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Networks: An Introduction Hardcover – 25 Mar 2010

4.7 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 784 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford; 1 edition (25 Mar. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199206651
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199206650
  • Product Dimensions: 24.9 x 4.3 x 19.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 83,409 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

Networks accomplishes two key goals: It provides a comprehensive introduction and presents the theoretic backbone of network science. [] The book is balanced in its presentation of theoretical concepts, computational techniques, and algorithms. The level of difficulty increases which each chapter [which] makes the book particularly valuable to physics students who wish to acquire a solid foundation based on their knowledge of basic linear algebra, calculus, and differential equations. (Physics Today, 2011)

Newman has written a wonderful book that gives an extensive overview of the broadly interdisciplinary network-related developments that have occured in many fields, including mathematics, physics, computer science, biology, and the social sciences ... Overall, a valuable resource covering a wide-randing field. (Choice)

Likely to become the standard introductory textbook for the study of networks. (Computing Reviews)

Overall, this is an excellent textbook for the growing field of networks. It is cleverly written and suitable as both an introduction for undergraduate students (particularly Parts 1 to 3) and as a roadmap for graduate students. [] Being highly self-contained, computer scientists and professionals from other fields can also use the book―in fact, the author himself is a physicist. In short, this book is a delight for the inquisitive mind. (Computing Reviews)

This book brings together, for the first time, the most important breakthroughs in each of these fields and presents them in a coherent fashion, highlighting the strong connections between work in different subject areas. (Cern Courier)

About the Author

Mark Newman received a D.Phil. in physics from the University of Oxford in 1991 and conducted postdoctoral research at Cornell University before joining the staff of the Santa Fe Institute, a think-tank in New Mexico devoted to the study of complex systems. In 2002 he left Santa Fe for the University of Michigan, where he is currently Paul Dirac Collegiate Professor of Physics and a professor in the university's Center for the Study of Complex Systems.


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Format: Hardcover
This book is comprehensive, well written, and accessible. As a biochemist studying complexity and systems biology over the last 6 months, I found it frustrating that there were no decent textbooks on networks. All of Newman's papers are excellent and must reads, but this book takes everything and puts it into once place (there are over 300 citations, so you can read the primary literature referenced if you want). There are sections on different types of networks (social, electrical, biological, etc.), network theory, graph metrics, and then more applied sections on the best computational methodologies to adapt, the best programs to use, models, and simulating events on networks. This is very helpful as most papers dealing with applied networks don't document what software or programming methodologies they use.

I should point out that you need an A Level Maths (or a good grasp of maths if you're willing to learn as you read) to understand the metrics and measures in this book. Some are simple, but some are quite complicated. If you're needing to go into networks then I highly recommend you pick this up as a primer, irrespective of your background. It's very well written and doesn't plonk you right at the deep end. At 700 pages, it isn't thin, but the size of each page is smaller than A4 paper, so it isn't massive.

If you're wondering whether you should buy this or Newman's older book on the structure and dynamics of networks, get this. The older book is just a collection of papers with commentary - a giant literature review. (not that it's bad, but that book does put you in at the deep end)
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Mark Newman's "Networks: An Introduction" is the single book that one needs in order to start his or her (postgraduate) research on networks. The book explains thoroughly and from first (mathematical) principles all the aspects of networks that a researcher needs to know: from structural properties and computer algorithms to network generation models and dynamical processes on networks. After reading this book, all the vast bibliography on networks will become accessible to the reader. This book is not an easy read, and requires a good level of mathematical understanding, but it is certainly one of the most rewarding books I have ever read. Finally, to put this review in context, at the time of writing I am a first-year PhD student in Computer Science.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Really useful book to give an introduction to many aspects of Networks with examples and ideas. Has a really useful contents page which allows finding the section relevant. The index is quite big and can get confusing sometimes.
Would recommend this to others.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Well written, touches some advanced topics but is pretty good at leading you through them. You probably need a mathametically background, though.
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