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Monsters of Men (Chaos Walking) Paperback – 2 May 2013

4.8 out of 5 stars 181 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 656 pages
  • Publisher: Walker (2 May 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1406344486
  • ISBN-13: 978-1406344486
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 4.5 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (181 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 276,864 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"Patrick Ness is an insanely beautiful writer." --John Green --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Book Description

A new edition of this award-winning conclusion to the Chaos Walking trilogy, with a brand new and previously unpublished short story, Snowscape.story.

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Story-telling doesn't get any better than this. I defy anyone to start "The Knife of Never Letting Go", the first book in the "Chaos Walking" trilogy, and not follow it through to the conclusion of "Monsters of Men", the third.

Ness' universe has been thought through in intricate detail, his imagining of his other world the best I have read since Tolkien forty years ago. The plot is complex, multi-layered and ever-shifting, but it is brought to a terrific conclusion. The storyline seduces and deceives all the time: just when you think it is going one way, another twist is in store. The intriguing use of different fonts for different narrators, and especially for the excellent device of the "noise", works very well indeed. (Looking for an insight into the mind of man's best friend? Manchee is the best talking dog in fiction.)

There are cliff-hangers a-plenty, but the author has a lot of plot up his sleeve. He does not let up, and he doesn't pull his punches. As well as love and courage and integrity in this trilogy, there are death and torture and betrayal. This is particularly true of Book Two ("The Ask and The Answer") where deception, betrayal and duplicity constantly wrong-foot the reader. Throughout, there are some stunningly well-written characters, particularly the unhinged Mayor Prentiss, some of whose deeds could have come from the more sadistic pages of Cormac McCarthy. "... the desire of most folks is to be told what to do," he says, in the all too reasonable tones of an off-world Stalin. "People say they want freedom, but what they really want is freedom from worry. If I take care of their problems, they don't mind being told what to do." (Pretensions towards dictatorship and looking for a psychopathic role model? The Mayor is your man.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I only finished this a few minutes ago. It's 4am. Not many books keep me up this late; each book in this stunning trilogy has managed it.

The secret is the naturalistic narration. Breathless, sincere. Real. Ness knows these kids, it's almost as if he can hear their thoughts on command and he's just a channel for their voices, for the story.

There's war. There are LOTS of explosions. There's probably more death than the second book had. Definitely, in fact. There are epic confrontations and earth shaking battles aplenty. But that's not what this book - this series - is about. This is about empathy, and it has been from the start. Noise lets you know how other people feel. What damage can that do a person if they know exactly how their cruelty felt? What chance at redemption can that bring? It's a heady theme, and fortunately, it suits the tale Ness wants to tell perfectly.

So, I want to keep this short because I'm tired and still sort of recovering from the pace of the book. Would I recommend it to you? You probably read the first two if you're looking at this. In that case, hell yes. If you're here because you saw that a new book was being released and haven't read the first two, check those out and come back when Todd and Viola have slipped into your head.
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Format: Hardcover
It is here... and the end is in sight...I am slowing down and the sense of doom and grief are growing and yet these exhilirating books are a joy to read...a joy to meet Todd and Viola and Manchee and Angharrad and, of course, the Spackle/Land. Full of moral dilemmas, the thin line between good and evil, love and loss, heartbreak and suffering...this the last is perhaps the most human of them all! In classic Science Fiction mode it delivers powerful ideas and insights into the human condition at the same time as creating a believable and complex alien environment.
Read these books, your life will be enriched!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the new edition of last book in the Chaos Walking trilogy. If you want to know if you should get this series of books, then the answer is yes, and get all three at once - there are 87 reviews on the page for the previous edition of Monsters of Men alone that will tell you why! If you are deciding between this edition or the old one, then get this edition because there is no way you will not want to read the extra short story, Snowscape, when you've finished. It's my teenage daughter's favourite series of books ever, and she bought the new editions just for that reason (despite owning the others). She didn't regret it - though still hopes Patrick Ness will write more. But as an adult I think this is one of the most perfect short stories I've ever read - though it only makes sense if you've read all the trilogy, because you need the whole context of New World. It's about redemption, it had me in tears, it's awesome. The short stories with the first two books are also really good, enough to make me go back and start reading the series again.
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Format: Hardcover
"War," says Mayor Prentiss, his eyes glinting. "At last."

So begins Monsters of Men, the final volume in Patrick Ness's multi-award-winning Chaos Walking trilogy. Lines have been drawn, armies are marching; divisive and polarising leaders have got what they wanted. And Todd and Viola are caught in the middle of it, faced with ominous odds and unenviable choices. The first of these is to split up, with Todd staying behind to keep an eye on the Mayor and fight the invading Spackle army while Viola goes in search of the scout ship that has just landed. Once again, their trust in each other will be tested to its absolute limit.

Given that its title stems from the warning delivered by various characters throughout the series - "war makes monsters of men" - it is no surprise that war is the predominant theme and, for better or worse, shapes everything that takes place. Yet Monsters of Men is as complex and multifarious as war itself, an investigation into the many ways and many ends for which people are drawn into it. It is an enthralling culmination to the finest series I've read in many years. Chaos Walking combines first rate characterisation with heart-stoppingly exciting plots and engaging, direct, and often lyrical prose. I run out of superlatives when describing just how good it is.

Best of all it challenges the reader. You cannot sit back and watch passively as events unfold. At every turn you are placed in the characters' shoes, confronted with the question: what would you do? What would you do if your greatest enemy were the only person who could save you from a marauding army bent on revenge?
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