Buy used:
£4.96
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by musicMagpie
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Buy with confidence from a huge UK seller, all items despatched next day directly from the UK. All items are quality guaranteed.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

More of the Monkees Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered, Import

4.4 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

See all 15 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Audio CD, Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered, 23 Dec 1999
£25.07 £4.96
Available from these sellers.
5 new from £25.07 6 used from £4.96


What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?


Product details

  • Audio CD (23 Dec. 1999)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered, Import
  • Label: Wea/Rhino
  • ASIN: B0000033DX
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 692,046 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. She
  2. When Loves Comes Knocking (At Your Door)
  3. Mary, Mary
  4. Hold On Girl
  5. Your Auntie Grizelda
  6. (I'm Not Your) Steppin' Stone
  7. Look Out (Here Comes Tomorrow)
  8. The Kind of Girl I Could Love
  9. The Day We Fall In Love
  10. Sometime In The Morning
  11. Laugh
  12. I'm A Believer
  13. Don't Listen To Linda
  14. I'll Spend My Life With You
  15. I Don't Think You Know Me
  16. Look Out (Here Comes Tomorrow)
  17. I'm A Believer

Product description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 7 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
This was the album which Michael Nesmith proclaimed "the worst album in the history of the world" when it was originally released in January 1967, due to the fact that it was assembled and released while the group was on a mid-winter tour of the U.S. midwest and so without any direct knowledge or input by the group, who had been promised the opportunity to make their own second album. The furor which resulted from the release of "More of the Monkees" widened the rift between the group and Musical Supervisor Don Kirshner and contributed to his eventual departure from the project, which, in turn, ultimately cleared the way for the group to head into RCA Records' Hollywood studios to record their far-superior third disc "Headquarters". It was on Headquarters that the group came into its own, selecting the songs and playing their own instruments as a band on all the tracks, thus disproving their critics accusations once and for all for anyone open-minded enough to really listen without prejudices.
All that said, this is by no means "the worst album in the history of the world", and, save for one excruciatingly B-AA-A-D track (Davy Jones' hyper-treacly, spoken-word "The Day We Fall In Love") has held up far better than anyone had the right to believe it would. It is, in my opinion, quite a nice little slice of catchy, well-produced-and-played mid-60s pop which has held up far better than a lot of the hipper, "serious" 60s pop and rock of the time--think Vanilla Fudge, Moby Grape, the Strawberry Alarm Clock and Iron Butterfly here.
Read more ›
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
There is something of a rough charm about this album which seems to be an amalgam of songwriting talent thrown together at times in a rather haphazard way. Some of the big guns were wheeled out to help the Monkees who were limited once again mainly to vocals.

There is an underlying tension in the album with musical supervisor Don Kirshner exhibiting a control over proceedings that led Mike Nesmith to label it "The Worst Album in the History of the World." It may not be a great album but it certainly doesn't deserve that title.

At times patchy, it does manage to mix early r and b with more jaunty tunes that made the group famous. With Carole King, Gerry Goffin, Neil Sedaka and Neil Diamond penning songs, it was always going to be a massively high selling album and so it turned out. At times it leans towards Merseybeat with Davy Jones' vocals giving a decided Brit feel to it. On other occasions there is more of a nodding acquaintance with West Coast pop and the likes of the Byrds.
The Day we Fall in Love and Auntie Grizelda are at times embarrassing but there is enough here in the shape of classic songs like I'm A Believer to keep the interest going.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Vinyl Verified Purchase
Mary Mary is one of the grooviest 60s numbers ever and it was written by Mike Nesmith!
Micky dolenz and the wool hat made The Monkees!
Peter tork made a good contribution as well but I reckon Davy Jones just came along for the ride and something for the girls to scream at
But saying that they wouldn't have been the same without him
they where the first and best American boy band never to be beaten
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
I have been thinking that "The Monkees," the television show, was a precursor of MTV in that it showed that if the Monkees, the group often disparaged as the Pre-Fab Four, could get a couple of their songs on television each week, then they could be a big success. Their second album, "More of the Monkees," was rush released on January 10, 1967 (the cover art was taken from a J.C. Penney ad), three months after their debut effort, and went to number one on the Billboard album charts.
The formula that worked so well with their first album continues here in that you have a whole bunch of talented songwriters writing songs for different members of the band. A key regard in which the Monkees were like the Beatles was that each group had a pair of primary singers, a third who would write his own songs to sing, and a fourth who could be tossed as bone now and then (e.g., Peter Tork's "Your Auntie Grizelda"). There is a big difference between a song sung by Mickey Dolenz and one sun by Davy Jones, which this album amply proves with the first tracks on each side, where we have "She" and "Look Out (Here Comes Tomorrow)." The strangest thing about the album is that there were only two singles, with "I'm a Believer" going to #1 for seven straight weeks and "(I'm Note Your) Steppin' Stone" only making it to #20. The disparity there is easy to explain because as I remember it the former came out before the album and the latter afterwards, and once we had the album we did not need the singles (but I remember feeling bad that we were not living up to our responsibilities as fans by not buying all of the singles).
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Look for similar items by category