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Comment: Title: A Month In The Country, Publisher: Folio Society, Binding: Hardcover, 2010. 121 pages. No dust jacket. Brown, pictorial boards with cloth spine in slipcase. Illustrated by Ian Stephens. Firm binding with mild tanning to pages. Mild rubbing along edges. Slipcase has mild wear along edges and over surfaces. Check our feedback, all books quality controlled and dispatched within 24 hours of order.
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A Month In The Country Hardcover – 2010

4.6 out of 5 stars 140 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 121 pages
  • Publisher: Folio Society; Second Printing edition (2010)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003WMJX3S
  • Product Dimensions: 27.5 x 17.5 x 2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (140 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,822,338 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

A tall , thin hardback ( 1231 pages ) . Published by , The Folio Society in 2010 , 2nd. printing . 1st. printing was , 1999 . Quarter bound in brown buckram ,. illustrated paper sides . ( Both Boards ) . Includes a brown slipcase .


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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Birkin, the ageing narrator, reflects on the summer of 1920 when he - a young, shell-shocked and cuckolded survivor of World War One - spent some weeks in the Yorkshire village of Oxgodby. He is there, ostensibly, to uncover a lost medieval mural in the village church; a painstaking process of recovery. Yet while there, living and working in the church, he discovers treasures of far greater value in the people around him. He is shown anew the gifts of compassion and acceptance, of friendship and respect that he thought the Great War had blown away forever. Spanning one short, hazy English summer Carr has written a short, hazy English novel to treasure. Its ending comes, like that of the season itself, too soon and the reader is deprived of nothing less than the light of a sun. Magical and mournful, this novel's controlled simplicity numbs me each time I read it.
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Format: Paperback
This book is, without doubt, one of the most beautiful I have ever read. It is deceptively simple and delightfully slow-paced, full of Lawrence-like depictions of a vanished pastoral landscape. The focal points are a casual and peculiar friendship between two war-scarred, shell-shocked men and just a barely discernible hint of a female love interest. In a book barely 100 pages long, the author not only manages to give us a story that flows like a stream, but also achieves stunning characterisation, bitter indictment of war and a corresponding celebration of peace, a little suspense, and even a twist in the tail. An exemplary study in subtlety.
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Format: Paperback
I have read and re-read this story so many times now that it is hard to know what to write. Suffice to say, this book is an exquisite recreation of a bittersweet summer which you read first as a perfect historical novel, re-read as an analysis of love and art and finally almost breathe in as a cobweb of love, pain, healing and rediscovery. If that makes it sound like new-age hippiedom then I misdescribe it. In its restrained beauty this book somehow captures the essence of what, even in these more jaded days, is unique about England. And I write that as an inhabitant of Wales. It is a wonderful tale.
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By A Customer on 12 Jun. 2001
Format: Paperback
It tells the story of Tom Birkin, recently returned from WW I, who goes to the town of Oxgodby to restore a medieval wall-painting in an old church. Over the course of his time there, he gets absorbed into the life of the town, falls in love, learns (and reveals) something about the nature of art, and the healing power of both art and love. That makes it sound as if the book's some sort of mushy new-age blather, and it's not at all. It's a short and profoundly entertaining novel. I would have loved to have been assigned this in a high-school English class, because (1) Carr's vocabulary is remarkable, and the occasional strange words he uses are worth looking up (e.g., "sneck"), and (2) it has a lot of the sort of structure that one is forced to write about in English classes ("contrast the relationship between Birkin and his work with that between Moon and his...") but which in this book actually contributed something to the story -- there are multiple parallel threads in the book, and their interweaving makes it richer. I could've written a decent essay about that...
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By M. Dowden HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 16 April 2016
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Probably Joseph Lloyd Carr’s most popular novel, and certainly his masterpiece this is a relatively short read that offers so much. And please note, yes I did put down Joseph and not James as Penelope Fitzgerald has done in her introduction to this. Why this wasn’t picked up before publication I have no idea.

The narrator here is Tom Birkin, and he is looking back to 1920 when in the summer he travelled to the village of Oxgodby in Yorkshire to uncover a mural that has been concealed under whitewash in the local church.

As Carr mentions in his foreword he wanted to create something along the lines of Hardy, a pastoral novel as such, but as he tells us things do alter whilst writing and changes are made, although this is still a pastoral novel as such and one that takes in the last period before horses were replaced by motor power.

Along with Birkin who is doing the restoration in the church there is also Moon who has been employed to find a certain grave. Moon like Birkin both served in the trenches and know that it has altered them. The landscape really comes alive in this relatively short tale and there are some interesting characters here. What for Birkin is a job becomes more for the short while he spends in Oxgodby as he finds a sort of idyll. As we see from the narration this is a man looking back with fond nostalgia for those days long ago, ones that perhaps helped him bring a bit more peace to his life after the War.

This brings up a number of issues, not just the First World War, but country life, where all pitched in to bring in the harvest, and also this touches on homosexuality, and heterosexual love, as well as religion.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Never mind the mauve cover. This postcard size edition fits easily into a small handbag or even pocket and at long last typos such as "Mr moon" have been corrected. The print is blacker than the elegant but hard to read grey in the previous Penguin Classics edition, hence there's nothing to impede or distract a reader from enjoying its barely 100 pages in one sitting, perhaps on a long train ride.. The story opens with a stepping off a train at a rural Yorkshire station and once arrived, you will not want to leave.
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