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The Monstrosity of Christ: Paradox or Dialectic? (Short Circuits) by [Zizek, Slavoj, John Milbank]
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The Monstrosity of Christ: Paradox or Dialectic? (Short Circuits) Kindle Edition

3.2 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Review

"In this dazzling dialogue, Zizek and Milbank change words and cross swords, until the point where both recognize that Christ and Hegel, in their monstrosity, look very much alike. A phenomenal achievement!"--Catherine Malabou, Maitre de Conferences, Philosophy Department, Universite Paris-X Nanterre

About the Author

Slavoj Zizek is a philosopher and cultural critic. He is the author of more than thirty books, including Looking Awry: An Introduction to Jacques Lacan through Popular Culture, The Puppet and the Dwarf: The Perverse Core of Christianity, The Parallax View, and (with John Milbank) The Monstrosity of Christ: Paradox or Dialect, these four published by the MIT Press. John Milbank is an influential Christian theologian and the author of Theology and Social Theory: Beyond Secular Reason and other books. Creston Davis, who conceived of the encounter between Slavoj Zizek and John Milbank, studied under both men.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1168 KB
  • Print Length: 321 pages
  • Publisher: The MIT Press; Reprint edition (25 Feb. 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004NSUXPC
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #759,991 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
(5 stars for Zizek, 2 for Milbank)

This is a collaboration between Zizek and John Milbank - Zizek writes the first part, Milbank the middle and Zizek the end. Zizek is of course a famous cultural theorist of the left, Milbank a Christian theologian who supports Radical Orthodoxy.

I enjoyed the book overall, but found Milbank's middle section hard work. I found him pretty obscure and often difficult to follow - I've taken an interest in theology and philosophy for the last thirty years so I think I'm ok at the "interested layman" level of reading, but I struggled with this, even though I was genuinely interested in what he had to say.

Zizek is much more enjoyable - it is a while since I have read him, but coming back to him was a delight. I'm not saying he is the easiest person to follow either, but it doesn't really matter, you know that basically he is trying to make you think about things differently, take what you thought might be the case and turn it on its head - and doing so in an engaging and intelligent way.

So try to summarise the book - well they certainly do make reference to each other. They are clearly in disagreement, Zizek offers a sort of Christian Atheism as the true Christianity - when God becomes human and dies, this really is God emptying himself and freeing humanity to make their own choices. Following Lacan however he says that when God dies he does not vanish, but goes into the unconscious, unaware of his own death.

There is a lot of this sort of playing with ideas and theology, but essentially the issue is a political one.
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Format: Paperback
The reader should beware: a knowledge of Christian theology and of Hegel's philosophy is a necessary requirement for understanding this book. A more approachable introduction to Zizek's atheistic Christianity is 'The Puppet and the Dwarf'. Here, however, his musings are followed by a reply from the Anglican theologian John Milbank. There is an aggressive tone to Milbank's humourless ramblings. He seems to believe that only one interpretation of Christianity (his own) is acceptable, and that all modern philosophy is 'nihilistic' (a characterization which would certainly not be accepted by many of the thinkers to whom he refers). Milbank's understanding of Hegel is superficial; his comprehension of Lacan is defective. The best part of the book is Zizek's reply to this, illuminating his own views in the sparkling light of intellectual fireworks.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
great item good price
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Format: Paperback
To be dialectical about this I am both an idiot and not an idiot. I think there is something in this book despite the fact that the review and the product information are meaningless obscurantist double speak. I must embrace my idiocy and thereby negate it. Zizek is a kind of intellectual voucher: a red badge of courage. One suspects the intention is there whilst suspecting the intention itself...
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Format: Hardcover
Christ was not monstrous nor was he a monster. He was a simple man who spoke like a child.

This author makes everything about Christ seem complicated. He is devoid of innocence.

Why not put Christ's teaching into practice in relation to ordinary people (not just academics like Badiou)? This would be better than writing down your misunderstandings for an academic elite.
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