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My Favourite Things Live, Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered

4.8 out of 5 stars 21 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio CD (20 July 1998)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Live, Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Rhino UK
  • ASIN: B00000348A
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 27,808 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
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This 1960 recording was a landmark album in John Coltrane's career: the first to introduce his quartet with pianist McCoy Tyner and drummer Elvin Jones, and the first release on which he played soprano saxophone. It also provided him with a signature hit, as his new group conception came together wonderfully on the title track. It's an extended modal reworking in 6/4 time that brought the hypnotic pulsating quality of Indian music into jazz for the first time, with Coltrane's soprano wailing over the oscillating piano chords and pulsing drums. The unusual up-tempo version of Gershwin's "Summertime" is a heated example of Coltrane's "sheets of sound" approach to conventional changes, while "But Not for Me" receives a radical harmonic makeover. This is an excellent introduction to Coltrane's work. --Stuart Broomer

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Format: Audio CD
Jazz musicians, from Louis Armstrong to Miles Davis covering Michael Jackson's "Human Nature", often used standards as launch pads for explorations, and Trane does exactly that in this wonderful album. The key track is of course the title track: you will probably know it from The Sound Of Music (though I did not when I first heard it). But Trane makes it all his own: in a 3/4 waltz time, Trane takes the harmony with a soprano sax (a gift from Miles Davis) while McCoy Tyner plays some astonishing long solos on a close-miked piano and comps the rhythm while Trane solos to see the song out. What's fascinating is the way that Trane plays with the melody, bending and misshaping it, and how Tyner's solo stretches out, almost peering towards infinity, yet never becomes boring. Trane continued to use My Favourite Things as a concert standard thorughout his life - but forever making it anew, as he explored into dissonance, chromaticism and the free jazz of "Ascension" that he is perhaps better known for. (His version from the Village Vanguard near the end of his life is breathtakingly powerful but extremely dissonant - not easy listening!).

"Ev'rytime We Say Goodbye" is a lush tune, a cover of the Cole Porter song. It's a great reminder that while Trane was known as being a hugely powerful sax player, he always loved playing ballads. It's not quite up to "After The Rain" from "Impressions", perhaps his greatest ballad, but it's not far off for its sheer emotive quality, similar to "Blues In Green" from Davis' "Kind Of Blue" (which Trane played on, of course).

"But Not For Me" and "Summertime" are more energetic, with the latter having a bouncy exhuberance, and the former a manic compulsiveness.
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Format: Audio CD
If Miles Davis' "Kind of Blue" is generally regarded als the best jazz album ever made, "My favorite things" by John Coltrane has to come second. Containing four quite contrasting songs, this album sounds as a coherent piece of music and always keeps the flow going. The first two songs "My favorite things" and the Cole Porter cover "Every time we say goodbye" are my personal favorites, because you hear John Coltrane on soprano sax and McCoy Tyner on piano who plays some brilliant solo's. The other two tracks are in a bit brighter tempo, but equally good. The best about this album however is, that because it's so stunningly perfect, you can play it anytime, anywhere, and you'll never get bored of it. On the contrary, the more you'll listen to it, the more you'll appreciate it. No serious jazz collection can be without this album. Buy it!
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
If you are reading this review wondering where to start with Coltrane, this is a pretty good place. If the title isn't enough of a clue, the track listing should help you figure out that this is Coltrane playing standards. And playing them as melodic standards, not the free jazz you may have been fearing. It's an enormously accessible album - I defy anyone to resist the Cole Porter classic Every Time We say Goodbye - and a great showcase for Coltrane's skills. Unusually, the two "bonus tracks" even merit inclusion. It should leave you wanting to hear more Coltrane - I'd recommend "Crescent" after this - and maybe, like me you'll want to hear more of McCoy Tyner who plays piano wonderfully on both albums.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This classic album by the great saxophonist John Coltrane(1926-67) was recorded at the prolific sessions in New York City during October, 1960 which also produced the ATLANTIC albums 'Coltrane Plays The Blues' and 'Coltrane's Sound'.
With Coltrane(tenor & soprano sax) were pianist McCoy Tyner; bassist Steve Davis & drummer Elvin Jones who'd recently joined Coltrane's band.
Coltrane's playing is powerful and intensely moving supported by a superb rhythm section on four standards. Highlight, inevitably, is Trane's hypnotic 13-minute work-out on 'My Favorite Things' which he returned to again and again for the rest of his career. There's also a fine version of Gershwin's 'Summertime' with Trane on tenor.
This 2005 ATLANTIC MASTERS edition includes the two-part single of 'My Favorite Thing' as a bonus.
'My Favorite Things' still sounds fresh and exhilarating over 50 years later and is an essential item in any Coltrane collection.
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Format: Audio CD
In a way, one could almost say that an album where John Coltrane covers, arguably, four of the most popular songs of the 20th century (albeit of varying heritages), in this case Rogers & Hammerstein's title song, Gershwin's Summertime and If Not For Me and Cole Porter's Everytime We Say Goodbye, the listener is being granted something of an easy win. However, whilst this album provides a good (more accessible) way in to Coltrane's music, being built around a series of infectious (and generally well known) melodies, there is also a lot going on in his band of MyCoy Tyner (piano), Steve Davis (bass) and Elvin Jones (drums). My Favourite Things is also a notable album since it was the first time Coltrane was recorded on soprano saxophone, a sound which marked the player's gradual move towards more non-Western influences that was to be further developed on the Africa/Brass and Olé Coltrane albums.

This album is probably at its most conventional during the sublime, and relatively concise, interpretation of Everytime We Say Goodbye (which, given that it is one of my all-time favourite songs was never going to miss the target). Coltrane's soprano playing here is in its most deliberate and melody-following mode, which simply (and strangely) serves to make it all the more emotionally devastating, and provides a perfect platform for McCoy Tyner's equally impressive solo. Of course, Coltrane's version of the title song, apart from being an amazing interpretation of what is essentially The Sound Of Music's childlike ditty, was the piece of music that brought Coltrane to more popular attention and was to feature as an integral part of his live performances.
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