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Mother [DVD] [2026] [US Import]

3.9 out of 5 stars
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3.9 out of 5 stars 8 reviews from Amazon.com

Dispatched from and sold by M and N Media US.
£99.44 Only 1 left in stock - order soon. Dispatched from and sold by M and N Media US.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta) (May include reviews from Early Reviewer Rewards Program)

Amazon.com: 3.9 out of 5 stars 8 reviews
2.0 out of 5 stars Two Stars 26 April 2015
By Martha W. Hickey - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Plays fine, but no menu with chapter or scene titles.
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars 9 July 2014
By Fire - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Good story, a great older film and protrays a great deal of truth and history.
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars 24 Dec. 2014
By Timothy B. Lynch - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Well done. Many Thanks!
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Russian History 2 Feb. 2014
By Kitty - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This was interesting mostly because of the view it gave of how the Russian revolution got started and what started it. It was called Mother, because, I guess, the main character's mother played a small but important part in the event. The film also gives us an understanding of what the factory workers wanted and needed and an understanding of why communism was able to take hold. It's ideals, like those of Christianity, were at first high and desirable for the underclass, but like most ideals, they deteriorate over time and get lost, becoming like that which they are trying to escape from in the first place.

Christianity, as it is today, would not be recognized at all by Jesus. He told us to forgive but many are seeking revenge, he told us to love our neighbor as ourselves but too many are self-centered, he told us to heal with God's power but we persecute those who attempt to, and even those who boil herbs into tea and give it to the dying in an effort to heal them, for free. He told us to have one God, but we have so many other gods that they have a permanent place in our lives and we don't even recognize how much we idolize certain people, places and things. Maybe we shouldn't be so hash with our views of communism. Maybe we use that as a cover-up for our own lack of true Christianity.
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Mother of the Revolution 3 July 2001
By Mr Peter G George - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Mother is a very interesting Soviet silent film. The story is set during the unsuccessful revolt of 1905, the same revolt depicted in Eisenstein's Battleship Potemkin. The mother of the story is caught in the middle of a family conflict, as her son is involved with a group of workers organizing a strike, while her brutish husband is in a group attempting to put the strike down. In the course of the story the mother comes to understand why her son is involved with the revolution. She moves from servile respect for the authorities to sympathy with her son and his aims. She joins the revolution and makes her stand, becoming a symbol of what was to come in 1917.
Like other Soviet films from this period Mother is something of a propaganda piece. Heroic workers are juxtaposed with fat, gloating capitalists, sinister police and cruel judges. But the story is still exciting and brilliantly told. The editing is Russian style, fast and breathless and occasionally a little confusing. Images flash by so quickly that it can be hard to take it all in. However at times the combination of images is outstanding, as for instance when scenes of a group of revolutionaries on the march are combined with scenes of an ice bound river breaking up and becoming a flood. The suggestion is made with cinematic images that the revolution is as inevitable as the flow of the river and will eventually overpower any resistance.
The title role is wonderfully played by Vera Baranovskaya. Her face is marvellously expressive and shows how her character changes emotionally throughout the course of the film. The son played by Nikolai Batalov acts rather like a socialist realist painting, all smiling heroism. His character lacks the depth of the mother. Ultimately it is she who is the heroine in a quiet and determined way. Her bravery, in the end, is terribly moving.
The print used for the Image DVD is very good. It is clear, bright and shows very little damage. The soundtrack is more of a problem. It was added to the film in 1968 and has quite a lot of background noise. Moreover it has sound effects, which is a pity, as the film would originally have been shown with only a music score. The title cards are presented in the original Russian and translated with subtitles. Sometimes these subtitles overlap the Russian text and can be a little hard to read. Also it is rather disconcerting when a great long chunk of Russian text is translated with one word of English. The DVD may have some minor faults, but it is still, without doubt, worth buying, as Mother is a very fine film, a film not as famous as Potemkin, but in many ways equally as good.
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