£18.99
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Naked Statistics: Strippi... has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Naked Statistics: Stripping the Dread from the Data Hardcover – 5 Feb 2013

4.6 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£18.99
£11.36 £14.32
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£18.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • Naked Statistics: Stripping the Dread from the Data
  • +
  • The Signal and the Noise: The Art and Science of Prediction
Total price: £26.68
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Hardcover: 302 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 1st Edition edition (5 Feb. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393071952
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393071955
  • Product Dimensions: 16.5 x 2.8 x 24.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 351,462 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Two phrases you don't often see together: 'statistics primer' and 'rollicking good time.' Until Charlie Wheelan got to it, that is. This book explains the way statistical ideas can help you understand much of everyday life. --Austan Goolsbee, professor of economics at the University of Chicago and former chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers

Charles Wheelan, a professor at Dartmouth College (and a former Chicago correspondent for The Economist), does something unique here: he makes statistics interesting and fun. His book strips the subject of its complexity to expose the sexy stuff underneath. --The Economist

About the Author

Charles Wheelan teaches at Dartmouth College and is the author of the internationally best-selling Naked Economics (ISBN 978 0 393 33764 8).


Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Naked Statistics is a good way to remind yourself what statistics is about, or if new to the subject, get a solid grasp of the basics. It is a fine complement to a dry textbook, in that it covers the groundwork in a clear, approachable and entertaining way that is not overly mathematically demanding. Appendices delve deeper into theory and can be read or ignored as the reader wishes.

The first two thirds of the book is particularly good, breezing competently through key statistical concepts up to and including the Central Limit Theorem.

Many people may be drawn to the book because of the growing importance of 'big data'. Wheelan takes this topic on board with a focus on regression analysis, and is not afraid to discuss the pitfalls as well as the benefits of the more abstract 'darker' arts of statistics. However, given the choice between a candid acknowledgements of the fundamental limitations of statistics and an uncomplicated view that 'as long as its done well all will be fine', Wheelan goes in the simpler, more positive direction, even when cheerfully supporting claims that over half of the top-flight peer reviewed scientific papers that draw conclusions from the techniques he proposes are likely to be wrong.

Instead, Wheelan argues that brilliant statistical research simply requires brilliant researchers (guess who?) - and that brilliance is not about being good at the maths, but about a having a creative and intuitive grasp of what works. There are two problems with this. One is that observant readers may well spot flaws in the exemplars Wheelan presents as brilliant.
Read more ›
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I've read this book with the intention of refreshing my memory on statistics. What I found was a refreshing book, easy to read and follow, with some compelling examples to keep you hooked to the book. The book addressed some of the most important concepts of statistics, giving you some insight on the reasoning behind them. In conclusion, I would recommend to anyone who wants explore on the surface the field of statistics, or anyone even considering pursuing this field. For the latter case, this can be considered a motivational book for statistics.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This has been sitting on my wishlist for a while and bit the bullet and bought it when it was recommended by a couple of Professors for a "friendly refresher" of the basics of statistics, to accompany more advanced reading.

I wasn't expecting much, but Wheelan blew me away with the awesomeness which he squeezed into this book. If it isn't already, this should be on the reading list of every undergraduate at University. Heck, it should be on EVERYONES' reading list! It starts with an introduction to the basics and progresses into more advanced material. All along the way, he explains all of the concepts extremely well and uses examples to get the point across. It's a shame a lot of his examples are Americanized, but you still get the point he's trying to make.

As a graduate student, I kept up with this and found it a useful refresher and something which I can revisit to clarify topics in the future on a couple of the more advanced points. But, being honest, this is approachable for anybody with an interest in statistics and its usefulness in everyday life. If you have a really basic knowledge, you might have to re-read some of the concluding chapters once or twice, but Wheelan writes very well so I wouldn't expect this to be much of a chore.

Just to conclude, it's a shame that more statistics book aren't like this. He makes a terrifying subject A LOT more approachable and something (SHOCK!) that we can find fun in! Wouldn't hesitate to recommend to anyone.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a nice, broad introduction to statistics. I particularly enjoyed the use of diverse examples for how statistics is applied (or misused) in various disciplines such as medicine, politics, and crime prevention.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a really interesting book about the uses and abuses of statistics. It's a great read for anyone interested in understanding more about the data presented to us every day - how the experiments are planned, what statistical significance is, how causations are identified and how to assess the usefulness of findings.

My only criticism is that in the Kindle edition the equations themselves are unreadably small, but they are not essential for a casual reader.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By therealus TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 23 May 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
In the wrong hands, statistics can be a dangerous thing. In the right hands, there's still no guarantee that the statistics you're reading in your newspaper or on your screen are much more trustworthy. In Naked Statistics, Charles Wheelan provides a little bit of a toolkit to give the uninitiated a fighting chance of at least recognising the potential pitfalls in the analysis they're reading and to ask some smart questions about its foundations.

Wheelan lays out his stall pretty early, making it clear that he's not a numbers for their own sake person. Numbers to him are only of any interest if there's a point, and he proceeds to explain why statistics are, in the final analysis, potentially a useful and friendly set of devices for explanation and, quite importantly, identification of potentially the best way to respond to a problem or need in government or business. In generally clear language he explains the basics of descriptive statistics, correlation, probability, polling and regression analysis, as well as outlining some common pitfalls and how they may be circumvented.

The writing style is clear and lively, and the examples he uses are practical and engaging, although the sports examples are very much oriented to the American reader, with abundant reference to Lebron James, quarterback ratings and at bat averages. In some ways, from that point of view it's something of a complement to Scorecasting, a book that applies principles of behavioural economics to sports (explaining, amongst other things, the reason for "Fergie time" and home field advantage).

But it isn't by any means all sports.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback