Buy Used
£1.35
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Unbeatable customer service, and we usually ship the same or next day. Over one million satisfied customers!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Moonlight and Vines (Vampire Cat) Mass Market Paperback – 13 Dec 1999

3.3 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
£20.55 £1.35
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 461 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books; 1st Mass Market Ed edition (13 Dec. 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812565495
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812565492
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 3.1 x 17 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,314,427 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"De Lint is a romantic; he believes in... the power of... fiction-to open our eyes to a larger world."

" De Lint is a romantic; he believes in the great things, faith, hope, and charity (especially if love is included in that last), but he also believes in the power of magic-- or at least the magic of fiction-- to open our eyes to a larger world." --"Edmonton"" Journal" on "Moonlight and Vines"

" What makes de Lint's particular brand of fantasy so catchy is his attention to the ordinary. Like great writers of magic realism, he writes about people in the world we know, encountering magic as part of that world."
--"Booklist"" on The Onion Girl"""

" De Lint is a romantic, a believer in human potential, and his fiction is populated not only with creatures of myth, but with artists and social workers, musicians and runaways, all creating intentional communities based on hope and dreams and mutual belief in the magic of the world around us. To read de Lint is to fall under the spell of a master storyteller, to be reminded of the greatness of life, of the beauty and majesty lurking in shadows and empty doorways."
--"Quill and Quire" on "Forests of the Heart"

"De Lint is as engaging a stylist as Stephen King, but considerably more inventive and ambitious."
--"Toronto"" Globe and Mail" on "Trader"
""
" One of the world's leading fantasists." "--Toronto Star" on Charles de Lint


"De Lint is a romantic; he believes in the great things, faith, hope, and charity (especially if love is included in that last), but he also believes in the power of magic--or at least the magic of fiction--to open our eyes to a larger world."
--"Edmonton"" Journal" on "Moonlight and Vines"

"What makes de Lint's particular brand of fantasy so catchy is his attention to the ordinary. Like great writers of magic realism, he writes about people in the world we know, encountering magic as part of that world."
--"Booklist"" on The Onion Girl"""

"De Lint is a romantic, a believer in human potential, and his fiction is populated not only with creatures of myth, but with artists and social workers, musicians and runaways, all creating intentional communities based on hope and dreams and mutual belief in the magic of the world around us. To read de Lint is to fall under the spell of a master storyteller, to be reminded of the greatness of life, of the beauty and majesty lurking in shadows and empty doorways."
--"Quill and Quire" on "Forests of the Heart"

"De Lint is as engaging a stylist as Stephen King, but considerably more inventive and ambitious."
--"Toronto"" Globe and Mail" on "Trader"
""

"One of the world's leading fantasists."
"--Toronto Star" on Charles de Lint


De Lint is a romantic; he believes in the great things, faith, hope, and charity (especially if love is included in that last), but he also believes in the power of magic or at least the magic of fiction to open our eyes to a larger world. "Edmonton Journal on Moonlight and Vines"

What makes de Lint's particular brand of fantasy so catchy is his attention to the ordinary. Like great writers of magic realism, he writes about people in the world we know, encountering magic as part of that world. "Booklist on The Onion Girl"
""

De Lint is a romantic, a believer in human potential, and his fiction is populated not only with creatures of myth, but with artists and social workers, musicians and runaways, all creating intentional communities based on hope and dreams and mutual belief in the magic of the world around us. To read de Lint is to fall under the spell of a master storyteller, to be reminded of the greatness of life, of the beauty and majesty lurking in shadows and empty doorways. "Quill and Quire on Forests of the Heart"

De Lint is as engaging a stylist as Stephen King, but considerably more inventive and ambitious. "Toronto Globe and Mail on Trader"

