Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £9.49

Save £3.50 (27%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Move Along, Please by [Mason, Mark]
Audible Narration
Playing...
Loading...
Paused
Kindle App Ad

Move Along, Please Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 20 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£9.49

Length: 320 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Audible Narration:
Audible Narration
Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration. Add narration for a reduced price of £6.49 after you buy the Kindle book.
Ready

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

Review

"This book should be on the National Curriculum." (Iain Lee, BBC London)

"Amazing." (BBC Radio 5 Live)

"A good source of factoids, I’m thinking." (Steve Wright, BBC Radio 2)

"The facts just spill out over the pages - so much you can learn." (BBC 6 Radio Music)

Book Description

From Land's End to John O'Groats by local bus

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1187 KB
  • Print Length: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Cornerstone Digital (25 July 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00CQ1DH5G
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars 20 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #261,385 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By Bantam Dave TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 30 Sept. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
No doubt inspired by Bill Bryson, a few years ago there seemed to be an endless number of travel books being published in which the writer humorously described a journey they had made. Some were poor but there were also a few gems amongst the dross and, as I particularly enjoy this sort of book, I've probably read most of them. There aren't quite so many of these travel books written now and regrettably, Bill Bryson now seems to have moved onto other things leaving just a handful of writers, like Tim Moore and Tom Chesshyre, to satisfy my appetite. To this roster I can now add another name, Mark Mason.

Mason's previous book, Walk the Lines, was a fact filled journey around all the stations on the London Underground. It was a simple idea that Mason executed extremely well, producing a book that was not only informative but was fun to read. This has now been proved to be not a just a one off though, because in Move Along Please he has written a book which is every bit as good, if not better. For this book Mason has come up with another simple idea, travelling from Lands End to John O'Groats using local buses only. This is not the story of an epic journey across continents but instead it is journey that could be taken by almost anybody. Perhaps the reason the book works so well is because Mason is clearly not a hardened travel writer in the Paul Theroux mode - would a hardened travel writer keep all their bus tickets and plan to mount them in a book as a remembrance of the journey like Mason planned to do? Instead he is an ordinary man telling us what happened during his out of the ordinary journey.

I loved this book, learning a lot about Britain and enjoying Mason's observations about the people he met along the way.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I read this book slowly...... a bit like travelling on a bus, really. Little episodes of each journey. And I'd been to loads of the places as well so it was a nice bit of memory - but with some interesting history thrown in, or the author's very witty comments. I especially liked the funny footnotes. The author has a light, engaging style. The book is completely charming.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I absolutely loved this book. Mark Mason, for reasons best known to himself, decides to do the journey from Land's End to John o' Groats (Lejog, to the initiated) by local bus and to discover what he can about Britain and Britishness. On the way he interviews pub guru Pete Brown, place names author Caroline Taggart and others for their take on the subject, but the real interest lies in his eavesdroppings and his own observations. A pink-coated woman on one bus combines a zebra-print iPhone with a leopard-print handbag. Cromwell's troops, we learn, used Wells Cathedral as target practice during the Civil War and, as Mark comments, 'You have to question the usefulness of this practice. If you can't hit a cathedral...'

Perhaps my favourite bit is an observation on football, taken from one of the many books Mark is carrying in his 'library': `Nearly everything possible has been done to spoil this game. The heavy financial interests; the absurd transfer and player-selling systems; the lack of any birth or residential qualifications for the players; the betting... the absurd publicity given to every feature of it by the press.' Nothing unusual there, perhaps - except that it was written by J B Priestley in 1933.

Dip in and out and you'll find a gem on every page; read it all the way through and you'll laugh so much they'll through you off the bus.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Read,marks walk the lines book and quite enjoyed it,but enjoyed this even more,probably because its not London based,all human life is on the buses,and the snippets of overheard conversation are always intriguing.a gentle read,not laugh out loud funny,but gentle humour,well written and observed,worth buying!
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Mr. Joe HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on 17 July 2015
Format: Paperback
"... I'm loving sitting on these buses, cocooned in anonymity as their wheels roll slowly across Britain. It feels safe. A good place to watch from." - Mark Mason, in MOVE ALONG, PLEASE

Mark Mason, who previously walked above-ground the whole of the London Underground system and lived to tell us about it in Walk the Lines: The London Underground, Overground, here in MOVE ALONG, PLEASE recounts his experiences transiting Great Britain from Land's End in the southwest to John O' Groats in the northeast (874 crow-flying miles) via 46 local buses (1106.53 road miles). Let's not forget the last 0.53 miles!

I myself have driven extensively in Great Britain by rented car, and, at one time or another, have also reached Land's End and John O' Groats, though I can't claim to have done it in one sustained itinerary. Both locations were, for me, simply two destinations of many over multiple visits and meandering routes. I wouldn't have thought of doing it by bus!

MOVE OVER, PLEASE is not a travel essay for anyone who has no affection for the island that incorporates England, Scotland and Wales. Indeed, even for one who loves the place as much as I do, the narrative describes a persistent, single-minded effort of the author's more than a journey recounting worthwhile and wondrous discoveries for the benefit of readers. Indeed, 95%+ of the memorable sights I've seen in Great Britain are well off to the sides of Mason's bus routes and away from the towns and cities he stayed in overnight.

Perhaps the best parts of the book are represented by the author's sidebars about the places he briefly passes through and/or notable people who lived there.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
click to open popover