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The Naked Pilot by [Beaty, David]
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The Naked Pilot Kindle Edition

4.5 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews
Customers reported quality issues in this eBook. This eBook has: Typos.
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Product description

Synopsis

Human error accounts for 70% of all aircraft accidents and using this as a basis the author examines accidents in terms of various psychological themes such as perception, boredom, laterality, communication and male ego. The capacity of man's brain and his ability to deal with the machines he has created have developed less in 100,000 years than have those machines in 100 years. It must therefore be recognised that it is human nature to make mistakes. From April 1991 Human Factor Training will be compulsory for pilots and the study of the human factor in all forms of transport is a growing area. This book examines the causes of accidents, offering remedies and solutions, and is aimed at the general public as well as the informed specialist. The author, who as well as being a RAF and BOAC pilot, has a degree in psychology and researched as a Ministry Psychologist on aspects of aviation psychology.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2421 KB
  • Print Length: 328 pages
  • Publisher: Airlife (16 Sept. 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0079Q04LI
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #293,970 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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4.5 out of 5 stars
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Generally a very good book, It would certainly not satisfy the tabloid sensationalists who seek to blame, as it sets out to properly analyse the circumstances surrounding what these idiots would put down to "pilot error". They really know nothing and, if anything, hinder the cause of improved flight safety. I feel it could be improved by distilling some of the passages or reducing repetition. It could also do with revising to incorporate more recent material. Every aviation professional should own a copy.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Have not read it yet. Taking it on holiday.
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Format: Paperback
This book's title is certainly eye-catching! Its formal subtitle, "The Human Factor in Aircraft Accidents", however, may put off some who would do well to read it.
The author is a former Royal Air Force and airline pilot who has spent much time studying the psychological factors contributing to aircraft accidents.
Although the main emphasis of the book is on incidents involving aircraft, including several well-known crashes, much of it is relevant to other modes of transport, and to many other activities. Several times I was reminded of things which can all too easily go wrong in my own work in software development.
The book will be of most interest to aviation buffs, who will spot a sprinkling of errors which have slipped passed the proof-reader to be caught by the last clause of the acknowledgements: "the views, opinions, and human errors are mine alone." (I like a chap who places a comma after "opinions" like that.)
However, I do not believe that the broader psychological issues are unduly obscured for those with no particular interest in aviation, and this is a worthwhile read for anyone with an interest in safety, or simply in getting things right.
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Format: Paperback
I was excited to read this book because I had at last found someone who was able to identify and discuss behavioural phenomena that I had noticed about myself while engaged in stressful outdoor activities: i.e. diving, flying or skydiving. I used to think it was only me and was not even aware of, for example, the word "laterality" until I read Beaty's book. I think his analysis of air accidents has wider applications in any field of human endeavour. By reflecting and becoming more aware of how we respond under stress we can achieve more through scientific analysis. One thing I found puzzling is why Beaty made no reference in the bibliography or text to another well-known book on the subject. I refer to Pilot Error: The Human Factors, edited by the late Ronald Hurst. Was it because Beaty objects to the term "pilot error", or was it because Hurst does not refer to Beaty's work in his book? Is there some kind of professional rivalry involved or does Beaty refuse to acknowledge Hurst's contribution because he was not a pilot? There's something going on there and I'm curious to know what it is
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Format: Paperback
I have flown several types of aircraft over the past 31 years and was fascinated by this book. Written by a former R.A.F pilot, I would recommend it to anyone interested in aviation. I donated my copy to a friend who was learning to fly and was equally impressed with the contents.

The author, I believe, died in December 1999 but his book will live on.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a serious book on a serious subject , and is a 1990s follow up to a similar earlier book which was a pioneer on the subject of crew interactions in aeroplanes and their effect on safety . This has become a compulsory subject in examinations for pilots' licences largely as a result of Beaty's work . The book shows step by step how some design factors can encourage mistakes by pilots ( the 3 needle altimeter, which often resulted in an error of 10000 feet ( ! ) in altitude is a classic example ) and examines how a build up of small problems can result in fixation on an unimportant one whilst ignoring potentially catastrophic ones going on in parallel . It is a fascinating study in psychology which has applications outside the field of aviation , and for anyone interested in aviation safety is an engrossing read which is just as relevant to the operation of aeroplanes now as it was when it was written
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As a purchase, absolutely fine. The book itself deserves a prestigious place in the history of Human factors and CRM. It is outdated now but but no less significant and has added value in that you can see how far we have come - or not! - since he wrote it. Well worth the read.
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Format: Paperback
Very good read. Gives a great insight to how various human factors affect pilots and shows how they are still human after all.
A good read and will keep your attention.
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