• RRP: £10.81
  • You Save: £0.20 (2%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Monsieur Monde Vanishes (... has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Brit-Books
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Simply Brit: We have dispatched from our UK warehouse books of good condition to over 1 million satisfied customers worldwide. We are committed to providing you with a reliable and efficient service at all times.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Monsieur Monde Vanishes (New York Review Books Classics) Paperback – 1 Jun 2004

4.3 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£7.68
Paperback
"Please retry"
£10.61
£5.49 £5.16
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more
£10.61 FREE Delivery in the UK. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

  • Monsieur Monde Vanishes (New York Review Books Classics)
  • +
  • Dirty Snow (New York Review Books Classics)
  • +
  • The Widow (New York Review Books Classics)
Total price: £25.44
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: New York Review of Books (Jun. 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590170962
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590170960
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 1 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 327,017 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

" Attention should be paid to the New York Review of Books' continuing reissues of Georges Simenon. Simenon was legendary both for his literary skill- four or five books every year for 40 years- and his sexual capacity, at least to hear him tell it. What we can speak of with some certainty are the novels, which are tough, rigorously unsentimental and full of rage, duplicity and, occasionally, justice. Simenon's tone and dispassionate examination of humanity was echoed by Patricia Highsmith, who dispensed with the justice. So far, the Review has published "Tropic Moon, The Man Who Watched Trains Go By, Red Lights, Dirty Snow "and "Three Bedrooms in Manhattan"; "The Strangers in the House" comes out in November. Try one, and you'll want to read more." - "The Palm Beach Post"

"Attention should be paid to the New York Review of Books' continuing reissues of Georges Simenon. Simenon was legendary both for his literary skill-four or five books every year for 40 years-and his sexual capacity, at least to hear him tell it. What we can speak of with some certainty are the novels, which are tough, rigorously unsentimental and full of rage, duplicity and, occasionally, justice. Simenon's tone and dispassionate examination of humanity was echoed by Patricia Highsmith, who dispensed with the justice. So far, the Review has published "Tropic Moon, The Man Who Watched Trains Go By, Red Lights, Dirty Snow "and "Three Bedrooms in Manhattan"; "The Strangers in the House" comes out in November. Try one, and you'll want to read more." -"The Palm Beach Post"

"A truly wonderful writer...marvellously readable, lucid, simple, absolutely in tune with that world he creates."
-- Muriel Spark

Attention should be paid to the New York Review of Books' continuing reissues of Georges Simenon. Simenon was legendary both for his literary skill four or five books every year for 40 years and his sexual capacity, at least to hear him tell it. What we can speak of with some certainty are the novels, which are tough, rigorously unsentimental and full of rage, duplicity and, occasionally, justice. Simenon's tone and dispassionate examination of humanity was echoed by Patricia Highsmith, who dispensed with the justice. So far, the Review has published "Tropic Moon, The Man Who Watched Trains Go By, Red Lights, Dirty Snow "and "Three Bedrooms in Manhattan"; "The Strangers in the House" comes out in November. Try one, and you'll want to read more. "The Palm Beach Post"
"A truly wonderful writer marvellously readable, lucid, simple, absolutely in tune with that world he creates."
Muriel Spark"

About the Author

Georges Simenon (1903 1989) was born in Liege, Belgium. He went to work as a reporter at the age of fifteen and in 1923 moved to Paris, where under various pseudonyms he became a highly successful and prolific author of pulp fiction while leading a dazzling social life. In the early 1930s, Simenon emerged as a writer under his own name, gaining renown for his detective stories featuring Inspector Maigret. He also began to write his psychological novels, or "romans durs" books in which he displays a sympathetic awareness of the emotional and spiritual pain underlying the routines of daily life. Having written nearly two hundred books under his own name and become the best-selling author in the world, Simenon retired as a novelist in 1973, devoting himself instead to dictating several volumes of memoirs.
Larry McMurtry lives in Archer City, Texas. His novels include "The Last Picture Show," "Terms of Endearment," "Lonesome Dove" (winner of the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction), "Folly and Glory "and "Rhino Ranch." His nonfiction works include a biography of Crazy Horse, "Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen," "Paradise," "Sacagawea s Nickname: Essays on the American West" and, most recently, "Custer.""


Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I am glad to see that I am not the first person to review this book. Like the previous review I am shocked that hardly anyone has heard of Simenon's roman durs. They are, without question, a genre of their own and superb additions to the mid-20th century European literature focused on existentialism, isloation and loneliness. It is not a stretch, in my mind, to compare these works to Camus and Sartre. Congratulations to the NYRB Classics editors for reprinting all of these elegant masterpieces.

Monsieur Monde Vanishes is set in the dark realms of French literature. Lots of smoke, dingy bars, and fadingly elegant restaurants litter the landscape. Simenon is a master of mood and creation of a sense of place. As the title suggests a man disappears and attempts to recalibrate his life into something more exciting and interesting. Things do not really go to plan as Monsier Monde comes into contact with blasts from the past and other unsightly characters.

The is my second of Simenon's roman durs and whilst, in my opinion, not as strong or interestingly dark as "The Engagement" it is still a wonderful addition to any collection of mid-20th century European writing.
1 Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
there is something wrong in the world when this book has gone this long without a review. georges simenon - world famous for his Maigret novels - wrote a collection of slim and elegant romans durs, quiet, sparse works full of ennui and weary resignation, each one perfectly pitched and beautifully written.

monsieur monde vanishes is ostensibly about very little, a rich man who is disallusioned with his comfortable but dull life takes off in an attempt to find some greater sense of meaning. in the hands of a lesser writer it would be instantly forgettable, but simenon creates such a pervasive sense of place and character that this book stayed with me for weeks after i read it and spurred me on to buy the complete set.

as a sidebar i just want to add that NYRB are doing an amazing job at trumpetting unjustly overlooked works and deserve all the support discerning readers can give them. so yes you can buy the latest brick of schlock for the same price but you will read it once and bin it, a book like this will be a definate reread.
1 Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It is surprising that this book is unknown. It is a masterpiece. Monde has a comfortable, but joyless and pointless, life married to a formidable dominatrix, so he runs away. His friendship with a young dancer leads to a more interesting series of adventures, eventually finding his first wife, in distressed circumstances and addicted to morphine. He notices how much she resembles their son, who is gay and with whom he has an unsatisfactory relationship. He decides to return home, taking his former wife with him, not to cure her addiction, but to ensure she is safely looked after. He is more confident and assertive and sets out to get to know his son better. A glorious message of hope- not found in much modern fiction.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
We like to think of angst as a modern condition, and whereas modern writers will take hundreds of pages to explore the human condition, Simenon was doing it in just over 100 pages at a time - and saying more with less - in the first half of the 20th century.

Monsieur Monde Vanishes tells the story of a 48 year old successful business man who, on his birthday, decides he's had enough of things and vanishes. He seeks out escape from the confines of his moneyed but sterile existence in Paris, and travels south to engage in a life with more down at heel characters and settings. Needless to say the experience isn't particularly happy, but it does afford Simenon the opportunity to explore a range of issues about what it is to be human, and the price we pay for the choices we make.

With typical precise, clean writing, Simenon offers insights that other writers would lay on with a trowel. It's well-written, and the familiar themes of identity, despair, escape and redemption are present, but without the central character of Inspector Maigret to keep the plot together. After a promising start, I thought the book fell away quite badly, although the pace and writing kept up my interest throughout.

As a picture of life in France at this time (the book was first published in 1945), it's brilliant - capturing the social fabric of a world long gone - and yet not so very different from our own.

I completely agree with other reviewers and Simenon enthusiasts commenting on this book that his works have been overlooked for too long. Coming late to them myself, I'm making up for lost time, but finding them compelling reading, even if occasionally they don't come up to the mark - which I felt this one didn't. Nevertheless, still much better than so much of the stuff that gets churned out today that seeks to explore similar landscapes.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Look for similar items by category


Feedback