Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Kindle Price: £3.09

Save £5.90 (66%)

includes VAT*
* Unlike print books, digital books are subject to VAT.

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Mongol by [Ramsay, Uuganaa]
Kindle App Ad

Mongol Kindle Edition

4.8 out of 5 stars 63 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
£3.09

Kindle Books from 99p
Load up your Kindle library before your next holiday -- browse over 500 Kindle Books on sale from 99p until 31 August, 2016. Shop now

Product Description

Review

'A gripping read that will touch your heart... an enthralling tale, beautifully written. Moving and uplifting.' --Sheila Grant, NewBooks Magazine.

'An interesting narrative of considerable cultural insight and cross-cultural value.' --Colin Nicholson.

'Thought-provoking insight... honest and heart-wrenching.' --Penny Green, Down's Heart Group.

About the Author

Uuganaa Ramsay was born in Mongolia and grew up in a yurt, living a nomadic life eating marmot meat and distilling vodka from yoghurt. After winning a place on a teacher-training course she came to the UK, and now lives in Scotland. She wrote Mongol with the help of the Janetta Bowie Chalice Non-Fiction Book Award from the Scottish Association of Writers. It is her first book.

Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 570 KB
  • Print Length: 180 pages
  • Publisher: Saraband (10 Dec. 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00D0UXWWA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 63 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #162,479 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
In ‘Mongol’ by Uuganna Ramsey the reader is taken on a heartfelt journey from the remoteness of her childhood in Mongolia with its political transition to the west of Scotland where she now lives. Through her son Billy’s short life Uuganna campaigns for Down’s syndrome informing those who misguidedly use ‘Mongol’ as a derogatory term insulting the heritage of a very proud people.
This is an informative open account of one mother’s love and helplessness which fuels her passion to raise awareness in Down’s syndrome. Young people would certainly benefit were schools to include this book in reading lists.
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A poignant and moving memoir combining a fascinating account of the author's early life in Mongolia with the story of her son Billy, born with Down's Syndrome. The contrast between rural Mongolia and life in the west of Scotland is wonderfully evoked and the heartbreaking tale of Billy is beautifully described. This is a book that brought tears to my eyes several times but left me hugely uplifted by the strength and courage of Uuganaa and her amazing journey. I can't recommend this book highly enough.
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
This book is two stories merged into one. Uuganaa tells of her childhood in Mongolia,herding sheep,living in a Ger and learning to distil vodka from yougurt.Her childhood was probably the complete opposite of being young in the UK but what came across was how loving it was and how close all her extended family were to each other.Uuganaa always wants to see the world and eventually she moves to the UK and meets her future husband,here the second story begins as when her third child is born the doctor tells her he has Downs Syndrome he then changes his mind and says he was confused because of her son's Mongolian features. Billy did indeed have Downs Sydrome and lost his fight for life at three months old. Uuganaa begins writing letters to Billy in a blog and to keep his memory alive she has written her memoir.
This book is beautifully written and I love the way it starts and ends with her baby son Billy.You won't read this book without shedding a few tears but there are many lighthearted moments as we share Uuganaa's journey from one culture to another.
The word Mongol is used by some people as a derogatory term and Uuganna is campaigning to try and stop this as she and everyone who lives in Mongolia are proud to be Mongols.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
This book moved me on several different levels, connecting with many emotions. I laughed, I was surprised, shocked, educated and, as a mother, I was unable, at times, to stop the tears rolling down my cheeks. My admiration for the author knows no bounds - a truly remarkable woman. The reader can see how her upbringing made her resilient, adaptable and strong enough to move so far from her home and family.
The fact that she decided to take on the world and its prejudice fills me with admiration - what a legacy for her son Billy and tribute to other lost babies.
I feel privileged to have had an insight into another culture and another woman's life. Mongol is an uplifting read and one I would recommend.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I've been catching up on a lot of reading over Christmas and - once started - I couldn't put this one down. I didn't quite know what to expect from it. I knew that it was a loving testament to the author's little boy, Billy. And I knew that it was also about her own childhood and upbringing in Mongolia - very different in so many ways from her life in Scotland. All I can say is that I wasn't disappointed. This is a beautifully constructed book, written with a refreshing directness and honesty. But it's an emotional book too - why wouldn't it be? - and it manages to intrigue, amuse and sadden all at the same time. Quite often I was in tears over it, but suddenly, there would be some wry and intelligent observation about cultural differences, and I'd be smiling again. This was particularly apposite for me, since my own father came from Europe's far eastern border and - although Uuganaa's background is very different - it still occurred to me from time to time that my father must have experienced a similar cultural disorientation now and then. So the book was doubly illuminating. And absolutely fascinating too in reminding me of how little we really know about the daily lives of other people. We have so much information - but so little real knowledge.
But this is, of course, much more than an account of one woman's journey across different cultures. Because it is also the story of the author's child, Billy, born with Down's Syndrome - and therefore it is a story of prejudice as well as love, of resilience in the face of ignorance - but also a story of hope, of common humanity, of kindness and the possibility of change. At a time when there seems to be a growing prejudice both against those with disability, and those we are content to label 'foreigners' this book should be required reading. A counterbalance. A new, moving and in the last analysis, heartwarming perspective.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
As a child in '60s Britain the very name (Outer) Mongolia suggested to me distance, remoteness, other-worldliness even. In the late '80s I had the opportunity to work there and indeed it did seem a bit like a different world - but such a fascinating one. It was socialist (of the Soviet variety) with a rural economy characterised by nomadic pastoralism. Earlier this year I came across an excerpt from 'Mongol' on the web and my interest was piqued. This book is the story of a young girl growing up during the last years of socialism. It is about ordinary family life in rural Mongolia and, if you have been to Mongolia then, like me, you will find yourself reading about scenes that are so typically Mongolian but learning a lot that is new as well. If you have not been there then you will find this book a captivating insight into a very different culture. Mongolia is changing fast and this memoir describes some aspects of life which have now gone completely. The author also describes leaving her childhood home and moving to Ulaanbataar (the capital city) to study followed by further studies in the UK, meeting her husband there and finally settling in Scotland.

But the book is much more than this. At its core, it is the story of the birth and brief life of a much-loved child; a boy with Down's syndrome, born to a Mongolian mother living in Scotland. The author writes candidly about this experience, including the unwelcome revelation that 'Mongolism' was, and in some cases remains, the term used in Britain and elsewhere to describe Down's syndrome. Indeed, it was this that in part provided the stimulus for the author to write the book. It is difficult to do justice to this aspect of the book in a review such as this. You need to read it to appreciate it properly.

Mongol is very well written and easy to read. It is informative, delightful, moving and poignant; all-in-all a wonderful book that this reviewer has no hesitation in recommending.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

click to open popover