Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £4.27

Save £3.72 (47%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.
Read this title for free. Learn more
Read for £0.00
with Kindle Unlimited
OR

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

The Most Distant Way by [Gault, Ewan]
Kindle App Ad

The Most Distant Way Kindle Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£4.27

Length: 200 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

Kindle Unlimited
Kindle Unlimited
Enjoy unlimited access to over 1 million titles and thousands of audiobooks on any device for £7.99 a month, including this one. Learn more

Product Description

About the Author

Since graduating with a distinction from Glasgow University s Creative Writing Masters in 2006, Ewan Gault's short stories have been widely performed and frequently published in journals such as: "New Writing Scotland," "Gutter "Magazine and "From Glasgow to Saturn." Other short stories have won the Fish/Crime Writers Association prize in 2007, shortlisted 2008, won The Glasgow 2020 Prize, and the Runners-up prize in The Scotsman/Orange competition 2005. Last year two of his stories were shortlisted for The Scottish National Galleries Short Story Prize and The Bloody Scotland Festival Short Story Prize."

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 3031 KB
  • Print Length: 200 pages
  • Publisher: Holland House Books (23 Oct. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00G5IU6PA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #718,420 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 6 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was a very interesting and enjoyable read. It is the story of two long-distance runners training in the Kenyan mountains.

The writing was very good - especially for a first novel - with a good eye for detail. I particularly like the two main characters and way the perspective alternates between them, which is fairly unique. This allows us to see them both "internally" (through their own narrative) and "externally" (through the other character's eyes) which brings the characters powerfully to life. We see their values, feelings, inner-world and self-justifications AND we see the other character's perception of them: their strengths, flaws, irritating habits. This makes them very real, and prevents us 'siding' with either - we see their true, inner nature without being suckered into their self-delusions.
We also see how well they truly understand one another (as compared to how well they *think* they understand each other).

The other most powerful feature for me is the environment: Kenya's Rift Valley. It's not somewhere I've been, but the description of it is engrossing. Especially around the different people, attitudes, tribal identities and the various foreigners. The dialogue also shines here - the second-language English is genuine. No one bursts into exposition, yet still the sense of political unease rumbles just below the surface.

Finally, the running itself is nicely described. With some experience of this from other training, it's recognisable. From the running mindset to the 'comedians' in the street... Definitely written by a runner.

In summary, this is a great book. I'd have no hesitation recommending it to anyone. It'll certainly be of interest to anyone interested in running, Kenya, or just desperate for a real character-driven story!
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is a fantastic debut novel, a confident, pathos filled work that sears the mind with sentences of real poetic intensity. Ostensibly a coming of age story set against the background of the Kenyan elections, it explores various dualities, mind/body, ambition/feeling, personal/political, and the meaning of home and of 'cleanliness' in both the physical and moral sense of the word. It loses one star because there are occasions where the prose gets away from itself and becomes a little lit-class self satisfied, but this really is an author to watch. I for one can't wait for his next work.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Most Distant Way is a book which captures the senses. Set against the backdrop of Africa, that most enigmatic of continents, the story is related by a young British couple, friends and yet at times deeply at odds with one another as they travel through Kenya. Both are in training in the Rift Valley where Kenyan endurance running is at its best.
Ewan Gault's clever writing allows the reader to experience the rank smell of poverty, the bright colours of challenge and humour, the poignant effect of failed relationships and the void between humans and their understanding of one another which ultimately leads to conflict. This is a thought-provoking tale and one well worth reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
click to open popover