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NetBeans IDE 8 Cookbook Paperback – 27 Oct 2014

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

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Product details

  • Paperback: 386 pages
  • Publisher: Packt Publishing (27 Oct. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1782167765
  • ISBN-13: 978-1782167761
  • Product Dimensions: 19 x 2.2 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,426,062 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

David Salter

David Salter is an enterprise software developer and architect who has been developing software professionally since 1991. His relationship with Java goes right back to the beginning, using Java 1.0 for writing desktop applications and applets for interactive websites. He has been developing enterprise Java applications using both Java EE (and J2EE) and open source solutions since 2001. He wrote the book, Seam 2.x Web Development, Packt Publishing, and co-authored the book, Building SOA-Based Composite Application Using NetBeans IDE 6, Packt Publishing.



Rhawi Dantas

Rhawi Dantas is a software engineer from Recife, Brazil, with several years of Java development expertise, focused mainly on server-side development. He has a Bachelor's degree in Information Systems and is currently doing his Masters in Software Systems from Tampere University of Technology. He is also certified as SCJP, SCWCD, and SCSNI.


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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A detailed view of Netbeans.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2.6 out of 5 stars 8 reviews
1.0 out of 5 stars Exactly like one of those cookbooks that uses hard-to-find 8 Sept. 2016
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Exactly like one of those cookbooks that uses hard-to-find, out-of-the-way ingredients. Wait until you try to configure your wildfly server. I do not recommend this book.

I downgraded my rating after reaching chapter 11. It only gets worse after chapter five. Much, much worse. Good luck trying to figure out which referenced materials still exist and which don't.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars One Star 4 Feb. 2016
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
incoherent jibberish
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great refe reference 9 Jan. 2015
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Love the detail and helps out with shortcuts. To me Netbeans is the best IDE out there. Learning the ins and outs of Netbeans through this book it's great. I have the ebook
2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars One Star 10 Mar. 2015
By me - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Very hard to follow.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It is a great book especially for students and those who depart from other IDEs 11 Nov. 2014
By A. Zubarev - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Every developer should eventually master at least one IDE. I know many who never bothered. And I do not say you are less productive using only Emacs or VIM. But at times you have to rely on support of a productivity tool. Yet, it seems nowadays it is not quite possible to imaging developing for an enterprise and not utilizing an IDE. Reason is there are so many kinds of projects, not working with an IDE makes even at times impossible to deliver on time. Luckily there is one such book that will help you master one of the best IDEs around: NetBeans. Backed by the well known Oracle Copr. with its roots originating in Xelfi editor a decade ago it became a mature and popular development environment. I must add the book luckily covers the freshly released (Fall 2014) version 8 of the NetBeans IDE.
So more on the book: it covers seemingly as wide range of topics as one can imagine (or not) using at any workplace, from installing the IDE and writing its plug-ins (modules) to using WebServices and JavaFX UI development.
And the material is covered very nicely by David and Rhawi. The book is easy to follow and repeat exercises. The book has plenty if high-res images and is so well structured it makes a come back very easy (I needed a few re-visits to accomplish a task or two). What I liked the most was working with the RESTfull services (not only fun, but it delivers a great automation examples). Testing and profiling was a great skill to learn, a very important aspect, too, not just fun. Version control was very useful and the authors covered a lot of ground and many providers (I only expected Git covered). The enterprise Java was a tad more difficult to grasp, but again having such great teachers it is not intimidating at all.
In short, my verdict is 5 out 5. It is a great book especially for students and those who depart from other IDEs. I must say I liked NetBeans very much, even though I clocked more hours using the Visual Studio and Eclipse.
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