One of the world's leading fantasists. "Toronto Star on Charles de Lint"" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Born in Holland in 1951, Charles de Lint grew up in Canada, with a few years off in Turkey, Lebanon, and Switzerland. Although his first novel was 1984's "The Riddle of the Wren," it was with" Moonheart," published later that same year, that de Lint made his mark, and established him at the forefront of "urban fantasy," modern fantasy storytelling set on contemporary city streets. " Moonheart "was set in and around "Newford," an imaginary modern North American city, and many of de Lint's subsequent novels have been set in Newford as well, with a growing cast of characters who weave their way in and out of the stories. The Newford novels include" Spirit Walk, Memory and Dream, Trader, Someplace To Be Flying, Forests of the Heart, The Onion Girl, "and" Spirits in the Wires." In addition, de Lint has published several collections of Newford short stories, including "Moonlight and Vines," for which he won the World Fantasy Award. Among de Lint's many other novels are "Mulengro, Jack the Giant-Killer, "and" The Little Country." Married since 1980 to his fellow musician MaryAnn Harris, Charles de Lint lives in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I have been a fan of Charles DeLint ever since a friend handed me "Dreams Underfoot" and said "Read it, you'll like it." I did and I loved the book. Now, it seems like forever between Mr. DeLint's books and I scour bookstores, hoping that a new one has magically appeared overnight. With his books, one never knows. In this collection of short stories, we follow his characters as they deal with the puzzles that perplex many of us. Who am I? Where am I going? Have I made the right choices? Through his characters, Mr. DeLint tells us that it is good to question, and not to be afraid of the answers. And as added spice, he throws in the "other" inhabitants of Newford. Ghosts, fairies and shape-shifters to name a few. If you have never read any of his Newford Collection, I suggest starting at the beginning with "Dreams Underfoot" and then onto "Memory and Horn" and finally "Moonlight and Vines". By the time you finish the last book, the characters are old friends that you expect to stop over for coffee at any moment. Expect to dive into this book and not want to surface for a least a weekend.
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on 23 Aug. 1999
Format: Hardcover
I always thought of myself as a die hard de lint fan. I died but I went to hell. I can't understand what happened between moonheart and this but you can feel the magic wanting to break through and being bogged down in politics. I'm sorry, but I can't really find anything good to say about this book other than it had his name on the cover. I'm going to cry now in a corner and hope he produces something a little less....dry in the future
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
like many hardcore delint fans, i was waiting with great anticipation for his latest book. his newest book while quite good,lacks the impact of his other collections. Mr. Delint has chosen to introduce all new characters in his newest book and they just arent as interesting as his regulars,who do make cameo appearances.Buy this book if you are a big fan but be aware he has produced better fiction.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
With "Moonlight and Vines" Mr. De Lint returns his readers to the familiar streets of Newford, reacquainting us with characters well known and loved and a few new ones. While his first collection, "Dreams Underfoot," had the sprightly, fey spirit of Jilly Coppercorn tripping through it; and the second "The Ivory and the Horn," the low murmur of a Native American drumming; this third collection, has taken a darker, more Gothic turn. Cemeteries and nighttime figure largely, poetically in the settings, whether an actual place or mood met within the characters, is up to the reader to decide.
One of Mr. De Lint's talents has ever been displaying the hidden corners of an individual's soul, touching upon a common chord of sadness or despair, then clearing a path through it. He promotes what some might consider an old-fashioned concept: there is always hope and a way to get beyond one's own pain. That he is able to do this, without sounding like a wide-eyed Pollyanna, is a true gift. Reminded of the interconnectedness of everything, his characters and the reader emerge from the pages with the feeling that through their actions and compassion, they can change the world.
The value of dreaming, highlighted in "If I Close My Eyes Forever," gives a nod and a smile to Neil Gaiman's equally rich world of the Endless. "The Invisibles" teaches an artist that not only street people can lose their shape and identity. Anyone who has ever lost someone through distance or death, cannot fail to be deeply touched by "Wild Horses." I would go on about each of the stories, at length, but that would surely spoil the pleasure of discovery which accompanies reading them.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4.2 out of 5 stars 33 reviews
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Touch the magic, pass it on!" 24 Jan. 1999
By catness@angelfire.com - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
With "Moonlight and Vines" Mr. De Lint returns his readers to the familiar streets of Newford, reacquainting us with characters well known and loved and a few new ones. While his first collection, "Dreams Underfoot," had the sprightly, fey spirit of Jilly Coppercorn tripping through it; and the second "The Ivory and the Horn," the low murmur of a Native American drumming; this third collection, has taken a darker, more Gothic turn. Cemeteries and nighttime figure largely, poetically in the settings, whether an actual place or mood met within the characters, is up to the reader to decide.
One of Mr. De Lint's talents has ever been displaying the hidden corners of an individual's soul, touching upon a common chord of sadness or despair, then clearing a path through it. He promotes what some might consider an old-fashioned concept: there is always hope and a way to get beyond one's own pain. That he is able to do this, without sounding like a wide-eyed Pollyanna, is a true gift. Reminded of the interconnectedness of everything, his characters and the reader emerge from the pages with the feeling that through their actions and compassion, they can change the world.
The value of dreaming, highlighted in "If I Close My Eyes Forever," gives a nod and a smile to Neil Gaiman's equally rich world of the Endless. "The Invisibles" teaches an artist that not only street people can lose their shape and identity. Anyone who has ever lost someone through distance or death, cannot fail to be deeply touched by "Wild Horses." I would go on about each of the stories, at length, but that would surely spoil the pleasure of discovery which accompanies reading them.
Were he to entirely remove the fantasy element from his work, Mr. De Lint would still have beautiful, complete stories and characters. That he does include magic, real magic of the world seen and unseen, is a constant joy and delight. There are very few authors who can actually move me to tears or laughter in public places, Mr. De Lint is numbered among them. I was introduced to his work the way one always finds the best books. A friend handed me a copy of "Dreams Underfoot" and said: "You MUST read this." In the years since, I've done the same to many others. With "Moonlight and Vines," I will continue to do so.
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Magic is alive, and that is not always pretty 25 Feb. 2003
By J. Angus Macdonald - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Charles de Lint has an amazing way of writing; I can only compare his style to Guy Gavriel Key, which makes me think that there is something truly magical in the waters up in Canada. When de Lint writes, you feel a strong tug at your deepest core; you know he is writing about a truth, even if you have yourself never seen balloon people -- they are true on a level beyond something seen on the news.
Many writers currently seem determined to make faeries and other magical creatures very nice, very sweet, and altogether sappy. In these short stories we find nice creatures. We also find not quite so nice ones. We also find quite horrid ones, ones that would make our nightmares sit up and take notice. We find here the wellspring for artistic inspiration and the black void that leads to drug overdoses, the spirit of freedom and the freedom that goes too far and leads to madness. Here is hope, despair, and every other emotion, sometimes whispering, sometimes crying defiantly, but always with a sense that there is a truth here, no matter how much it may seem like a "mere fairy tale".
This is an important point -- de Lint is writing about reality, about real lives, about real feelings, about real emotions. There is a touch of magic to this, from the woman who doesn't want to admit that she sees things others do not, to the man who falls too in love with a photograph. What de Lint is writing about is what makes us ourselves, whether that is very good or very not good; he writes about fears, lusts, emotional expression, distrust, scams, and dozens of other human activities with a passion and an honesty that few can match or manage. In the end these works may be seen as parables, as internal explanations, or almost anything else, but ultimately they are beautiful works, very poignant, and full of sadnss, beauty, joy, and fear. They are raw expressions of all that happens in our world, coloured slightly by a dusting of the fey and the careful tread of a coyote in his moccasins.
Read, love, cry, and feel.
21 of 27 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Walking Wounded 27 Jun. 2005
By Theo Logos - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
The short stories in Charles de Lint's `Moonlight & Vine aren't really fantasies per se - rather they are tales of wounded people - mostly women, who are lonely, despairing, lacking self worth or confidence, unable to maintain healthy relationships, sexually confused, and carrying around old hurts from abusive fathers, departed lovers, and totally dysfunctional families. These people don't take their problems to therapist. Instead, they work them out through encounters with ghosts, vampires, guardian angels, and various spirits and creatures from the spirit world of faerie.
I first encountered Charles de Lint twenty-one years ago when I read his excellent novel `Moonheart'. His unique style of urban fantasy and mixture of old and new world mythologies intrigued me and drew me into his work. Over time, however, his writing concentrated less on the elements that drew me to him, and more on the themes of wounded people working out their recovery through his fantastic world of faerie. While I'm sure there must be a market for this type of writing, it holds no appeal for me. I stopped reading him for a long time, but this past month I decided to give him another try to see if perhaps he had returned to his old magic. Unfortunately, the answer was no. In `Moonlight & Vines' he has given over almost entirely to writing about the walking wounded - emotionally crippled characters. The fantasy elements that are present are so peripheral to these stories that it could almost be removed entirely without significantly changing them.
I believe that De Lint has discovered a niche market with these psychological tales of women wounded from sexual and physical abuse working out their healing and that he now caters to it almost exclusively. In `Moonlight & Vine" he includes a strong current of lesbianism - usually women discovering that they can make connections with other women rather than with men who have always abused them; this appears to play to the same audience. He writes well enough, and if you are drawn to the subject matter, you should enjoy his work. If, however, like me, you find the whole thing rather dreary, you will want to avoid `Moonlight & Vines'. De Lint has come a long way from his outstanding novel `Moonheart', and the magic that vibrated through it is only a distant echo, almost lost within the psychodrama of this collection of tales.

