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Nature Futures: Science Fiction from the Leading Science Journal Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Length: 332 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product description

About the Author

Henry Gee was born in London in 1962. In due course he obtained his Bachelor of Science degree at the University of Leeds, and his Ph. D. at the University of Cambridge. In 1987 he joined the staff of "Nature," the international science magazine. He is the author of ""The Science of Middle Earth, """Jacob's Ladder, In Search of Deep Time" and (with Luis V. Rey)" A Field Guide to Dinosaurs. "The "Futures" SF column in "Nature," which he devised, garnered "Nature" the award of Best SF Publisher from the European Science Fiction Society. Henry Gee has recently moved to the seaside town of Cromer in Norfolk, where he lives with his wife, two children, and numerous pets.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 3050 KB
  • Print Length: 332 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books (24 Dec. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00HFUAPIU
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Screen Reader: Supported
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #374,412 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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By John M. Ford TOP 500 REVIEWER on 4 Jan. 2015
Format: Kindle Edition
Nature is a well-known and well-respected science magazine. As editor Henry Gee notes, "...many, perhaps most, of the scientific discoveries that have shaped the world (and the minds of science fiction authors) first appeared as research papers in Nature's pages." Beginning in 1999 and for several years after, Nature also included short works of science fiction. This well-received feature hosted a range of authors, from `names' in the genre to an eleven-year-old first-time author.

This book collects ninety-seven of these short science fiction stories. Ten of my favorites:

Brenda Cooper's "My Grandfather's River" is about a home-made present from a granddaughter to her grandfather. It's a piece of the past.

Paul Di Filippo's "The Perfect Lover" is another take on that scene where two lovers run toward each other in slow motion across an open field, arms spread wide.

David Eagleman's "A Brief History of Death Switches" describes what Earth will be like after humankind has departed. It explains the culture that will carry on without us.

Jon Courtenay Grimwood's "Take Over" shows how future society reworks the crime of identity theft.

Joe Haldeman's "Heartwired" is an enhanced love story that does not take place in a supermarket.

Peter Hamilton's "The Forever Kitten" is a story about teenagers and growing up. Or not.

Ian R. MacLeod's "Taking Good Care of Myself" is like one of those stories where someone travels back in time and kills his grandfather. Except everything is reversed.

Joan Slonczewski's "Tuberculosis Bacteria Join UN" explores one way that future politics can become more complex.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I got this for number one son who is in his second year of a phd because he refers to nature articles and it was favourably reviewed in my favourite blog, BoingBoing.com.
He loves it. Finds the articles are really thought provoking and I'm first in line to read it when he finishes it.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars 5 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Natural Flash 4 Jan. 2015
By John M. Ford - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Nature is a well-known and well-respected science magazine. As editor Henry Gee notes, "...many, perhaps most, of the scientific discoveries that have shaped the world (and the minds of science fiction authors) first appeared as research papers in Nature's pages." Beginning in 1999 and for several years after, Nature also included short works of science fiction. This well-received feature hosted a range of authors, from `names' in the genre to an eleven-year-old first-time author.

This book collects ninety-seven of these short science fiction stories. Ten of my favorites:

Brenda Cooper's "My Grandfather's River" is about a home-made present from a granddaughter to her grandfather. It's a piece of the past.

Paul Di Filippo's "The Perfect Lover" is another take on that scene where two lovers run toward each other in slow motion across an open field, arms spread wide.

David Eagleman's "A Brief History of Death Switches" describes what Earth will be like after humankind has departed. It explains the culture that will carry on without us.

Jon Courtenay Grimwood's "Take Over" shows how future society reworks the crime of identity theft.

Joe Haldeman's "Heartwired" is an enhanced love story that does not take place in a supermarket.

Peter Hamilton's "The Forever Kitten" is a story about teenagers and growing up. Or not.

Ian R. MacLeod's "Taking Good Care of Myself" is like one of those stories where someone travels back in time and kills his grandfather. Except everything is reversed.

Joan Slonczewski's "Tuberculosis Bacteria Join UN" explores one way that future politics can become more complex.

In Igor Teper's "Golden Year" we see how much Will misses his wife, Alice, who died from a lingering illness. Each anniversary he visits her recreation of the forest grove where he proposed to her years ago.

Vernor Vinge's "Win a Nobel Prize!" is about the role that concentration plays in professional success. It features an appearance of the kind of "focus" that plays a central role in the author's novel, A Deepness in the Sky.

This is a readable collection of stories with a few that are a cut above. It is a good mix of well-known and unknown authors, although the story introductions reveal that a significant subset was written by Nature staff under pen names. The length requirements, though certainly dictated by page real estate, have a positive effect. The hundred word constraints of flash fiction are loosened sufficiently to allow plot and character development and complexity while maintaining single-sitting readability.

Satisfied readers should follow this collection with the second volume of Nature science fiction, Nature Futures 2: Science Fiction from the Leading Science Journal.
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent for airport security lines 17 Feb. 2008
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a great book to dip into for a few minutes at a time. The pieces are short enough to finish in a few minutes each and they (mostly) provide decent enough food for thought. It's perfect for those times when you just need to stay somewhat engaged with your surroundings (waiting around for something to happen) but risk dying of boredom or frustration if you don't do something.

Don't think I could face reading the whole thing in one shot though....
2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Futures from Nature 26 Dec. 2007
By S. M. Lea - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Very interesting for those who like science fiction. The very short format causes most of the futures to be vignettes.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Perfect remedy for short attention spans ;) 6 Jan. 2008
By Alexis Gervais - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Having read these quite short (a page or two) stories when they came out in Nature, I can say you will enjoy them. I don't recall any that struck me with a deep fascination, but on the other end very few ended up in my mind's recycling bin. The novelty is in having so many "short short" stories compiled, allowing you to read something even with very little time on your hands, and in the nature of their authors, who weren't all science-fiction writers.
5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Delightful 10 Jan. 2008
By M. Noonan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
These are mostly 1-2 page stories, quick reads, but thought-provoking, and it introduces (me to) a lot of authors.
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