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Never Enough Mass Market Paperback – 29 Jul 2008

4.5 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 373 pages
  • Publisher: Pocket Star Books; Reprint edition (29 July 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1416527176
  • ISBN-13: 978-1416527176
  • Product Dimensions: 17 x 10.7 x 2.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 5,390,982 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"Readers have a real treat waiting for them in Joe McGinniss's latest book."

-"Washington Post Book World"

"It's riveting and compulsively readable...McGinniss patiently unravels the case with plenty of fresh reporting..."

-"Entertainment Weekly"

"This is a mesmerizing tale, with more twists and turns than most steamy crime novels. The irony of two wasted lives makes this cautionary tale perfect reading for a chilly autumn evening."

-"Tucson Citizen"

"McGinniss brilliantly deconstructs the highly dysfunctional Kissels...you can't argue with his ability to tell a good story. Readers of "Never Enough" get front-row seats to someone else's family horror fest."

-"USA Today"

"McGinniss...makes it absorbingly believable."

-"New York Daily News"

"In McGinniss's compelling account, the Kissel family -- full of potential but riven by endless battles among the brothers and their sister and father -- represent the American tragedy in which ambition and the pursuit of wealth turn deadly."

-"Publishers Weekly" --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Joe McGinniss Jr. is the author of "Carousel Court" and "The Delivery Man. "He lives in Washington, DC, with his family. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.


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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

By lawyeraau HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 27 Jun. 2009
Format: Hardcover
I enjoy the genre of true crime, and this author is an excellent chronicler of the evil that men do. In this book, he focuses on the Kissel family, in which two wealthy, well-educated brothers are both murdered on different occasions and by different people. One was bludgeoned to death, and the other was stabbed to death. What are the chances of that?.

The book tells the story of two good-looking, well-educated, highly intelligent brothers, Robert and Andrew Kissel. Both grew up under the thumb of Bill Kissel, a wealthy entrepreneur, who was an extremely domineering and harsh father. Robert Kissel, the younger brother, grew up to be a brilliant and successful investment banker. He married Nancy Keeshin, a college dropout working as a waitress at the time that they met. Andrew, the older brother, grew up to be a real estate developer. He married Hayley Wolff, a well-educated stock analyst and former world class skier.

The book focuses primarily of Robert's story, with Andrew as the secondary story, which pretty much mirrors the way life treated them. Robert's story is the more interesting one, as it has many juicy elements, such as marital infidelity, a fascinating foreign city in which the murder took place, and the glamorous life style of wealthy ex-pats , all laid out against the backdrop of some gothic family drama. Andrew's story, on the other hand, is more pathetic. He simply turned to a life of crime, lived way beyond his means, and embezzled money from the cooperative apartment building in which he lived.

The author skillfully outlines the events that led to the murders. In Robert's case, his wife's infidelity and her obsession with Michael Del Priore, her blue-collar lover, prompted her to do the unspeakable.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I love this author's books. He always does a really good job although for me nothing will beat Fatal Vision, which remains one of my most favourite books, ever. The research/story behind this one wasn't up to that one's standard, though. I wonder with 2 brothers being killed why he picked one over the other and didn't tell both stories in the same detail. I preferred Rob of the pair of them until the stuff at Nancy's trial came out and that put me off him a great deal. I'd thought of the Kissel men he was the only one with a redeeming feature but clearly not. Bill was a sh*thead of the highest order who raised his sons to be the same, it seemed.
Nancy was an utter piece of work that at times seemed to live in her own little parallel universe. As usual with true murder cases involving the very rich they have everything and still want more.....never satisfied. She especially upset me over Rob's 40th birthday...I had to laugh too at how many times she said her ribs were broken. Seems they were permanently in pieces !!
I hope their kids are managing alright. I'm pleased they're away from immediate Kissel influence. It may possibly be their salvation.
I spotted a couple of apostrophe errors and one horrendous spelling of Greenwich as Green-which that was pretty frightful but that was about it. And once again Simon & Schuster have THAT cover issue they're yet to resolve as well which never ceases to irritate me.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book was brilliant. It's about a greedy selfish investment bankers wife who murdered him because she wanted to be with the guy she was having an affair with. This is a must read for anyone who likes true crime
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a very entertaining read for several reasons! It can only be non-fiction, for what writer could dream up a fictional group of such awful human beings?! The main characters and their families are about as dis-functional and loathsome a bunch that you'll ever read about - the kind you love to hate! The author did a fine job of research and telling the story to make it a page turner...I simply had to see what happened next! In the end, they got what they deserved.
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Format: Paperback
Joe Mcginnis cannot make any of this crew, the Kissels and their assorted family members-by-marriage seem, well, not unpleasant. Though nastiness is not an excuse for murder, it's hard, real hard, to generate much sympathy for either crime victims or perpetrators. Mcginnis does a good enough job wading through the sleeze, both in Hong Kong and in the US, in telling this story. But I'm left with thoughts that are better left unsaid in a public review.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I've never read a book by him that wasn't good. He's a really great author and I really enjoyed this one. Nancy Kissel was a greedy, black-hearted spoiled person, who deserves to rot in prison for what she did to her husband.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Rob Kissel is an investment banker expat living in Hong Kong making millions of dollars by scooping up debt distressed properties and selling them for profit. His wife Nancy Kissel is a kind of trashy party girl whose family has a little money who somehow latches onto Rob whose family has even more money. They have three kids after something like 15 years of marriage.

Rob works nights and weekends and is on the road a lot chasing after the b-goddess of monetary success (and perhaps some other things as well). Nancy has a Chinese housekeeper to pick up after her and a Filipina nanny to take care of the children. She spends most of her time shopping at expensive stores. The "never enough" in the title refers to both of them. Rob can never make enough money and Nancy can never buy enough worldly trinkets to satisfy the emptiness of her life.

Some years ago I read and reviewed Joe McGinniss' splendid true crime tale "Fatal Vision" about Dr. Jeffrey MacDonald who murdered his wife and two daughters. It is considered one of the classics of the genre. "Never Enough" is almost as good. It is a compelling read, the kind that will keep you up all night.

McGinniss employs a straightforward, unembellished style that concentrates the reader's attention on the facts as he has learned them through an obviously lengthy research effort and on the personalities of the players. He has reconstructed much of the dialogue and quoted from primary sources. McGinniss doesn't explain his methods but the result is an immersion into the life of two families set on self-destruction through murder, adultery, child neglect, drug abuse, forgery, criminal fraud, hate, unseemly fights over money, alcoholism, greed, and just plain stupidity.
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