Theo Logos
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Magic in the real world 12 July 2005
By K. Hill - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Fantasy that takes place on another world, with a bunch of characters' names that look like someone stepped on the typewriter keys, is not my thing. (I do make the exception for Tolkien, since his world is based on legends from ours). And most urban fantasy is very dark and depressing, as if magic can't exist on our plane without becoming warped and twisted. I have been a de Lint fan for many years, since reading Moonheart -- his brand of urban fantasy appeals to me, since I love the idea of 'other' impacting on our world. His creation of Newford is typical of any big city anywhere in the world -- there is good and bad about it, light and dark, much like magic itself. I have read all the Newford stories, and this collection is by far the best of them all. I have read a couple reviews that complain de Lint's writing here is too 'happy', that it lacks an edge. I disagree -- the stories don't all end happily. What he has done with them, however, is have them end hopefully. Things may not be perfect for the characters by the end of the story, but whatever problems they still have, they are now equipped to deal with them. I don't need 'happily ever after', but I do like 'this too shall pass'. And I so want to visit the Wordwood .... Buy, beg, or borrow a copy of this, and prepare for one of the most mystical and amazing reads of your life.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars There is magic in this book, a must read 4 Feb. 2000
By J. P. Vergne - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the first book of Charles de Lint I have read and I was fascinated by his vision and perception of "reality". I am currently on my second reading of the book and there is so much in between the lines, so much true emotions, pain, love, fear, happiness, sadness, etc. I was sorry for the reader who commented this book was full of violence because he missed the mark. This book should not be used as an escape "from" our problems but "to" a different perception and ways of seeing things. Pain is all around us(have you watched the news lately?)but there is also redemption, and hope and that is what Mr. de Lint is helping us see through the characters in this magical book. I highly recommend it to every reader to read it more than once.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know

Look for similar items by category


Feedback