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on 19 November 2001
This book is a lucid account of mood disorder by a doctor who has spent the whole of his working life looking after people with these problems.He gives a very full and well referenced account and even makes neuroanatomy understandable! Despite not having suffered a mood disorder himself, Dr Whybrow obviously understands. His writing is consistantly informative and reassuring - never patronising.I recommend this book to those affected by mood disorder, their medical advisors and their close friends.
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on 2 December 2007
Very well written and well researched, this book is cotton candy for anyone with a psychopharmacological sweet tooth. It contains a good deal of information about neuroscience and psychiatry, including some of the historical underpinnings of these fields. I'm guessing that others have compared this with Peter Kramer's Listening to Prozac, and there are some superficial similarities, such as a somewhat philosophical bent. Like Kramer's book, this one also has detailed, very interesting case studies, where the ones in A Mood Apart are probably a bit longer and more detailed. Two case studies that I remember well are those of Claire Dubois and John Moorehead, where both persons are afflicted with significant depression. A major distinction between this book and Listening to Prozac is that the latter was much more explicitly about antidepressants and their philosophical implications. One very mild criticism of A Mood Apart is that I wonder if the author thinks that depression is simply a more extreme variant of ordinary sadness, when I don't think this is the case. Overall, a captivating read that anyone interested in mental health, and mood disorders in particular, will find fascinating and informative. Author of Adjust Your Brain: A Practical Theory for Maximizing Mental Health.
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