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Mozart: Symphonies 35-41 Box set

4.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Conductor: Sir Neville Marriner
  • Audio CD (24 Sept. 2007)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 3
  • Format: Box set
  • Label: EMI
  • ASIN: B000UZ4EWK
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 360,552 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
  • Sample this album Artist - Artist (Sample)
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Disc 2
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6
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Disc 3
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4
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5
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7
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8
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Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

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Performances of classical works are always a matter of personal taste. All I can say is that these worked for me! I liked the tempi, the energy and the articulation. Six great symphonies, performed well, for a good price. Highly recommended.
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Superb performances recorded in a very natural sound.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Medium execution by Neville Marriner, much worst than the optimum execution by Sir Colin Davis (the best in my opinion). Poor recording, too "digital" in bad sense.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.1 out of 5 stars 7 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pure Delight 18 Mar. 2011
By Grady Harp - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
EMI Classics has done it again! This is a very solid set of three CDs giving optimum recording space to Mozart's Symphonies 35 - 41. The fact that this boxed set is offered at the price we usually pay for 1 CD makes it well worth considering as an option to enhance the Mozart section of the library. But that is only one reason. Sir Neville Marriner conducts the Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields in delicate, suave, airborne performances of these last symphonies of Mozart. The feeling is in line with Marriner's code of offering performances in keeping with what he perceives as the composer's wishes. The orchestra is the right size and carries the right amount of polish in each of the first desk players to make these symphonies sing. And, the ensemble sound is pure and vibrant.

For the small price of this release and the quality of performances here, this is a set of CDs that deserves everyone's attention - no matter how many 'favorite recordings' are already in the library! Grady Harp, March 11
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mozart at Abbey Road 8 April 2011
By Ken Palmer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This music was recorded in Studio 1 at the legendary Abbey Road Studios ([...]).

I'm a casual classical music fan, and was looking for a suite of Mozart's best symphonies - not just snatches of "greatest hits" movements lifted from symphonic context. It's remarkable how many of these symphonies are familiar. Each CD presents 2 symphonies, and runs approximately 60 minutes. The play times are perfect for my 30 minute drive to work, when I can be temporarily immersed in Mozart.

Packaging is the one thing I dislike about this set. While the artwork is modern, the set comes in a clumsy 3-CD jewel case where the middle CD typically falls loose from the plastic prongs. Thankfully, we don't listen to packaging.

Clarity, richness, and energy characterize each recording. Abbey Road sound engineers worked their magic so it's unnecessary to constantly adjust the speaker volume to correct for loud and soft dynamics. This is something I'm not accustomed to with other live recordings, where you might strain to hear an opening and then get blown away when the orchestra suddenly punctuates a louder section of a piece.

Sir Neville Marriner, a Grammy award winning classical music superstar, conducts these symphonies with precision, drama, and expressiveness. Never boring, this is Mozart at his finest - bold, brilliant, and energetic.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Mozart's last symphonies: Marriner vs. Menuhin 6 Mar. 2014
By Neil Ford - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
People like different things in their Mozart. Some cannot give up the 50+ year old recordings on which they were suckled. Others want what they imagine the music might have originally sounded like, which can sound thin and harsh to modern ears. Some dismiss any performance unless the conductor has been elevated to the pedestal of "Great Maestro". I like Mozart performed by a modern chamber orchestra. In principle I favour performances from the territory bordered by Germany and Hungary, but in practice recordings from the Anglosphere are much cheaper and more accessible, so I more often listen to Marriner and Menuhin. Listeners who are in the same boat as me may find a comparison of their recordings of the late Mozart symphonies useful.

