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Moscow, December 25, 1991: The Last Day Of The Soviet Union by [O'Clery, Conor]
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Moscow, December 25, 1991: The Last Day Of The Soviet Union Kindle Edition

4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Length: 560 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Review

"Conor O'Clery's book is a tour de force. It tells the story of one of the most momentous days of recent history with insight, passion and precision. Full of new material and fascinating stories, it is a must read for anyone interested in the fate of democracy in the modern world" (Martin Sixsmith)

"Grips you from first to last" (John Murray Irish Independent)

"Elegantly written... a superb storyteller" (Victor Sebestyen The Sunday Times)

"A clear and exciting account of these momentous times, written by... one of the great reporters of our age" (Peter Hitchens Daily Mail)

"A riveting read... rich in humour and humanity and replete with assured judgments" (Judith Devlin The Irish Times)

Book Description

A fascinating, dramatic account of the last day of the Soviet Union and the intense rivalry between Gorbachev and Yeltsin

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 2973 KB
  • Print Length: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Transworld Digital (18 Aug. 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005I4DA8M
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #239,766 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Paperback
It is my sincere belief that this book should be praised, by all means possible. Therefor, I want to complement the only existing review so far.

As someone with a major interest in Russia, and especially its 20th century Soviet chapter, this was a marvellous read. The level of detail is so good that you can imagine being there, feeling the drama taking place.

Personally I feel it shows the USSR ended in a way which was not desirable, too rushed. Both Gorbachev and Yeltsin made some crucial mistakes: the former being indecisive, the latter believing a market economy would be successful in a country which had never had properly working institutions, let alone democratic ones.

I wonder if Mr O'Clery would ever consider writing about the Secretary General Y. Andropov and his plans for the CCCP?
Nikolai Ryzhkov, not to be taken lightly, believed that Mr Andropov could have changed and preserved the Soviet Union if he had lived longer.

Anyway, my only point of advice would be to have a little background in Soviet history before reading the book. Not too much, but being able to somehow imagine the state the Soviet Union was in when Gorbachev became General Secretary.
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Format: Kindle Edition
It's people that shape events and this great story of a momentous moment is captured in fantastic detail. Yelstin and Gorby are as good... and bad... as each other. Brings the events to life when the Soviet Union ceased to be against the backdrop of this massive country. It's still amazing to think this revolution was peaceful. And this book reminds us not to forget this outstanding achievement. Fast-paced read with surprising warmth and never forgets the human scale of big history
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Format: Paperback
The dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991 must rank as one of the most significant yet perplexing events of the 20th Century. How did this seventy-year old totalitarian monolith not only crumble but do so without a shot being fired? Well, as this book shows, it was a near thing.

In this highly readable account, Conor O'Clery follows the two leading protagonists, Gorbachev and Yeltsin, through the events of the final day of the USSR, December 25th 1991. We witness the hostile and tension-filled relationship between Gorbachev, the cool patrician statesman who introduced perestroika and glasnost, and the ebullient man-of-the-people, Yeltsin, as they plot and scheme their way through the minefields of Soviet politics, each struggling to take themselves and their country in different directions against a backdrop of domestic unrest and international disquiet. Not least among the worries of the international community is what will happen to the black suitcase, the key to the USSR's nuclear arsenal,if the power games of the Russian political elite get out of control. This is politics played for high stakes and requiring survival skills of a high order. Open clashes in the forums of the state apparatus are accompanied by worries about eavesdropping by the security services, the loss of office and its perks and even of a sudden appointment with the firing squad. Seeing these heavyweights in close combat makes the Blair-Brown spat look like handbags at dawn.

This book is both factually illuminating and imaginatively engaging. If you want to understand what happened to the USSR, this is a great place to start.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A very interesting point of view tale from all sides. Very interesting.
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