album isn't quite as firm as her singles, but they all sport a more appeasing and accustomed sound than some of her past works, and she does manage to keep her identity and characteristics intact. She bettered this formula for 1985's Hounds of Love, making that album's "Running Up That Hill" her only Top 40 single in the U.S., peaking at number 30.
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on 13 May 2017
Not many albums wear as well as Never For Ever; this remains as beautiful and strange as the day I first heard it in 1980. I can never quite decide which is my favourite Kate album but this is always among the contenders along with The Dreaming, The Kick Inside and Hounds of Love, all extraordinary in their own way.
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on 7 March 2018
I have had this album on vinyl since it's release and I still love it's musical genius, although it's impossible for me to choose a favourite amongst Kate's work this would be somewhere close, I also love the cover artwork, the music and the cover compliment each other perfectly. When ever I listen to Never For Ever I get a warm summer evening feeling.
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on 3 March 2012
This, in my opinion, is when Kate really starts to get into her stride. There are some really different and interesting writing, production and performances here and you can feel how much she learned making the first two albums.

"Wedding List" is a highlight (and catch the live version on YouTube with the late Mick Karn on bass, Gary Brooker on keyboards, Pete Townshend and Midge Ure on guitar and Phil Collins on drums), as are "Delius", "Army Dreamers" and "Breathing". And of course "The Infant Kiss" (swoon!) and the majestic "Babooshka".

"Never for Ever" is definitely a step between the slightly rushed "Lionheart" and the "The Dreaming" with its big productions, sound effects and guest stars.
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on 9 August 2013
As I have said in reviews I am a massive, if rather recent Bush fan. My quest to collect all her albums led me to Never for Ever, a mostly gorgeous album. In fact the only low point I can think of is Egypt, which sounds a lot like Hello Earth in terms of concept. There's a reason the humming sections always get a thumbs down from me: they're boring! The album also sees Bush try to link several of the tracks i.e. Babooshka and Delius or Infant Kiss, Night Scented Stock then Army Dreamers. A variety of themes are also explored, some light hearted and some actually quite scary (Infant Kiss) and of course my favourite rokk out track Violin. Essential Listening as ever.
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on 31 March 2018
Put it on. Sounds so fresh and interesting even today. My gut tells me is it will in a hundred years from now.
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on 8 October 2017
I love early Kate Bush and this album is wonderful, easily better than Hounds of Love, up there with her first album perhaps. Pretty good sound quality, too.
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on 30 November 2017
Amazing what a talent sounds so fresh. Influenced so many artists over the decades.
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on 26 December 2014
This album is a huge step up from her previous album, Lionheart. Kate's signature style that we all know and love properly starts to develop here with the songs taking on a darker and more polished turn. My favourites are Babooshka, Infant's Kiss (amazing, haunting lyrics!), Army Dreamers, Breathing (Both songs have absolutely captivating videos) & All We Ever Look For. This fabulous collection of songs really symbolises the start of Kate's blossoming into a musical icon.
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