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Moscow Bound (The Puppet Meisters Trilogy) Paperback – 15 Apr 2014

4.8 out of 5 stars 65 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Silverwood Books (15 April 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1781322007
  • ISBN-13: 978-1781322000
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 1.9 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (65 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 504,303 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Review

'Moscow Bound by Adrian Churchward, as far as I'm concerned, is nothing short of a masterpiece of political fiction...the novel suckered me in from the opening chapter and once I was drawn in, I literally couldn't pull myself away from this fascinating, intriguing, and often startling plot.' Charlotte Barnes, Mad Hatter Reviews

About the Author

Between 1984 and 1998 Adrian Churchward lived and worked in Moscow, Budapest and Prague as an East-West trade lawyer, representing British, American and German corporations. During this period he became proficient in translating Russian commercial and legal texts into English. He was one of the few Western lawyers working in the day-to-day arena of President Gorbachev's liberalisation process of perestroika and glasnost, and which ultimately resulted in the collapse of communism and disintegration of the Soviet Union. In 1991, he witnessed the abortive coup against Gorbachev and in 1993, he was again present in Moscow when Yeltsin ordered the shelling of the Russian parliament building, aka the "The Russian White House". He lives in London, has two daughters, three grandsons and a cat that eats furniture. Read more about Adrian at www.adrianchurchward.com.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
Moscow bound is a mystery set in and around Moscow in 2013. It begins with a murder of a lone man. The rest of the tale is spread over a time period of just over a week, filled with plenty of action. We meet Scott Mitchell, a human rights lawyer who has just won a case in the European courts against the Russian military.

Scott bravely returns to Moscow where he works, but he's upset a powerful enemy and his return to Russia is not an easy one. The publicity he has gained sends a new client to him. Ekaterina Romanova is searching for her father who has been held captive without trial for many years. She only has one thread of a trail to start their search but when they get caught on camera at the scene of a crime more than one set of people want to know more about them.

Is Ekaterina telling Scott the truth? What is she not telling him? Why is General Pravda interested in their search and just who can you trust in a country which often shoots first and asks questions later? As the Russian people embrace some of their newer freedom, the old men who ruled with iron fists are dying off, but fighting within still exists and will anyone in Russia ever learn to trust again? There are many twists and turns in the book which kept me glued to the pages to find out just who or what is drawn Moscow Bound.

This review is based on a free copy of the book given to me by the author.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An easy read, but requires concentration. The story line twists and turns and demands you turn the page. Whist set in modern Russia the tentacles of the Soviet era give the story spice. Conspiracy,crime and compassion its got it all. A super novel that would be the base of a very good movie script
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Format: Paperback
I read Moscow Bound over a period of 4 days and evenings. I didn't want to put it down. I especially liked the building of tension all the way through the story with one event setting the stage for the next. The descriptions--locations, how long it would take to get from one crisis to the next by car, and problems such as parking or cars that would not start because of the cold--grounded the reader. Relief from tension was provided by mention of similarities between the situation and things familiar to the reader--Columbo, Law & Order, and tennis quotes. Throughout the story, the reader experienced the changes that occurred in two men--Pravda, a Russian, and Mitchell, an Englishman--as each struggled to do what he thought was right. The ending left the reader wanting more.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this book and couldn't put it down - I had to know what was going to happen next.
I would certainly recommend this book and am looking forward to reading part 2.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Gripping, thrilling and a wonderful insight on a time that you thought had gone but is coming back with a vengeance. Well written and thoroughly enjoyed.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Finished the book in two sittings and thoroughly enjoyed the Friday night in doing so.

The main setting is modern day Russia, with the spectre of communism haunting the corridors of power. The Russian secret service, whilst fighting amongst itself, is investigating a prominent British lawyer, who is running his own investigation against the Russian state and against the clock. As the two approach a common point, a secret of such tantamount importance risks exposure that all bets are off... and it will be the last man standing.

Finished the final chapter with a smile, many questions and have found myself thinking about it a few days since.

Aimed at those who enjoy an easy read with a cunning plot, fast pace and growing suspense. The author achieves the fine balance of realism, historical fact and entertaining story line.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a deeply, well-plotted espionage novel which more than matches any other I have read in a long time. The story is convoluted and one has to concentrate to follow the problems which beset the hero, Scott Mitchell, a British Human Rights Lawyer living in Moscow.
The author, Adrian Churchward, clearly has an encyclopaedic knowledge of Moscow and things Russian. We get furtive insights into the internal conflicts between the various Russian Intelligence Services and glimpses of the distorted world in which they play out their venomous activities; these are mixed in with the power and ruthless anarchy of the oligarchs. The pace of the story builds up as does the suspense.
Scott Mitchell’s adventures are labyrinthine and compelling: just the combination to make this a very exciting thriller which, once you start it, you cannot put down.
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Format: Paperback
According to his biographical note, Adrian Churchward lived and worked in Moscow, Budapest, and Prague as an East-West trade lawyer between 1984 and 1998. He was "one of the few Western lawyers working in the day-to-day arena of President Gorbachev's liberalization process of perestroika and glasnost."

Scott Mitchell, one of the two point-of-view characters in Moscow Bound, is a young British human-rights lawyer who is living and working in Moscow. When the book opens, Scott, flying back to Moscow, has just won a significant case against the Russian army in the European Court of Human Rights for its crimes in Chechnya. This has had two effects: Scott is a hero to Chechnyians (which gives him at least a few people he can trust in Moscow's house of mirrors), and he has pissed off the Russian army (which removes him from the plane under guard and interrogates him).

Now add a gorgeous young Russian mother, separated from her oligarch husband (powerful enough to dine occasionally with Putin). Ekaterina, who with good reason does not trust the Russian government, asks Scott to help her find the father she never knew, someone spirited away by the KGB years before. Scott reluctantly decides to help her.

Now add a second POV character, Lieutenant-General Pravda of the GRU, military intelligence. A body has been fished out of the Moscow River, someone who Pravda knows should not have been in Moscow, someone who has been assassinated in a particularly suspicious manner. When an elderly pensioner is murdered in the same way, Pravda, an honest and patriotic soldier, realizes an explosive military secret is at risk.

The book is a lot of fun and I gobbled it down.
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