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Naming and Necessity (Library of Philosophy & Logic) Paperback – 23 Jul 1981

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  • Naming and Necessity (Library of Philosophy & Logic)
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  • Routledge Philosophy GuideBook to Kripke and Naming and Necessity (Routledge Philosophy Guidebooks)
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  • Philosophy of Language: A Contemporary Introduction (Routledge Contemporary Introductions to Philosophy)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 184 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell; New Ed edition (23 July 1981)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0631128018
  • ISBN-13: 978-0631128014
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 1.6 x 21.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 176,386 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review

"Brilliant and very influential . . . stands up as an impressive and enduring work of philosophy, outstanding in its sweep, clarity and penetration."― Colin McGinn, Times Higher Education Supplement


"When these lectures were first published eight years ago, they stood analytic philosophy on its ear. Everybody was either furious, or exhilarated, or thoroughly perplexed. No one was indifferent. This welcome republication provides a chance to look back at a modern classic, and to say something about why it was found so shocking and liberating."―Richard Rorty, London Review of Books

From the Back Cover

Naming and Necessity has had a great and increasing influence. It redirected philosophical attention to neglected questions of natural and metaphysical necessity and to the connections between these and theories of naming, and of identity. This seminal work, to which today′s thriving essentialist metaphysics largely owes its impetus, is here reissued in a newly corrected form with a new preface by the author. If there is such a thing as essential reading in metaphysics, or in philosophy of language, this is it.


Customer Reviews

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Format: Paperback
I'd just like to correct one of the reviewers below - Kripke didn't write for a restricted audience. The book is a transcription of a series of lectures he gave at an American university (I forget which), so if he seems wordy, this is attributable to the clarity of meaning lost in the transcription from spoken to written language.

The book itself is split into three lectures - Kripke can be summarised as arguing against the Frege-Russell thesis (the idea that proper names in natural language can be analysed as definite descriptions or as clusters of definite descriptions). His modal, epistemic and semantic arguments are contributions to this. He introduces the notion of rigid designation to support his claim to a causal-historical theory of reference for proper names, and extends this in the third lecture to a semi-Aristotelian scientific essentialism, a consequence of which is, if water is H2O, then water is necessarily H2O.

It's not intended to be hugely accessible, but it transpires that it is because it was given as lectures. If you want a more modern take on what is a very important debate in philosophical logic, then buy this book. If you don't, don't buy it.
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Format: Paperback
Kripke even if he is on the right side in a way is still awful like lots of modern philosophers because he makes complicated what is simple. Saying that the view that is put forward in this book is that somebody feels a pain, rather than pain being a purely biological phenomenon - therefore he'll admit that there is a thing called consciousness beyond being a purely physical outcome, if he does view that as the outcome. The problem is he then goes on to say that Robert has a pain or something, but all that really needs to be said is that "somebody" feels pain. a whole book on this one revelation?
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Before even thinking about serious analytic philosophy down from Carnap, Godel, Tarski et al, you really must start here.

The title is no snappy gimmick, the book simply does what it says it does: the book concerns the old analytic/synthetic distinction, sharpened by Frege and later framed as 'necessary' versus 'contingent'.

But if we name something, then is calling it such a 'necessary' or a 'contingent' truth? If this book melts your brainn a bit, and it certainly did mine, then beware that rather too austere logical-positivist tradition.

But if logic appeals rather than frightens, always room for one more inside. Try it and see?
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Format: Paperback
If you are in the analytic tradition of philosophy and you want to retain an interest in metaphysical and other philosophical debates, then this book gives you a means of doing this. Giving you a defense against some of the trends towards conventionalism and pragmatism and holism which aim to end the debate in metaphysics altogether. It also gives you some great arguments against reductionist views such as identity theorists in the philosophy of mind. The most key philosophical work of the second half of the 20th century in the analytic tradition.
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Format: Paperback
Kripke's work on naming and reference was a revolution, this book is essential if you need, as I did, to fully understand the roots of kinds and reference. I am perhaps being mean with my four stars, but I believe him to be somewhat wordy, not being quite as articulate as he is capable. I dislike any form academic inaccessability and Kripke is guilty of writing, in places, only for his peers.
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