Marriner is known for works from the Classical period recorded with the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields. This orchestra of experts always sounds clear, clean and beautiful, but Marriner's interpretations are occasionally glib, perhaps a consequence of the sheer amount of material he has recorded.
Menuhin is better known as a violinist. His conducting is less esteemed, but he has a special gift in Mozart (see his 1960s recordings with the Bath Festival Orchestra). In contrast to the sweet, romantic sound of his violin, when he conducts Mozart the performances are light and lithe.
To generalise the differences between these alternatives, Marriner is generally more plush in sound and relaxed in rhythm, with broader slow movements. Menuhin's sound is more string-focused and a bit harder-edged; his tempos are on the quick side and he skips more repeats in the score.

Symphony No. 35 "Haffner" (K385) - Menuhin
Marriner is just too easy-going, whereas Menuhin brings vital urgency to the outer movements. He also takes the minuet more deliberately, which is very telling. In neither recording is the timpani in the finale prominent enough (it's louder in Marriner).

Symphony No. 36 "Linz" (K425) - Marriner
In contrast to the above work, it is Marriner's approach which is better here. Menuhin seems rushed in the first three movements, whereas Marriner has an appropriate portentous weight, especially important in the slow movement. Marriner also seems to produce a bit more light and shade in mood and coloration, and a grander end to the finale.

Symphony No. 38 "Prague" (K504) - Menuhin?
In the first movement, Menuhin takes the opening adagio more broadly and dramatically, then takes the allegro with a sense of urgency. Marriner by contrast seems to be on autopilot here. On the other hand, Menuhin's slow movement is just not slow enough, so in the end neither is entirely satisfactory.

Symphony No. 39 (K543) - No winner
This symphony features a number of moments which sound Brahmsian to modern ears, so I imagine this work must have been an important influence on the later composer. Both conductors are nicely dramatic in the introduction, though Menuhin is perhaps more driven in the allegro. Marriner's vigorous finale is the more impressive, though in this work one of the St. Martin's winds seems to be a bit sour. Both of them are too fast in the slow movement (Menuhin is the fastest), which for me is a fatal flaw.

Symphony No. 40 (K550) - Marriner
Both conductors start out pretty well. Marriner takes the substantial repeat in the slow movement, which is emotionally effective here and makes the whole work larger in scale. Menuhin seems to lose a bit of interest in the last two movements, whereas Marriner is a bit quicker and with a convincing stalwart intensity. This is the outstanding performance of this set.

Symphony No. 41 (K551) - Marriner
It's hard to pick a winner here, as each is effective in his own way. Menuhin's athletic take on the first movement beats Marriner's more comfortable, less spontaneous approach, but after this Marriner pulls ahead, with more gravitas and a darker sound in the slow movement, and a more telling flourish at the end of the minuet. Marriner is more monumental in the last part of the symphony, which I think most would agree is a desirable quality here. His sweet orchestral sound makes a nice contrast with the more stentorian passages. On the other hand, Menuhin does get more contrast in the section alternating quiet winds with vigorous strings and brass. Ultimately I find Marriner more convincing.

As you can see from the above survey, Marriner comes out ahead of Menuhin, though Menuhin is no poor choice. A wider search will be needed for satisfactory recordings of symphonies 38 and 39.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Buona per completare ciclo Mackerras/Telarc... 4 May 2010
By L'orecchio - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
La numero 36 è la migliore,le altre a parte la 35 sono buone.Mi servivano per completare l'eccellente ciclo Mackerras/Telarc,che resta il migliore per le sinfonie dalla No.1 alla No.35!Evitate di comprare Mackerras/Linn,fanno troppo rumore a causa dell'impiego spropositato di ottoni!!!
5.0 out of 5 stars ... all of them from what I think are the best manufactures of top quality recordings (RCA Red Seal 28 Feb. 2016
By Lee Baron - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I have about 300 classical CD's--almost all of them from what I think are the best manufactures of top quality recordings (RCA Red Seal, PILZ, Decca and Deutsche Grammophon). These EMI CD's have the same high caliber sound. And not so incidentally, I believe these 6 symphonies are the best ever collection of classical music.
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