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Murder and Mendelssohn: A Phryne Fisher Mystery Audio Download – Unabridged

4.5 out of 5 stars 36 customer reviews

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By Damaskcat HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 7 Oct. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Miss Phryne Fisher has been asked to help her friend Jack Robinson, the detective, to investigate the murder of a musical conductor. He thinks Phryne might be able to find out more than he can from the members of the choir. Never averse to a spot of sleuthing, Phryne agrees and joins the choir herself. It is soon clear to her that everyone could have had both motive and opportunity. Attending a lecture on the science of deduction, Phryne meets up with a former lover from the Great War, John Wilson, who is working with the exotic, but cold, Rupert Sheffield.

This is a fascinating and fast paced story which really has to be read to be appreciated and no review could do the plot justice. The writing is crisp and humorous; the background alternates between glamorous and poverty stricken; the characters are interesting and complex and the relationships between them are extremely well done. Nineteen twenties Melbourne comes vividly to life as does the glamorous and resourceful Phryne.

I have read all of this exciting and entertaining series and I think this is probably my favourite so far. There are some absolutely marvellous scenes which I found myself reading and re-reading just to appreciate them to the full. The series can be read out of order but it is probably best to read them in order so that you can appreciate the way the series characters grow and develop. The first book is `Cocaine Blues'.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Mendelssohn's Elijah, an amateur choir and murdered conductors. Partner goes to sing and solve the murders but her main interest is in an old friend from the Great War who is suffering from unrequited love with a fiendishly attractive prig savant whomakes Sherlock Holmes look like a cuddly sweetie. Phryne solves the mystery, unites lovers, sings like an angel and reminds us how hellish was the Great War for all involved. Poignantly you, the reader, suddenly realise the folk depicted are only ten years away from the next descent into Hades. Weep if you will. I did. Bring on more Miss Greenwood. I could quite see Phryne outsourcing fiendish Nazis.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Thank you Kerry Greenwood for another cracking good yarn. I have been waiting for this for along time and it was worth it.I love the period details and the fact that there is a darkness behind the story which gives depth, I also know more about Mendelssohn than before and that can only be a good thing.The only downside is that I now have to wait for the next book.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Just for once Phryne doesn't solve the murder. She seems to be too busy trying to get two men together and too involved in them. If the murderer hadn't confessed we would have had a serial on our hands. Nice to know that Phryne can sing but although I enjoyed the book I did find it confusing sometimes.
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Format: Hardcover
Fans of the wildly successful “Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries” TV series are, no doubt, aware that they’re taken from Australian novelist Kerry Greenwood’s best selling series of books. Her latest novel and the 20th in the series, is “Murder and Mendelssohn” and, of course, features the wily, clever, wildly attractive, and talented Miss Phryne Fisher.

Set in 1920s Melbourne, this series certainly has become an international success, both in print and on TV.

Here, we find that famed conductor Hugh Tregennis has been found dead and Detective Inspector Jack Robinson needs the delightfully incisive and sophisticated Miss Fishers’ assistance (once again) in investigating the case. The maestro certainly has been murdered—and in a most flamboyant mode by a killer with a score to settle! But how many killers is Phryne (pronounced “Fry-ney”) really stalking? There are numerous discordant sounds (and the usual red herrings that belong to the mystery genre) arising before we get to the coda—and the ensuing applause.

But there’s more to this storyline than just the overture of Tregennis’ death. At the same time, Rupert Sheffield, with his dark curls and disdainful air, is taking Melbourne by storm. This famed mathematician and code-breaker knows all the angles and is confident that there is no problem he can’t solve! He’s certainly taken the heart of Phryne’s old friend from the trenches of World War I, John Wilson. Phryne recognizes Sheffield as a man who attract danger and is determined to protect John from harm. Again, she cleverly orchestrates the entire performance!

While Mendelssohn’s “Elijah,” memories of the Great War, and the science of deduction ring in her head, Phryne’s past (and she certainly has one!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As always such a good read and ( not always clean !) fun. A very easy fantasy read whilst on a long journey to America .I will keep my next purchase of Phryne Fisher for a similar journey. Helps the time pass quickly.
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By Roman Clodia TOP 500 REVIEWER on 24 Feb. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Ostensibly set in 1920s Australia, this is really one of those books which exists in a fictional faerie-land alongside the Daisy Dalrymple series and all those other books about high-society gels turned detective. Greenwood is clearly enjoying herself hugely in this musical romp as an obnoxious conductor is killed by having a choral score thrust down his throat...

What gives this series a slight edge is the overt sexuality of our heroine who is not averse to inviting various men into her boudoir before having her wicked way with them!

So this is cute and cosy with quirky and eccentric characters - good switch-off comfort reading.
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